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Old 10-02-2014, 04:13 PM   #61
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Received the blast email below from our school district. It certainly is a relief knowing each school has an RN ready to do battle on the ebola front lines on our behalf.



Health and Safety Update on Ebola Preparedness

xxxxx ISD is carefully following the current Ebola health issue affecting Dallas. At this time we are not aware of any connections between the Dallas case and xxxxx ISD.

We are in close contact with local and state health authorities regarding necessary precautions and protocols. As a proactive measure, emergency management teams and local hospital officials met today to discuss community preparedness in the unlikely event that the Ebola virus spreads.

Our top priority is the health and safety of our students; therefore, we are operating at a heightened awareness of this serious health issue. All xxxxx ISD schools have a Registered Nurse (RN) who is prepared to respond to communicable diseases. Information specific to the Ebola virus has been provided to our nurses and Health Services staff.

Ebola is only transmitted by coming in direct contact with someone who is showing symptoms. Additional information about Ebola virus is available by visiting the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention website: http://www.cdc.gov/vhf/ebola/
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Old 10-02-2014, 04:20 PM   #62
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Originally Posted by DFW_M5 View Post
Should be good for Fair attendance:
Big Tex is ahead of the game. First he gets the ability to move his eyes, and arms. Probably wishes he could move his legs so he could high tail it outta here. Of course some of that fried food at the fair probably is good for stopping the ebola virus dead in its tracks once it hits your body. Ebola vs. the fried twinkie.
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Old 10-02-2014, 05:14 PM   #63
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At least for now, as far as we know.
Wouldn't matter. N95 masks will pass particles smaller than 3,000 nanometers. Ebola virus is roughly 200 nanometers (depending on folding), and as an airborne virus will nicely slip through an N95 mask. The masks also do not cover the eyes...

N95 masks are great for airborne dust control, though, which is why they are popular with disaster service workers.

Wash your hands.

Use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer (great for lipid-wrapped virii like ebola or the good ole flu.)

Avoid exposure to body fluids from suspected infected persons.

Avoid washing the recently deceased ebola patients with your bare hands. (A major vector in west Africa.)

Do not re-use bedding from former ebola patients without first properly cleaning it. Similarly, don't steal the bedding for your own use. (This is another vector. Seriously.)

Don't eat meat from diseased monkeys or fruit bats. (Yes, another vector...)

Avoid fruit bat colonies in neighborhood rain forests.
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Old 10-02-2014, 05:51 PM   #64
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I think we will know the answers in about 3 weeks for the folks in Dallas.
Since we only live about 3 hours from Dallas, I'm not feeling too comfortable. I'm sure nobody else is either, though.
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Old 10-02-2014, 06:15 PM   #65
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I heard that the man's family has been served with quarantine papers requiring them to stay in their home for a couple weeks.

Shame on that ER for missing this!!
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Old 10-02-2014, 06:26 PM   #66
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I have read a number of news articles now about ebola. One thing I have noticed that recurs frequently in the comments to those articles is speculation that ebola must be airborne because "the doctors are getting it and they wear protective clothing." In my opinion, this is a false conclusion. There is no need to posit a new infection vector; the ones we know about are quite enough.

Let me explain. Many, many years ago, before I became a lawyer, I was an engineer and operator of nuclear power plants. First in US Navy submarines and then at a commercial power plant. In connection with that work, I had numerous occasions to dress exactly like the medical personnel in West Africa and that experience convinces me that it is possible to become exposed even with the protective clothing.

In a nuclear plant, when you want to go into an area that has known or suspected radioactive contamination, you must wear anti-contamination clothing (colloquially anti-Cs or "the canary suit"). This consists of a bright yellow coverall that zips up the front, a stylish matching hood that drapes down over the shoulders, cotton booties under large rubber galoshes, cotton gloves under rubber gloves, and a full face respirator. Depending on the specific work you plan to do once in the contaminated area, you might also wear over all that a rubberized apron, rubberized gauntlets, welding gloves, roofers' knee pads, etc.

This equipment must be put on in a precise sequence because it will later be taken off in a precise sequence. The booties and boots and gloves are overlapped just so with the sleeves and ankles of the coveralls, which are then taped over with masking tape. Indeed, every single potential pathway for contamination to enter is carefully taped off, including the front zipper. Someone watches you suit up to make sure you do it right. Once you're ready, you enter the contaminated area and do your work.

In my experience, trying to work while fully suited up is miserable indeed. It is hot and uncomfortable. You can't wipe away the sweat that is trickling into your eye. You can't scratch your nose. When the respirator fogs up, you can't do anything about it. And, you have to assume that if you rip your anti-Cs, you'll get contaminated, so you have to move carefully and slowly. All in all, not fun.

Taking off the anti-Cs is the key. You must assume that there is contamination on the outside surfaces of everything you are wearing. So you follow a precise order to remove the clothing, using precisely specified movements, all of which is designed to ensure that the contamination does not get on the inside, on your underclothes or your skin. Again, you are under observation to make sure you do it right. After you are undressed, they check you all over with radiation meters to make sure that you aren't contaminated.

The people who do this work are well trained. They practice donning and doffing the anti-Cs before they do it for real. They are supervised closely. And yet, sometimes people still manage to contaminate themselves when they are taking off the suit.

Now imagine that you are a Liberian doctor with the bodily fluids from patients on your gloves, your coveralls, your boots and your goggles. You're hot and very tired. You are taking care of ebola patients because you are all that is available, not because you are specially trained for it. You are wearing protective clothes, but assume that, just once, you get sloppy in your undressing procedures and some of the fluid gets on your hand. Now you finally wipe your eyes and, boom, you're exposed to the ebola virus. And neither you nor anyone else will know when that happens. Unlike the radiation meter at the nuclear plant, you can't be scanned right on the spot to see if you are contaminated.

And, what's more, in a nuclear plant, they can also check the clothing and equipment to see if it's contaminated. If not, it can be used again. If it is contaminated, you throw it in the radioactive trash, which eventually gets buried in South Carolina. In West Africa, they have to reuse much of their equipment. Even though they spray with bleach, they have no way to ensure that there was not a spot missed and the clothing is still contaminated. Then the doctor faces a hazard even putting the clothing on.

I am convinced that it is the getting in and out of the protective clothing, especially out, that is exposing those doctors to the virus. There is simply no need to feed popular panic by positing an airborne infection vector.
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Old 10-02-2014, 06:37 PM   #67
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Reminds me of the chemical warfare protective suits we used to wear in the Air Force and that our forces are still using sometimes during combat overseas. Everything had to be removed in sequence, including the mask, glove, rubber boots etc. to avoid contamination. The suits were/are made with a charcoal inner liner. The mask was outfitted with a rubber "hood" that covered the head, shoulders & neck. I'm sure the ebola Dr's suits are higher quality than the military grade stuff, but still...I can relate to what it's like spending hours sealed up in one of those hot suits, mask, rubber gloves & boots, sweating like a dog. Didn't help when it was 100+ degrees & 98% humidity either.
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Old 10-02-2014, 08:51 PM   #68
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"No need to panic, it is not *that* contagious"

Everyone that helped the pregnant girl is either sick or dead. Everyone.

So it was reported the guy in Texas vomited outside of his building. What happens if a dog comes along and eats some of that (yes gross, but dogs do this). Then some kid pets the dog, transferring the virus to his hands, then kid rubs his eyes, puts finger up nose or in mouth (or all three). BAM! Now we have a 5 year old with the virus. He/she starts to get sick, throws up, mom cleans it up as moms do, not even considering this kid has been exposed to the Ebola victim. Now mom is sick.

But it is not that contagious
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Old 10-02-2014, 08:57 PM   #69
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Originally Posted by Gumby View Post
I have read a number of news articles now about ebola. One thing I have noticed that recurs frequently in the comments to those articles is speculation that ebola must be airborne because "the doctors are getting it and they wear protective clothing." In my opinion, this is a false conclusion. There is no need to posit a new infection vector; the ones we know about are quite enough.

Let me explain. Many, many years ago, before I became a lawyer, I was an engineer and operator of nuclear power plants. First in US Navy submarines and then at a commercial power plant. In connection with that work, I had numerous occasions to dress exactly like the medical personnel in West Africa and that experience convinces me that it is possible to become exposed even with the protective clothing.

In a nuclear plant, when you want to go into an area that has known or suspected radioactive contamination, you must wear anti-contamination clothing (colloquially anti-Cs or "the canary suit"). This consists of a bright yellow coverall that zips up the front, a stylish matching hood that drapes down over the shoulders, cotton booties under large rubber galoshes, cotton gloves under rubber gloves, and a full face respirator. Depending on the specific work you plan to do once in the contaminated area, you might also wear over all that a rubberized apron, rubberized gauntlets, welding gloves, roofers' knee pads, etc.

This equipment must be put on in a precise sequence because it will later be taken off in a precise sequence. The booties and boots and gloves are overlapped just so with the sleeves and ankles of the coveralls, which are then taped over with masking tape. Indeed, every single potential pathway for contamination to enter is carefully taped off, including the front zipper. Someone watches you suit up to make sure you do it right. Once you're ready, you enter the contaminated area and do your work.

In my experience, trying to work while fully suited up is miserable indeed. It is hot and uncomfortable. You can't wipe away the sweat that is trickling into your eye. You can't scratch your nose. When the respirator fogs up, you can't do anything about it. And, you have to assume that if you rip your anti-Cs, you'll get contaminated, so you have to move carefully and slowly. All in all, not fun.

Taking off the anti-Cs is the key. You must assume that there is contamination on the outside surfaces of everything you are wearing. So you follow a precise order to remove the clothing, using precisely specified movements, all of which is designed to ensure that the contamination does not get on the inside, on your underclothes or your skin. Again, you are under observation to make sure you do it right. After you are undressed, they check you all over with radiation meters to make sure that you aren't contaminated.

The people who do this work are well trained. They practice donning and doffing the anti-Cs before they do it for real. They are supervised closely. And yet, sometimes people still manage to contaminate themselves when they are taking off the suit.

Now imagine that you are a Liberian doctor with the bodily fluids from patients on your gloves, your coveralls, your boots and your goggles. You're hot and very tired. You are taking care of ebola patients because you are all that is available, not because you are specially trained for it. You are wearing protective clothes, but assume that, just once, you get sloppy in your undressing procedures and some of the fluid gets on your hand. Now you finally wipe your eyes and, boom, you're exposed to the ebola virus. And neither you nor anyone else will know when that happens. Unlike the radiation meter at the nuclear plant, you can't be scanned right on the spot to see if you are contaminated.

And, what's more, in a nuclear plant, they can also check the clothing and equipment to see if it's contaminated. If not, it can be used again. If it is contaminated, you throw it in the radioactive trash, which eventually gets buried in South Carolina. In West Africa, they have to reuse much of their equipment. Even though they spray with bleach, they have no way to ensure that there was not a spot missed and the clothing is still contaminated. Then the doctor faces a hazard even putting the clothing on.

I am convinced that it is the getting in and out of the protective clothing, especially out, that is exposing those doctors to the virus. There is simply no need to feed popular panic by positing an airborne infection vector.
Gumby, that is the most reasoned and informed post on Ebola that I have read in a long time. Well said!
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Old 10-02-2014, 08:59 PM   #70
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"No need to panic, it is not *that* contagious"

Everyone that helped the pregnant girl is either sick or dead. Everyone.

So it was reported the guy in Texas vomited outside of his building. What happens if a dog comes along and eats some of that (yes gross, but dogs do this). Then some kid pets the dog, transferring the virus to his hands, then kid rubs his eyes, puts finger up nose or in mouth (or all three). BAM! Now we have a 5 year old with the virus. He/she starts to get sick, throws up, mom cleans it up as moms do, not even considering this kid has been exposed to the Ebola victim. Now mom is sick.

But it is not that contagious
That is certainly a possible scenario. I hope the CDC have thought of it.
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Old 10-02-2014, 09:01 PM   #71
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Gumby, that is the most reasoned and informed post on Ebola that I have read in a long time. Well said!
But not everyone who's coming in contact with the Ebola virus is "fully suited up."
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Ebola in Texas
Old 10-02-2014, 09:22 PM   #72
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Ebola in Texas

So now a NBC American cameraman has contracted Ebola in Liberia and will be flown to US. He's one of the support staff for Dr Nancy Synderman who has been reporting from there.

http://www.cnn.com/2014/10/02/health...html?hpt=hp_t1
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Old 10-02-2014, 10:09 PM   #73
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Listening to Dr. today it CAN'T be transmitted by a few drops sweat. Not only do you contact with bodily fluid but it needs to a large quantity. For instance being vomited is a good way of catching it. But even been splashed by blood of Ebola victim doesn't mean you'll get Ebola unless you have an open sore. The immune system can handle small amount of the virus. It can even handle large amounts of the virus as long as you get proper hydration and electrolytes e.g. getting an IV drip.

Two important points he made. This is a very hard virus to transmit, there has never been a transmission of Ebola to another person outside of West Africa. 60%+ of the cases transmitted in West Africa is caused by their burial practices.Inthe Ugandan ceremonies the Hewletts witnessed, the sister of the deceased’s father is responsible for bathing, cleaning, and dressing the body in a “favorite outfit.” This task, they write, is “too emotionally painful” for the immediate family. In the event that no aunt exists, a female elder in the community takes this role on. The next step, the mourning, is where the real ceremony takes place. “Funerals are major cultural events that can last for days, depending on the status of the deceased person,” they write. As the women “wail” and the men “dance,” the community takes time to “demonstrate care and respect for the dead.” The more important the person, the longer the mourning. When the ceremony is coming to a close, a common bowl is used for ritual hand-washing, and a final touch or kiss on the face of the corpse (which is known as a “a love touch”) is bestowed on the dead. When the ceremony has concluded, the body is buried on land that directly adjoins the deceased’s house because “the family wants the spirit to be happy and not feel forgotten.”
Whatever we might think of the hygiene here, I really have to respect the love shown. The West is by contrast a pretty cold place.

Ha
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Old 10-02-2014, 11:04 PM   #74
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If this stuff mutates to a form that is easily spread i don't plan on leaving the house for quite a while.
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Old 10-02-2014, 11:19 PM   #75
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Before the thunderstorm line came through late afternoon, a work crew was power-washing the concrete outside of the subjects apartment building. I don't know if that is a good idea, or not.

The number of people possibly exposed is climbing. A few kids were pulled from a Richardson ISD school today, as it was determined they were in the contact chain.

NBC Evening News had a story by Dr. Nancy Snyderman, from the subject's neighborhood just outside of Monrovia, Liberia. She interviewed the cab driver. No one would help the very sick pregnant woman who was unable to walk by herself, but the subject got her into the cab, and sat next to her in the back seat. The cab driver said he did not help her in, he was afraid to. They drove to four different hospitals, all hospitals said there was nothing they could do. They took her back to her house, within eyesight of where the subject lived. She died 2 hrs. later.
Please note that no burial rituals were involved, no kissing, etc. etc.

I read a op-ed today from a Dr. who decried all of the "happy happy" talk from health officials, and the talk of a vaccine will take care of it. He said a vaccine is at least a year away. I read it on a website where it was an imbedded story, I could not link to it to copy it here. I believe it may have written into a USA Today.

This is all happening not that far from me. I used to have some business in an office building right across WH Lane from the THPD complex.
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Old 10-03-2014, 06:29 AM   #76
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a work crew was power-washing the concrete outside of the subjects apartment building.
Assuming they used a bleach solution, I hope it was OK.

In an apartment complex, there was probably a pay washer, where someone brought the sheets and washed them. And the guy walked in and out several times over the five days he showed symptoms I would guess. He rode the elevator, pushed the buttons. Probably used the entry buzzer system, as he was just a visitor, unless his sister gave him a key.

If she was my tenant, and she did not tell me ahead of time he was coming, she would be looking for a new place to live when her lease was up. This will be expensive for the landlord.

I can only assume the guy figured he was going to catch Ebola, and knew it was safe to come here to get treated. Others, as they are exposed, will come here before they actually get symptoms, in case they actually get the virus.
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Old 10-03-2014, 06:36 AM   #77
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Everyone that helped the pregnant girl is either sick or dead. Everyone.
Apparently the taxi driver is still alive.
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Old 10-03-2014, 08:35 AM   #78
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It just gets better and better... it's all under control...

Quote:
When Mr. Duncan, 42, was first taken to the emergency room at Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital on Sept. 25, he was examined and sent home with antibiotics by doctors who apparently did not suspect Ebola. A nurse had learned from Mr. Duncan that he had traveled from Liberia, one of three African countries where the virus is rampant, but that detail apparently was not communicated to the rest of his medical team, hospital officials said.
The woman with whom Mr. Duncan was staying told CNN that she had been with him the first time he sought treatment at the hospital and that she had twice emphatically told workers there he had been in Liberia.
from the article:
Delay in Dallas Ebola Cleanup as Workers Balk at Task

Read the article above also about cleanup problems at the apartment. Gee, who woulda thunk it that most cleanup companies won't touch this!
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Old 10-03-2014, 08:44 AM   #79
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...you get sloppy in your undressing procedures...

I am convinced that it is the getting in and out of the protective clothing, especially out, that is exposing those doctors to the virus. There is simply no need to feed popular panic by positing an airborne infection vector.
Excellent point. That's probably it.
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Old 10-03-2014, 08:46 AM   #80
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And the guy lied at the airport in Liberia about his exposure.

Of course he has no U.S. based health insurance, and probably has no health insurance. The hospital has to eat the cost of his care.


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