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Old 01-27-2013, 07:48 PM   #21
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One of my favorite places for breakfast is The Cracker Barrel and just happened to visit one today. I am what is called a "meat and potatoes" guy but today I added a few other things as usual. Uncle Herchels(?) Favorite is my thing. Two eggs easy over, 8 oz hamburger steak, grits, hash browns, biscuits and gravy. Once in awhile I'll have catfish instead of the hamburger steak. Yum! Better double up on the Simvastatin tonight.

I'm remembering back in the good old days when Mom used to fry the eggs in bacon grease. Always kept a old coffee can on the stove to hold the left over grease ("drippings" we called it). In those days we also ate a meat dish we called "grits" but it was a pork base with pin oats, a German dish. Fried it in the bacon drippings. I've seen it in stores called "goetta" and it may have also been called "spec". That stuff was really good but I haven't had it in 60 years.

By todays standards and thinking, I can't believe I'm still alive.
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Old 01-27-2013, 07:53 PM   #22
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Don't mean to start a bruhaha, but most early large studies of cholesterol & vascular health were flawed. Not designed to account for fact that blood effects of eating more cholesterol vary between individuals, and that there are good and bad forms. Besides dietary cholesterol, cholesterol is also produced by the body. Some folks cut out essentially all the bad stuff & their blood panels do not change... so drug treatment is considered. In others diet change (& proper exercise) improves things so drugs are not needed. In any case, never substitute anything you read on the 'net for sound medical advice

FWIW- Over the years, & more blood tests than I care to count, I find eating 1-2 eggs once per week is OK but 3-4x/wk consistently and I see it in my next blood panel. And I know folks who tightly control their diet to no avail, while others seem to eat whatever they like with no bad effect on their blood panels. Sometimes cholesterol, like life, just ain't fair.

And I don't eat EggBeaters 'cause they taste funny :0
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Old 01-27-2013, 08:25 PM   #23
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I watched a very interesting documentary about a year ago that provided what I thought to be extremely compelling evidence that the entire cholesterol theory was flawed from it's beginnings in the 1950's and that the overuse of statins was excessive. The real dangers from diet are in sugars, according to this particular documentary.

I know lots of doctors. Literally a couple thousand of them. I haven't talked to one yet that would tell me eggs are bad for me. In fact, many of them are convinced that eggs are an almost perfect food that got a bad rap for a couple of decades.

I'm going to try and find that name of that documentary......
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Old 01-27-2013, 08:28 PM   #24
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FOUND IT!

The documentary is called "FatHead" and there's a blog/website:

Fat Head About the Film
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Old 01-27-2013, 08:31 PM   #25
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In case you miss this section, here are some interesting points from the website:
  • There’s never been a single study that proves saturated fat causes heart disease.
  • As heart-disease rates were skyrocketing in the mid-1900s, consumption of animal fat was going down, not up. Consumption of vegetable oils, however, was going up dramatically.
  • Half of all heart-attack victims have normal or low cholesterol. Autopsies performed on heart-attack victims routinely reveal plaque-filled arteries in people whose cholesterol was low (as low as 115 in one case).
  • Asian Indians – half of whom are vegetarians – have one of the highest rates of heart disease in the entire world. Yup, that fatty meat will kill you, all right.
  • When Morgan Spurlock tells you that a McDonald’s salad supplies almost a day’s allowance of fat, he’s basing that statement on the FDA’s low-fat/high-carbohydrate dietary guidelines, which in turn are based on … absolutely nothing. There’s no science behind those guidelines; they were simply made up by a congressional committee.
  • Kids who were diagnosed as suffering from ADD have been successfully treated by re-introducing natural saturated fats into their diets. Your brain is made largely of fat.
  • Many epileptics have reduced or eliminated seizures by adopting a diet low in sugar and starch and high in saturated animal fats.
  • Despite everything you’ve heard about saturated fat being linked to cancer, that link is statistically weak. However, there is a strong link between sugar and cancer. In Europe, doctors tell patients, “Sugar feeds cancer.”
  • Being fat is not, in and of itself, bad for your health. The behaviors that can make you fat – eating excess sugar and starch, not getting any exercise – can also ruin your health, and that’s why being fat is associated with bad health. But it’s entirely possible to be fat and healthy. It’s also possible to be thin while developing Type II diabetes and heart disease.
  • Saturated fat and cholesterol help produce testosterone. When men limit their saturated fat, their testosterone level drops. So, regardless of what a famous vegan chef believes, saturated fat does not impair sexual performance.
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Old 01-27-2013, 08:50 PM   #26
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Not disagreeing or agreeing with the general conclusions but

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Originally Posted by LakeTravis View Post
[LIST][*]Theres never been a single study that proves saturated fat causes heart disease.
Studies of humans can never prove anything because they are not double-blind and randomized (the only way to show causality). However, I'm surprised there aren't such studies for animal models (like rats). Or maybe there are but the website didn't reference them? Now I'm curious as to what the animal models would show.

Quote:
[*]Asian Indians half of whom are vegetarians have one of the highest rates of heart disease in the entire world. Yup, that fatty meat will kill you, all right.
I don't think this is a valid point since there is a tremendous amount of butter/ghee in the diet.

Quote:
[*]Being fat is not, in and of itself, bad for your health. The behaviors that can make you fat eating excess sugar and starch, not getting any exercise can also ruin your health, and thats why being fat is associated with bad health. But its entirely possible to be fat and healthy. Its also possible to be thin while developing Type II diabetes and heart disease.
Is there a distinction between "fat" and "obese" here? Obesity contributes to many comorbidities and there's lots and lots of evidence for this.
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Old 01-27-2013, 09:45 PM   #27
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I watch the health news pretty closely. It seems that this week eggs are good for us. Who knows about next week.
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Old 01-28-2013, 11:33 AM   #28
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FOUND IT!

The documentary is called "FatHead" and there's a blog/website:

Fat Head About the Film
Entertainment, not science.
I'll leave it at that.
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Old 01-28-2013, 05:17 PM   #29
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I like eggs over easy with some grits, scrambled with a little cheese, or as whole grain french toast and eat about 8 or so a week. My garden likes the egg shells too. My only concern is what the chickens are fed that produce the eggs. But I can't control that at the moment. Maybe in the future when I slow down enough to where I have to stay home more then I will get a couple of chickens. Just call me Jethro.

Cheers!
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Old 01-28-2013, 05:57 PM   #30
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Some here may shoot me down for saying so, but one key reference you should use is the American Heart Association. They have a great website too.


Quote:
Originally Posted by easysurfer

But, what's the truth about the health benefits/hazards of eggs?

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Old 01-28-2013, 06:12 PM   #31
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Some here may shoot me down for saying so, but one key reference you should use is the American Heart Association. They have a great website too.
I don't believe anyone here would shoot you down for any reason.
But what bothers me is that I can't find any evidence at the AHA site for their strong recommendation to severely limit dietary cholesterol.

I can go the the webmd.com site and find this:
Quote:
Cholesterol and the Great Egg Debate

One source of confusion has long been eggs. A typical egg contains about 200 milligrams of cholesterol, but only 1.5 grams of saturated fat. When researchers first linked high blood cholesterol levels to heart disease, eggs got a bad rap.

But there's never been good evidence that eggs are a major factor in high blood cholesterol levels or a contributing cause of heart disease.

In fact, when researchers at Harvard Medical School analyzed data from almost 120,000 men and women, they found that eating the equivalent of an egg a day did not increase the risk of heart disease or stroke. A more recent Harvard Medical School study, published in 2008, also found that otherwise healthy men could eat up to seven eggs a day with little risk. The only danger showed up in men with diabetes, which is known to increase heart disease risk.
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Old 01-28-2013, 06:42 PM   #32
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As a working mom of school age kids I've discovered that they do better in school if they have protein for breakfast. Some mornings (when we're rushed) that's a cliff bar. Other mornings it's scrambled eggs, or a hard boiled egg chopped up with cheese in a burrito.

Same with me - my brain seems to function better if I have protein for breakfast.

Since the boys and I have low cholesterol levels, I don't worry about it. We go through a dozen eggs a week.

My husband has higher cholesterol - so he avoids eggs. I've told him he's nuts. He agrees - and eats a handful of walnuts or pistachios. That's his preferred morning protein.

Eggs are yummy. Eggs are laden with nutrients. Eggs are cheap. I'll reconsider if I ever develop high cholesterol... but so far that's a non issue.
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Old 01-28-2013, 07:08 PM   #33
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I have bad cholesterol numbers 240 total and HDL only 30. All my other blood work is perfect. 44yo male about 15% body fat and BMI 22. I have gone from the low fat high grain diet to a paleo diet. No change in the numbers. For my sample size of 1 eggs made no difference. By the way between myself my wife and my 2 pre-teen girls we eat 2 to 3 dozen eggs a week. All my wife's numbers are excellent.
If you like eggs eat them.
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Old 01-28-2013, 07:57 PM   #34
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Funny you should mention this. MIL has eaten 2 loaves of bread a week for years. Now 84, she researches health issues 24/7 and came to the conclusion last week that bread is not good. She quit cold turkey a few months ago and feels a lot better.
I don't think I would care at that point
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Old 01-30-2013, 04:16 AM   #35
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I have been around a LONG time and vividly remember when a great uncle was diagnosed w/heart disease. NOTE: this is 50-55 years ago.

He was told:
drop butter for margerine
NO eggs
No shrimp, crab, lobster

ALL of these things have changed. Now butter is better because of notransfats. Eggs are ok (in reasonable amounts). Shellfish is as good as many other fish.

I believe the approach should be 'everything in moderation.' I even do red meat - once a week when I can afford it.
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Old 01-30-2013, 05:29 AM   #36
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I believe the approach should be 'everything in moderation.' I even do red meat - once a week when I can afford it.
+1
I would be more concerned with all the prepared foods (and not just the sugary drinks, pastries, candy etc.) that contain sugar. That would be most anything that is'nt a fresh whole food. The large amounts of excess sugar that is quickly absorbed into the body and not burned off is converted to saturated fat which is what our bodies uses to make into cholesterol.
I think I will enjoy the eggs I have a few times a week. marvholly has the right plan.
I use the Goldilocks approach to eating. Moderation = not too much and not too little but just the right amount of eating a variety of fresh whole foods. If a variety of whole fresh foods are eaten that will pretty much take care of moderation without having to think.

Cheers!
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Old 01-30-2013, 06:40 AM   #37
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+1
I would be more concerned with all the prepared foods (and not just the sugary drinks, pastries, candy etc.) that contain sugar. That would be most anything that is'nt a fresh whole food. The large amounts of excess sugar that is quickly absorbed into the body and not burned off is converted to saturated fat which is what our bodies uses to make into cholesterol.
I think I will enjoy the eggs I have a few times a week. marvholly has the right plan.
I use the Goldilocks approach to eating. Moderation = not too much and not too little but just the right amount of eating a variety of fresh whole foods. If a variety of whole fresh foods are eaten that will pretty much take care of moderation without having to think.

Cheers!
+2

I stopped eating lunchmeat years ago when I realized how many chemicals it must take to keep meat edible for that long. Since then, I've also stopped drinking soda (used to drink a two-liter of Pepsi a day) and had switched to fruit juices when I realized they weren't much better for you because of all the sugars. Now I'm down to water in a pitcher with lemon or orange slices.

I'm eating more fish and shrimp, more chicken and less red meat, more brocolli, celery, carrots, and cucumbers, egss and cheese and nuts, less breads and sweets......and I really do feel much better than I did years ago.
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Old 01-30-2013, 07:18 AM   #38
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Now butter is better because of no transfats.
Lard and Tallow is even better for you. I still eat lots of butter but more Lard now days. (Ghee -- butter without the milk solids --, however, is equivalent to lard/tallow and is easy to make with a microwave.)

Lard: The New Health Food?

Quote:
Extending this astonishing offer was the food writer Corby Kummer. In response to the news that New York City's health commissioner had asked local restaurants to stop using cooking oils containing trans fats, comparing them to such hazards as lead and asbestos, Kummer proposed that we bring back lard, "the great misunderstood fat." Lard, he cheerfully reported, contains just 40 percent saturated fat (compared with nearly 60 percent for butter). Its level of monounsaturated fat (the "good" fat) is "a very respectable 45 percent," he noted, "double butter's paltry 23 or so percent." Kummer hinted that if I wanted to appreciate the virtues of this health food, I needed to fry shoestring potatoes or a chicken drumstick.
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Old 01-30-2013, 03:29 PM   #39
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This is all very confusing.

The only thing that is certain is that the above article made we want a nice plate of fried chicken followed by an apple pie with a lard crust.
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Old 02-02-2013, 05:17 AM   #40
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personally, I tend to shop the perimeter of stores - produce, meat/fish, dairy and maybe bakery.

I seldom drink soda: water, coffee & white wine are my choices.

My 'lunch meat' choices tend to be mostly sliced turkey w/ham or roast beef sometimes.

Yep, I DO eat a junk food meal (corn beef, pizzia, hot dogs,.....) once a week and and have chips on special occasdsions like NYE & Super Bowl.
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