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Old 05-19-2015, 11:53 AM   #21
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Bacon is gluten-free!!
And low-carb, too.

I agree that for most people who aren't trying to manage celiac disease, gluten-free is another trend that's not really going to make them thinner and better-looking. A friend from HS made an interesting observation, though: she doesn't have celiac disease but claims that she feels much better on a gluten-free or low-gluten diet. When she went on a trip to Slovenia, she found that the baked goods there didn't aggravate her system like the ones here. Count me among the Food Conspiracy Theorists if you will, but I wouldn't be surprised if it were due to less processing and simpler ingredients in the food in Slovenia.


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For example, years ago we had food with real ingredients like sugar and natural flavor. The manufacturers, in our best interest, undoubtedly, "improved" their foods with high fructose corn syrup, artificial flavor, hydrogenated oils etc.

Did they charge us less? If so, I didn't notice.

When we finally complained and started wanting the real (or more real) food that we used to have, they raised their prices yet again (?) or shrunk package sizes.

Yeah, I have to laugh at the proliferation of "No High-Fructose Corn Syrup!" and "No Trans Fats!" labels from manufacturers who quietly started using those ingredients years ago and are now removing them. It's not that they were doing anything wrong before, mind you, just that customer preferences have changed. Sure.
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Old 05-19-2015, 12:52 PM   #22
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...

Did they charge us less? If so, I didn't notice.

...
I think if you do some research, you'll see that the percent of US household budget that goes to food has declined through the years. So yes, I think they did charge us less, regardless whether you noticed or not.

Please note, I'm not defending nor promoting any of their actions, just pointing out what I believe is a fact. Here's a reference:

http://www.bls.gov/opub/uscs/report991.pdf

BTW, what's wrong with HFCS, as opposed to other sugars (which I do think we should limit in our diets)? The ratio of fructose to glucose in HFCS is about the same as in honey.

-ERD50
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Old 05-19-2015, 01:22 PM   #23
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BTW, what's wrong with HFCS, as opposed to other sugars (which I do think we should limit in our diets)? The ratio of fructose to glucose in HFCS is about the same as in honey.

-ERD50
And about the same as table sugar.

Some biochemists, who unlike most MDs and epidemiologists are able to understand metabolism, feel that the new demon of sugar is just a ploy to take attention away from overall carbohydrate in the diet. The phrase "healthy whole grains" is just like "artery clogging saturated fats"- mainly intended to manipulate, not to illuminate. Another great one is "industrially processed oils". I think it depends on exactly what we are talking about, but it is likely that industrial processing of foodstuffs has saved a lot of lives that bacterial and other contamination took a century ago. Add this manipulative phrase to the list- "real food". Do these people think that sugar is not real? They should go to any humid tropical lowland and look at sugar cane growing. Sure looks real to me. As do the limitless expanses of sugar beets seen in eastern North Dakota.

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Old 05-19-2015, 01:30 PM   #24
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Mexican is pretty safe.
Except for those flour tortillas!

But yes, in general, you it's easier in a Mexican place than most.
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Old 05-19-2015, 01:47 PM   #25
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The "Gluten Free!!!", "GMOs..NO!!!" craze just makes me laugh. My grandparents cooked EVERYTHING with a dollop of bacon grease for "added flavor". My Grandmother did die at 80 (COPD) but my Grandad is still going strong at 88.


Anyway, there is a talk show host that is on a tirade about food....he's all about gluten free and has all but DEMANDED that Waffle House make their waffles gluten free. Somehow, he doesn't seem to understand EXACTLY what he is asking for.
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Old 05-19-2015, 02:16 PM   #26
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There are proteins other than gluten in wheat, and, for that matter, one can be allergic to wheat, but not specifically sensitive to gluten.

I don't have any discernible problems with wheat products, but I think the focus on eating grains, whole or otherwise, is wrong-headed.
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Old 05-19-2015, 02:54 PM   #27
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There are people with celiac and gluten intolerances that don't even know it. DW suffered for years with digestive issues before discovering she had celiac. Its not a joke for these folks, but if you don't have any of those afflictions, it probably makes no difference to you. Still much better to eat natural non-processed foods.
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Old 05-19-2015, 02:57 PM   #28
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Well, I just did my weekly lunch out with hubby (DH). Wendy burger and small frosty. I will die yet a day or two earlier.
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Old 05-19-2015, 03:31 PM   #29
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I know a couple of people with celiac disorder. Gluten is poison to them. They love the anti-gluten fad because it's greatly expanded their food choices.
+1. My younger brother was diagnosed with celiac disorder over 20 years ago and the current fad has benefited him with much broader labeling in the grocery stores. As others have mentioned, restaurants are pretty much off limits.
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Old 05-19-2015, 03:51 PM   #30
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Only a small percentage of people have trouble with gluten. I feel it's just a new $$$$$ fad for people who are not affected.
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Old 05-19-2015, 04:41 PM   #31
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Originally Posted by HFWR View Post
There are proteins other than gluten in wheat, and, for that matter, one can be allergic to wheat, but not specifically sensitive to gluten.

I don't have any discernible problems with wheat products, but I think the focus on eating grains, whole or otherwise, is wrong-headed.
Consumer Reports came out with a rather scathing article criticizing the "gluten-free" food fad. And many of their points were appropriate.

But then they kind of went off the deep end by emphasizing how important it was to get nutrients and fiber from whole wheat grains. As if wheat were essential, and the only source of certain nutrients and fiber. Bunk.

They were also afraid that people would be eating too much rice, and a lot of the US rice supply is high in arsenic. A person can be careful in their rice sources.
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Old 05-19-2015, 04:43 PM   #32
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I bought pineapple juice at Haggen and they had a sign that said "Gluten Free"

People are so crazy now with marketing.

After seeing that, I tricked my wife by pointing to the bottled water and saying "wow, gluten free water"!
I've been dealing with celiac disease for going on 30 years now. It isn't that bad for me but I've gotten good at reading ingredients lists. Some people are seriously sensitive and can go into anaphylactic shock with even a whiff of it. But I'm glad that for whatever reason there are more gluten-free foods out there. It had been something like 20-25 years since I'd eaten a pizza or piece of chocolate cake. Sometimes the little things are more appreciated if they're rare.

Re the labels of gluten free, it isn't always obvious what does or does not have wheat flour in it. Who would think that ALL of Campbell's soups have wheat in them? At least I haven't found one (that I like) that doesn't.

Ketchup? Yup. Seriously, I've seen ketchup with flour in it, I guess as a thickener. A lot of boxed rice does too, including just about all of the Uncle Ben's brand, which I used to eat a lot of. Again, I haven't seen one (that I like) that doesn't. Most of the others do too for at least some of their products so I'm limited there.

McCormick spice packages, such as for beef stew, seemingly all have wheat in them too. I had no idea until I started reading the labels.

There are many other examples.

So, silly as it may seem at times if one doesn't have to deal with the issue, there is good reason for the marketers to slap a big "Gluten Free!" sticker on their box. There's a good chance I will be their customer at least once in a while. And the others, such as McCormick and Uncle Bens, have lost me forever.
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Old 05-19-2015, 05:08 PM   #33
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I also have celiac, and I think that if I were to grouse about all the marketing of low fat foods, or complain about food labels that state ingredients, it would make as much sense as people who do not benefit from gluten-free foods complaining about them being available, or complaining that some people who have not been diagnosed with celiac are buying these foods. Your taxes are not paying for them, so I don't see the problem. Except maybe they make a handy target for folks who are running short on other pet peeves

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Old 05-19-2015, 05:39 PM   #34
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I agree, Ha, and if non celiac affected diners actually feel good laying off gluten then more power to them.

Makes me want to go out and buy a new Ford

@Walt34: some of the boutique pizza joints have perfected a non gluten crust that allows some safe indulgence, maybe give one a try.

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Old 05-19-2015, 06:06 PM   #35
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Improving lives through technology....

The reason that "gluten free" foods were able to come to market in great quantities and record time, was the invention of the electronic gluten strainer.

The previous improvement in nutrition quality, through organic foods took longer, because of the federal regulations:
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The USDA National Organic Program (NOP) defines organic as follows:

Organic food is produced by farmers who emphasize the use of renewable resources and the conservation of soil and water to enhance environmental quality for future generations. Organic meat, poultry, eggs, and dairy products come from animals that are given no antibiotics or growth hormones. Organic food is produced without using most conventional pesticides; fertilizers made with synthetic ingredients or sewage sludge; bioengineering; or ionizing radiation. Before a product can be labeled "organic," a Government-approved certifier inspects the farm where the food is grown to make sure the farmer is following all the rules necessary to meet USDA organic standards. Companies that handle or process organic food before it gets to your local supermarket or restaurant must be certified, too.
It took a little longer to convert farmers in SA countries to comply with the regulations... as in organic bananas.... because of rules like this:

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Converting land to organic status is a three-year process. There is a two-year conversion process consisting of building up the fertility of the land. Produce grown in the first year cannot be stated as organic. In the second year produce may be stated as “In Conversion”. It is not until the third year that produce may be stated as fully organic. Soil and natural fertility building are important parts of organic farming.
The invention of the "calorie magnet" promises to revolutionize the health and fitness programs that currently are the best that current science can promise. Watch for news on this little known advanced technology.
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Old 05-19-2015, 06:52 PM   #36
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@Walt34: some of the boutique pizza joints have perfected a non gluten crust that allows some safe indulgence, maybe give one a try.
Oh, yes, I have!

And Betty Crocker makes a good GF chocolate cake mix. Unfortunately, both have just as many calories as before so I have to minimize intake of both.
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Old 05-19-2015, 09:25 PM   #37
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I've had celiac for about 4 years and am so thankful for the awareness and availability of gluten free options in stores and restaurants now.

I agree that a lot of companies smack on the g-free label for marketing purposes only. Even though it is silly, it still helps spread awareness for those of us who need g-free.
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Old 05-19-2015, 10:04 PM   #38
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Wheat has been part of brewed soy sauce for at roughly 1000 years.

Ha
true, but I wonder if the wheat they used had closer to 14 chromosomes as opposed to the 42 we have now. All those instructions mean more goofy proteins.

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There are people with celiac and gluten intolerances that don't even know it. DW suffered for years with digestive issues before discovering she had celiac. Its not a joke for these folks, but if you don't have any of those afflictions, it probably makes no difference to you. Still much better to eat natural non-processed foods.
Lots of people are getting diagnosed with non-celiac gluten sensitivity now. It manifests in a whole bunch of ways.

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Only a small percentage of people have trouble with gluten. I feel it's just a new $$$$$ fad for people who are not affected.
the small percent reported had a lot to do with a narrow, crummy test that checked for only one thing. Cyrex checks for 24!

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Consumer Reports came out with a rather scathing article criticizing the "gluten-free" food fad. And many of their points were appropriate.

But then they kind of went off the deep end by emphasizing how important it was to get nutrients and fiber from whole wheat grains. As if wheat were essential, and the only source of certain nutrients and fiber. Bunk.

They were also afraid that people would be eating too much rice, and a lot of the US rice supply is high in arsenic. A person can be careful in their rice sources.
I like CU for some stuff, but you're right, when it comes to issues like this, they seem married to the status quo. The message to avoid processed GF stuff is sound, but to sing the praises for wheat? No. If you are looking down the barrel of thousands of nukes from the USSR, lots of storable grain looks like a great idea to solve a macro problem. Eating fresh is a supply chain nightmare, but it is by far the healthiest way to eat.
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Old 05-20-2015, 12:37 AM   #39
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For any of you celiacs who may be visiting Vancouver Island....

Last week I had lunch at The Wild Poppy, a gluten free restaurant and bakery in Ladysmith, BC. I'm not a celiac, but my friend is, to the extent that cross contamination in the kitchen makes her ill. The food was excellent and the bread was light, spongy and delicious.

https://www.facebook.com/pages/Wild-...81703711967723
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Old 05-20-2015, 05:09 AM   #40
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And low-carb, too.

I agree that for most people who aren't trying to manage celiac disease, gluten-free is another trend that's not really going to make them thinner and better-looking. A friend from HS made an interesting observation, though: she doesn't have celiac disease but claims that she feels much better on a gluten-free or low-gluten diet. When she went on a trip to Slovenia, she found that the baked goods there didn't aggravate her system like the ones here. Count me among the Food Conspiracy Theorists if you will, but I wouldn't be surprised if it were due to less processing and simpler ingredients in the food in Slovenia.

Yeah, I have to laugh at the proliferation of "No High-Fructose Corn Syrup!" and "No Trans Fats!" labels from manufacturers who quietly started using those ingredients years ago and are now removing them. It's not that they were doing anything wrong before, mind you, just that customer preferences have changed. Sure.
Some attribute this to the genetic engineering that has gone into US wheat versus the original grain. 42 chromosomes compared to the original 14. Might be something to that!
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