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Early retirement can be hazardous to your health
Old 04-23-2011, 01:41 PM   #1
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Early retirement can be hazardous to your health

Saw this in today's newspaper:

Schlaerth: Early retirement can be hazardous to your health

The takeaway for me is that not everyone will benefit from early retirement in the same way, or even at all. Each person needs to decide what is important to them in their 50s, 60s, and beyond, and figure out when and what "retirement" means.

For those of us blessed to have our early retirement plans work out the way we hoped, this is probably less of an issue. But for those who "fall into" early retirement either unexpectedly or without planning, I can see how it could be a real issue. So as much as I love being ER, I also need to respect those making other choices. Don't want to get into anything like the "mommy wars" in the 90s between w*rking and stay-at-home moms - wow, those are bad memories
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Old 04-23-2011, 02:33 PM   #2
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Old 04-23-2011, 03:07 PM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MBAustin View Post
Saw this in today's newspaper:

Schlaerth: Early retirement can be hazardous to your health

The takeaway for me is that not everyone will benefit from early retirement in the same way, or even at all. Each person needs to decide what is important to them in their 50s, 60s, and beyond, and figure out when and what "retirement" means.

For those of us blessed to have our early retirement plans work out the way we hoped, this is probably less of an issue. But for those who "fall into" early retirement either unexpectedly or without planning, I can see how it could be a real issue. So as much as I love being ER, I also need to respect those making other choices. Don't want to get into anything like the "mommy wars" in the 90s between w*rking and stay-at-home moms - wow, those are bad memories
There is also a very heartwarming story on the website about a retired orthopedic surgeon who is helping the poor.

Retired Austin doctor helps poor patients needing orthopedic care
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Old 04-23-2011, 03:59 PM   #4
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Each person needs to decide what is important to them in their 50s, 60s, and beyond,
Yep. What is important to me is to have control over how I spend my time (which implies being FI).

Quote:
Originally Posted by MBAustin
and figure out when and what "retirement" means.
For me, it means having control over how I spend my time - - in other words, not working for someone else who can tell me what I must do with my time - - not working even part time.

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So as much as I love being ER, I also need to respect those making other choices.
Sure! It's fine with me if others want to define their retirement differently, as long as they don't try to define mine for me.

What is amazing to me is that those I have known in the "Greatest Generation" managed to agree on what retirement is as far as I could tell - - some retired, and others preferred to continue working, sometimes at a slower pace, but they mostly seem to have a good grasp of what retirement IS. Now that the baby boom is reaching retirement age, there is such a big push to redefine retirement and I'm not sure why.
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Old 04-23-2011, 06:23 PM   #5
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"Early retirement can be hazardous to your health",........ um, I suppose in contrast to the shocker that work related stress can kill you.
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Old 04-24-2011, 11:39 AM   #6
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An interesting and persuasive article.
Quote:
Increasingly, it has become obvious that the old dictum "use it or lose it" definitely applies where humans are concerned.
Yes, but who among us would doubt that? That's why we exercise, pursue hobbies, volunteer, ... Perhaps recreation needs practice to get good at, and Schlaerth's patients are predominantly from a earlier generation and poorer background so that they didn't learn enough about having fun. Personally, I've come to think of health and fitness as a hobby which I can devote more attention to now, without the distraction of work.
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Old 04-24-2011, 12:27 PM   #7
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Like stressful narcissistic managers and idiot coworkers are great for your health.Media pumping new BS propaganda.
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Old 04-24-2011, 01:49 PM   #8
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For me, it means having control over how I spend my time - - in other words, not working for someone else who can tell me what I must do with my time - - not working even part time. Sure! It's fine with me if others want to define their retirement differently, as long as they don't try to define mine for me.
Coming to the end of my first career, to me it would be ideal to start a second career (after a few months to unwind) in a field that makes me want to jump out of bed each and every morning. I wouldn't have to care about the salary too much. Granted they're not easy to find, but they do exist, who hasn't known someone who genuinely enjoyed their work that much? I can't imagine not trying to find work I love at my relatively young age, I'll be too old to be productive soon enough. Going into business for yourself is another alternative, could be more $ rewarding but more $ at risk too, so not for me.

I'm FI, so I don't have to worry about being trapped in another career I don't like - if I find I don't/or come to dislike the work, I'll just give fair notice and look for another. It's fine with me if others want to define their retirement differently, as long as they don't try to define mine for me.
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Old 04-24-2011, 03:47 PM   #9
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Like stressful narcissistic managers and idiot coworkers are great for your health.Media pumping new BS propaganda.
Indeed, that crap was unhealthy.
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Old 04-24-2011, 05:00 PM   #10
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There is also a very heartwarming story on the website about a retired orthopedic surgeon who is helping the poor.

Retired Austin doctor helps poor patients needing orthopedic care
Nice that you noticed that article! Agree - he's a great example of someone defining their retirement in a way that works for them (and others).

IMHO, the Statesman is quite a good newspaper, especially for a non-major city press.
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Old 04-24-2011, 07:53 PM   #11
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"Early retirement can be hazardous to your health",........ um, I suppose in contrast to the shocker that work related stress can kill you.
When I retired my biggest surprise was realizing how much stress I had been under. Once it was gone it was one of the best feelings I've ever had.
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Old 04-24-2011, 08:26 PM   #12
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When I retired my biggest surprise was realizing how much stress I had been under. Once it was gone it was one of the best feelings I've ever had.
Amen
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Old 04-25-2011, 09:32 PM   #13
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When I retired my biggest surprise was realizing how much stress I had been under. Once it was gone it was one of the best feelings I've ever had.
I'll have to agree with this also. Regarding the original article referenced: I believe the people who plan ahead and have a plan for what they are going to do after they retire will be better physically. But most people don't plan very well and end up being the statistics that the doctor refers to. Just my 2 cents.
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Old 04-25-2011, 10:36 PM   #14
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Coming to the end of my first career, to me it would be ideal to start a second career (after a few months to unwind) in a field that makes me want to jump out of bed each and every morning. I wouldn't have to care about the salary too much. Granted they're not easy to find, but they do exist, who hasn't known someone who genuinely enjoyed their work that much? I can't imagine not trying to find work I love at my relatively young age, I'll be too old to be productive soon enough. Going into business for yourself is another alternative, could be more $ rewarding but more $ at risk too, so not for me.

I'm FI, so I don't have to worry about being trapped in another career I don't like - if I find I don't/or come to dislike the work, I'll just give fair notice and look for another. It's fine with me if others want to define their retirement differently, as long as they don't try to define mine for me.
Midpack, I think you and I are on the same path. I'm definately leaving my first career in another month (one month ahead of you) after more than 30 years. I don't like my job now, I don't like the company amymore and I suspect I'm just burned out. I'm going to take the summer to relax and try out this ER thing. But I'm not sure I will like it full time at my age. I suppose many that ER in their mid 50's or earlier goes through this process. I'm hoping something exciting comes my way. If it doesn't that is okay too as, like you, I am FI.
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Old 04-25-2011, 11:10 PM   #15
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Read the article. But I'm enjoying ER. I work out on a regular basis etc. I'm thinking of taking up Taekwondo. The class consists of two teenage boys and two young boys. Should be interesting.
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Old 04-25-2011, 11:32 PM   #16
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Read the article. But I'm enjoying ER. I work out on a regular basis etc. I'm thinking of taking up Taekwondo. The class consists of two teenage boys and two young boys. Should be interesting.
The teenagers likely will beat the stuffing out of you. You should be ble to handle the kids though.

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Old 04-26-2011, 09:29 AM   #17
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Early retirement (and regular retirement for that matter) is only hazardous if you let it be.
Iron rusts from disuse; stagnant water loses its purity and in cold weather becomes frozen; even so does inaction sap the vigor of the mind.

Leonardo da Vinci (14521519)
Italian painter, sculptor, and inventor

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Old 04-26-2011, 09:33 AM   #18
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Ah, yes, the old "retirement causes your mind and body to rot" argument foisted on us by the people who want to see us be wage slaves for life.
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Old 04-26-2011, 10:18 AM   #19
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I believe that a retiree would have problems if they do not engage in things outside the home. Work, of course, automatically requires engagement. Without work one must find ways to engage.

As E. J. Zelinkski says in his books. One must replace (in retirement).

1) The sense of community that work provide
2) The sense of purpose that work provides
3) The structure that work provides

Absent these things problems just may result.
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Old 04-26-2011, 10:23 AM   #20
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As E. J. Zelinkski says in his books. One must replace (in retirement).

1) The sense of comunity that work provide
2) The sense of purpose that work provides
3) The structure that work provides

Absent these things problems just may result.
I think there is *some* merit to this. When some people lose me is when they make it sound as if these things (sense of community, sense of purpose, structure) are *only* obtainable through traditional employment.
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