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Old 04-22-2015, 03:43 PM   #21
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DWs Practitioner called this White Coat Syndrome. She would often go in and her BP would be through the roof and her heart rate in the 160 range. The Practitioner would always redo those tests at the end of the checkup and they'd both be back to the high normal range by then.
I also have an accelerated pulse in the doctor's office. I can't seem to help it.
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Old 04-22-2015, 03:53 PM   #22
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I have a couple of polar devices. One is a chest strap and wristwatch that can be used to monitor heart rate while traveling anywhere.

I recently got a polar7 that will talk to my iPad via Bluetooth. I can then watch my heart rate and graph on the app while I'm doing an aerobics/weight routine at home. Once I'm done it summarizes time in each zone and sends the data up to the web where I can view the graph and details from the polar site as well as my history.
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Old 04-22-2015, 05:16 PM   #23
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I have a couple of polar devices. One is a chest strap and wristwatch that can be used to monitor heart rate while traveling anywhere.

I recently got a polar7 that will talk to my iPad via Bluetooth. I can then watch my heart rate and graph on the app while I'm doing an aerobics/weight routine at home. Once I'm done it summarizes time in each zone and sends the data up to the web where I can view the graph and details from the polar site as well as my history.
That is pretty neat, we'll have to look into something like that when we get back.
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Old 04-22-2015, 06:21 PM   #24
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No commenting on Alan's specific program, but one thing to remember is that it takes high motivation to do this kind of intervals. ( High work to rest ratio.) They are highly aversive!, at least compared to just cruising along.

Ha
My problem is I get boooo-ooo-ooored so easily just 'cruising along', I never stick with it. I'm starting to get into some of these routines like the '7 minute' apps on android/ios, where you do something for a minute, switch to something else. So far, not enough time to get bored.

It's not much compared to what most people do for a work-out, but I'm convinced it is better than nothing - and that's what I end up doing if I get bored.

Everyone's different, but when I see people on a treadmill, or jogging, or anything repetitive, I just shake my head - that is like torture to me. Big Brother would have threatened me with the treadmill!

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Old 04-22-2015, 07:57 PM   #25
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Congratulations on lowering your BP. The exercise program you are doing is basically one type of HIIT (High Intensity Interval Training). Quite a bit has been written about this approach over the last few years, and it does seem to work for a lot of people (including me). I first tried it a few years back, but my method is a little different - instead of doing my usual daily 30-40 minute brisk walk, I walk briskly for 10 minutes, sprint for a minute, walk for another 10 minutes, spring again, and so on. And I try to do at least one of the sprints uphill, which really gets the heart rate up. I had marginally-high BP at one point also, and I managed to get it down to normal levels using both diet (trying to eliminate most processed foods) and this HIIT walk/sprint routine that I do. I also do some strength training, but I think the main things responsible for the BP reduction were the HIIT and changes to diet. I also lost some weight after doing these things for just a few months, which I needed to lose.

Here is one short article on HIIT (you can easily find more by a simple Google search): 5 Fat-Burning HIIT Workouts for Any Fitness Level | BodyHack Fitness Blog

Even if you only have 5-10 minutes each day to exercise, you can do HIIT. The main thing is that you have to get your heart rate up to at least 80% of capacity for a brief period (even a minute or less will help). The positive effects on the body will continue for hours after your workout is over, or so the research shows.
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Old 04-22-2015, 07:57 PM   #26
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A few weeks ago we watched a program called "The truth about fat" and one of the things they showed was that the best way to burn fat is to exercise hard and slow in a ratio of 2-1. Their volunteers wore a mask connected to equipment on their back and ran for 40 seconds, walked 20, and they could accurately measure how many calories were being burned. They did this for 20 minutes, and unlike running for 20 minutes the increased calorie burn rate continued for hours afterwards. Several times a week I exercise on an elliptical trainer and I tend to keep up a steady fast pace, get my heart rate up and sweat it out for 30 minutes.


So, I thought I'd try this new regime to see if I could lose some weight (I'm 6'1" and 178lbs).
Exercise helps with weight loss, but 80% of body composition is a result of what you eat. It will definitely help, but as the saying goes, "you can't out exercise bad nutrition". I dropped weight by eating right, dropped some more by exercising, but when I worked with a nutritionist and ate according to her guidelines and added in some extra interval cardio is when I got very slim (roughly 10% body fat now).

It's anecdotal, but I've been observing success stories and failures in the gym for several years now. The people who do nothing but cardio (usually the long slow kind) never lose weight. And the people who lift weight, do some cardio, and are strict about their nutrition are the ones who get slim. My bodybuilder friends follow the latter model and they get down into the single digits using that method. They can't maintain that low of a level for very long (usually a two week window around a competition), but they usually stay in the high single digits.

Interestingly, while exercise has helped me with my high blood pressure, I still take a pill every other day. I took a month off and it steadily climbed back up. I may try again and go low sodium, but I like salt in my food and am not ready to give it up yet.
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Old 04-22-2015, 08:14 PM   #27
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when I worked with a nutritionist and ate according to her guidelines and added in some extra interval cardio is when I got very slim (roughly 10% body fat now).

Interestingly, while exercise has helped me with my high blood pressure, I still take a pill every other day. I took a month off and it steadily climbed back up. I may try again and go low sodium, but I like salt in my food and am not ready to give it up yet.
If you don't mind sharing, I'm curious as to what kind of nutritional guidelines your nutritionist has provided for you. In my case, when I cut out most processed foods and starting eating mostly whole, real foods (lots of vegetables, grass-fed meat, fish, plenty of healthy fats (butter, olive oil, coconut oil), some fruit (especially berries), some nuts), my BP came right down to normal levels, and has stayed down for several years now. I have noticed that salt is not a factor at all.......I use salt (sea salt) on foods to taste, with no real limitations, and it has not raised my BP one iota. I understand that some people may be sensitive to sodium, but apparently quite a few people like me are not affected at all by it.
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Old 04-22-2015, 08:23 PM   #28
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Ok. More clear now. I try to keep it between 80% and 90% but have nothing against going to 95% momentarily just as I reach the end of the interval. As long as I don't try to do that on a sustained basis. I do monitor my exertion output once I hit the 80%. During the later sets I do not push it to max out anything. I will modulate the exercise to keep from overspeeding if I have to.

Max heart rate has a formula I know. However last year I did a stress echocardiogram where I had to get my heart as fast as I could, and I got it into the 180s (I'm 58) so it sort of made a mockery of the formula. So what really is the max heart rate we talk about, the 180s that I "maxed" out at, or 162 (formula: 220 - age) ?


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Old 04-22-2015, 08:40 PM   #29
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I also have an accelerated pulse in the doctor's office. I can't seem to help it.
I've got the same problem. They've started taking my BP when I come in, then taking it again just before I leave. The difference is usually 10-20/10 pts. I have no explanation, as I don't feel particularly nervous when I get there.
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Old 04-22-2015, 08:56 PM   #30
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If you don't mind sharing, I'm curious as to what kind of nutritional guidelines your nutritionist has provided for you. In my case, when I cut out most processed foods and starting eating mostly whole, real foods (lots of vegetables, grass-fed meat, fish, plenty of healthy fats (butter, olive oil, coconut oil), some fruit (especially berries), some nuts), my BP came right down to normal levels, and has stayed down for several years now. I have noticed that salt is not a factor at all.......I use salt (sea salt) on foods to taste, with no real limitations, and it has not raised my BP one iota. I understand that some people may be sensitive to sodium, but apparently quite a few people like me are not affected at all by it.
We eat the same way. I've been eating liking that for years, and was before I worked with the nutritionist.

What she did, as best as I can determine, was a metabolism reset diet. It included eating five times a day, no meal closer than one hour to the other, and no meals farther apart than four hours. Two meals could include a protein shake. No dairy, and the meats had to be lean. And of course no fast food, no junk food, etc., but I was already eating that way.

Other than that, the only other guidance she gave was to dictate the macro nutrients for the meals. I weighed in each week using a scale that also reads body fat, body water, etc. I started out with what I thought were a lot of carbs (I was eating oatmeal at breakfast and fruit, and rice with other meals), but was pretty balanced between carbs, fat and protein. I wasn't used to eating that many carbs, and actually had trouble staying on the diet because I was never hungry. It stayed that way for a month or more before she began to make changes. Over a period of several months she began to take the carbs away and started adding in interval cardio. Then there were days were there were no carbs, and then there were strings of day with no carbs (other than a lot of green veggies). Every now and then she would tell me to have a cheat meal, which consisted of eating whatever I wanted in a 45 minute window.

I almost never felt hungry, never had cravings (although I loved the cheat meals), and lost 20 pounds of fat while gaining a couple of pounds of muscle.

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Max heart rate has a formula I know. However last year I did a stress echocardiogram where I had to get my heart as fast as I could, and I got it into the 180s (I'm 58) so it sort of made a mockery of the formula. So what really is the max heart rate we talk about, the 180s that I "maxed" out at, or 162 (formula: 220 - age) ?
I looked it up a few years ago and found some good arguments debunking the 220-age formula. I don't recall the specifics, but according to what I read that formula was based on some bad science and a flawed study.

I did a resting and exercising metabolism test a couple of years ago and was given my max heart rate. It was a good twenty bpm greater than the theoretical one. If that formula was any good my heart should have blown up a few years ago.

I wear a heart monitor to track calories, average bpm, and max bpm during a session. The only time I really watch my heart rate is when I'm recovering from something high intensity, and when I'm trying to do something low intensity. When I'm going all out I never worry about how high it gets - my body will tell me when I'm going too hard. Usually in the mid 170's I will get gassed and have to walk around for a minute to catch my breath, and that only happens when I'm doing something super high intensity. My trainer said you will pass out before you die so I don't worry about it - and so far he's been right.

That formula has messed up a lot of people. I know that the cardio I did years ago was mostly worthless compared to what I do now because I believed in that stupid sticker you see on every cardio machine in every gym.
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Old 04-22-2015, 09:08 PM   #31
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Dr. Michael Mosley has done some great diet and exercise programmes here is one about high impact, short duration exercise

The Truth About Exercise - Video Dailymotion
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Old 04-22-2015, 09:49 PM   #32
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That is pretty neat, we'll have to look into something like that when we get back.
I like having the big display on my iPad when I'm working out. But I'm half expecting the polar7 to fail before long. I don't think they have all the bugs worked out yet. Be sure to read the reviews.
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Old 04-22-2015, 09:56 PM   #33
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I've got the same problem. They've started taking my BP when I come in, then taking it again just before I leave. The difference is usually 10-20/10 pts. I have no explanation, as I don't feel particularly nervous when I get there.
I do feel it. I think there is some feedback and I try to remain calm but I can feel a little anxiety building. It feeds on itself.

I hadn't thought about checking it again when I leave.

A large reason (not the only one) I do the routine blood pressure checking is to have a history to report to the doctors if concern is expressed.

That's how I knew it had crept up the last couple of years. And I had started to get a little concerned when readings in the 130s became common.

I also know that yoga will drop it - about 15 mins after even a brief yoga session it's usually down 10 points.
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Old 04-22-2015, 10:21 PM   #34
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I lost 40lb back in 2002 when I changed my diet and started exercising, including weight training. I have no doubt in my own mind that weight loss is mostly to do with diet. I have maintained my new weight this last 13 years through diet and I've kept up a good exercise regime, although I haven't tried the HIIT before. Until a year ago I used to play singles tennis which is pretty close, I thought, to interval training, and I would wear my heart monitor to see how high my HR would get.

When I started this HIIT exercise a few weeks ago I really never expected such a positive effect on my BP since I was already exercising vigorously and regularly, and even in the years playing tennis twice a week I still had borderline high BP.
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Old 04-22-2015, 10:27 PM   #35
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Max heart rate has a formula I know. However last year I did a stress echocardiogram where I had to get my heart as fast as I could, and I got it into the 180s (I'm 58) so it sort of made a mockery of the formula. So what really is the max heart rate we talk about, the 180s that I "maxed" out at, or 162 (formula: 220 - age) ?


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At any age you can push your actual heart rate beyond that 220 minus age thing. The 220 minus - Age is just sort of a convenient contrivance to frame safe exercise parameters for one's age.
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Old 04-22-2015, 10:46 PM   #36
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I have a couple of polar devices. One is a chest strap and wristwatch that can be used to monitor heart rate while traveling anywhere.

I recently got a polar7 that will talk to my iPad via Bluetooth. I can then watch my heart rate and graph on the app while I'm doing an aerobics/weight routine at home. Once I'm done it summarizes time in each zone and sends the data up to the web where I can view the graph and details from the polar site as well as my history.
I lost the monitor to my Polar FT7 on Saturday. Today I bought a Polar H7. I was pleased to learn that the new H7 monitor is backward compatible with my Polar FT7 watch. I can use both the watch and my Galaxy phone to view my results.

It was interesting to see there was a difference in calories burned between the Galaxy phone app and my watch. My height, weight, age and gender were the same for both.

I had been keeping a food and fitness diary on paper for the last 3 or so months. Today I started logging everything on myfitnesspal.com I love that app! So far the database has everything I've eaten in the last two days included. I'll have to see if I can find an app to use with my Polar H7 and myfitnesspal.com
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Old 04-22-2015, 11:51 PM   #37
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The GymBoss can be a heartless task master. Sprinting is good.

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Old 04-23-2015, 07:36 AM   #38
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For me, I get far more benefit from doing wind sprints vs lengthy jogging. I suspect alternating days between wind sprints and a long slow walk the next will provide excellent health benefits. Wind sprints will build muscle vs long jogs doing the opposite. Agree with Leonidas, that what you eat will be the biggest determinant in what you look like physically (exercise will not give you a 6 pack).
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Old 04-23-2015, 08:30 AM   #39
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What she did, as best as I can determine, was a metabolism reset diet. It included eating five times a day, no meal closer than one hour to the other, and no meals farther apart than four hours. Two meals could include a protein shake. No dairy, and the meats had to be lean. And of course no fast food, no junk food, etc., but I was already eating that way.
Interesting, thanks.

Sounds like the major difference between my diet and yours is (perhaps) the amount of healthy fats I consume. I consume a lot of healthy fats (olive oil, grass-fed butter, coconut oil, avocado oil, tallow, full-fat cheeses). I wouldn't say that the meat I consume is "lean" either, but it is almost all grass-fed meat. It seems counter-intuitive to a lot of people, but if anything, I'm convinced that consuming those things (in addition to giving up most processed foods) actually helped me lose some weight, and (in combination with some HIIT and a little bit of strength training) increase muscle mass and lower overall body fat. I'm pretty sure it was responsible for lowering my BP to normal levels also.

You've probably read a lot of stuff about diet and BP already, but here are a couple of short articles you may want to check out. The first is on ways to reduce BP through diet, and the second is on salt in the diet, and why reducing salt consumption may not be such a great idea for most people.

6 Ways To Lower Blood Pressure By Changing Your Diet

Is Salt Healthy? | Mark's Daily Apple
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Old 04-23-2015, 10:19 AM   #40
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Interesting, thanks.

Sounds like the major difference between my diet and yours is (perhaps) the amount of healthy fats I consume. I consume a lot of healthy fats (olive oil, grass-fed butter, coconut oil, avocado oil, tallow, full-fat cheeses). I wouldn't say that the meat I consume is "lean" either, but it is almost all grass-fed meat. It seems counter-intuitive to a lot of people, but if anything, I'm convinced that consuming those things (in addition to giving up most processed foods) actually helped me lose some weight, and (in combination with some HIIT and a little bit of strength training) increase muscle mass and lower overall body fat. I'm pretty sure it was responsible for lowering my BP to normal levels also.

You've probably read a lot of stuff about diet and BP already, but here are a couple of short articles you may want to check out. The first is on ways to reduce BP through diet, and the second is on salt in the diet, and why reducing salt consumption may not be such a great idea for most people.

6 Ways To Lower Blood Pressure By Changing Your Diet

Is Salt Healthy? | Mark's Daily Apple
More good links, thanks.
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