Join Early Retirement Today
Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Good web sites for running & heart rate?
Old 07-11-2010, 12:26 PM   #1
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Posts: 8,625
Good web sites for running & heart rate?

I have found runningforfitness.org as nice web site for helping me figure out where my heart rate should be for training. Do any of you runners have web site suggestions to check out? A google search turns up too many ad-filled fluff sites.

I've taken up running at age 53 as my other sports (basketball, bicycle racing) have just gotten too dangerous for me due to upper body injuries. I am mostly interested in running for less than 1-hour at a time, so not marathons, not half-marathons.

I have found that a heart-rate monitor is an excellent indicator of how strenuous my pace is. So I am interested in web sites, articles, or books that do not de-emphasize this aspect of running. Thanks for any tips!
__________________

__________________
LOL! is offline   Reply With Quote
Join the #1 Early Retirement and Financial Independence Forum Today - It's Totally Free!

Are you planning to be financially independent as early as possible so you can live life on your own terms? Discuss successful investing strategies, asset allocation models, tax strategies and other related topics in our online forum community. Our members range from young folks just starting their journey to financial independence, military retirees and even multimillionaires. No matter where you fit in you'll find that Early-Retirement.org is a great community to join. Best of all it's totally FREE!

You are currently viewing our boards as a guest so you have limited access to our community. Please take the time to register and you will gain a lot of great new features including; the ability to participate in discussions, network with our members, see fewer ads, upload photographs, create a retirement blog, send private messages and so much, much more!

Old 07-11-2010, 01:02 PM   #2
Moderator Emeritus
Rich_by_the_Bay's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: San Francisco
Posts: 8,827
No particular web site to mention at the moment, but that is my preferred workout strategy, too. This is especially important in extreme weather (such as 4 months a year here at least).

I set a target range of 70% to about 90% of max pulse - I like about 85% most of the time. In the fierce heat and humidity, this sometimes means fast walking for several segments of my "run" but that is exactly what protects me from overdoing it. One time before I did that I developed early heat exhaustion back in Tucson - scary because despite my training I didn't recognize it and my running partner noticed that I was staggering a bit and seriously red, I had plenty of water in my hydration bag but just didn't focus on drinking it in. Stopped, found shade, drank like a fish and in the end no harm was done.

But at age 61 and in a hot climate, I got serious about safety and heart rate monitoring is a great way to keep you honest.

You can use the old formula of 220 - Age, though there are more accurate ones around including: =205.8-(0.685 *age), as mentioned here.

Run safe.
__________________

__________________
Rich
San Francisco Area
ESR'd March 2010. FIRE'd January 2011.

As if you didn't know..If the above message contains medical content, it's NOT intended as advice, and may not be accurate, applicable or sufficient. Don't rely on it for any purpose. Consult your own doctor for all medical advice.
Rich_by_the_Bay is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-11-2010, 02:12 PM   #3
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Posts: 8,625
The running for fitness site has all the max-heart-rate formulas in one handy link: Predicted maximum heart rate

Unfortunately, there is conflicting info on whether your max-heart rate should change with age. I have not had a physician-supervised stress test to determine my max heart rate. My annual physical is in September, so maybe at that time I'll get it done.

Not surprisingly, I have found that running is different from cycling. So heart rates I know from cycling are not translating into running for me. My out-of-breath heart rate for cycling is much higher than my out-of-breath heart rate for running. So I can maintain a given high rate for much longer on my bike than I can running. I guess I am just not in running shape or I am not efficient at running.

So a web site on efficient running technique would interest me as well, but I suspect it may have something to do with my lack of running miles.
__________________
LOL! is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-11-2010, 02:19 PM   #4
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
RunningBum's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Posts: 5,193
I like how that web site shows the standard max HR calculators but also (correctly) says they are estimates, and tells you a good way to find your real max HR. I also looked briefly at some of the other info at that site and liked what I saw.

I found that I don't like running with a HR monitor, even though I do believe it is a good way to train. I had a Garmin GPS with a HR monitor but the battery went out on it, and I replaced it with one that doesn't have the monitor because I didn't use it. So I don't have any real advice other that to say you're doing the right thing.

Most of the web sites I use are geared towards marathon and ultra training, but I'll take another look and if I find anything geared towards what you are doing I'll let you know.

Books -- I just picked up 3 to set up a more formal training plan for a fall marathon then the ad hoc plans I had been throwing together.

Pfitzinger "Advanced Marathoning" was the easiest for me to follow, though the focus is very much on marathon training. What I liked is that it explained clearly what each type of run is accomplishing for you, and it's very clear how long and at what pack I should do each run. I'm using it for my training but it's probably not for a non-marathoner.

"Daniels Running Formula" by Jack Daniels is for all distances and looks more geared towards using % of max heart rate for each type of run. I found it tougher to follow than Pfitz and didn't read it too closely. It might be for you, but I'd browse it in a book store before buying it.

Noakes "Lore of Running" is 900+ pages and as you thumb through the contents you realize it is going to be a hard 900 pages to get through. Very intimidating. But I know some serious runners who say that this is the runner's bible.
__________________
RunningBum is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-11-2010, 02:48 PM   #5
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Posts: 8,625
Thanks for the response.

I am reading at CYCLING PERFORMANCE TIPS - :

Quote:
Another key point is maximum heart rates are "sport specific" i.e. they vary from one sport to another. For a given rate of oxygen consumption, weight bearing activities such as running raise the heart rate more than cycling (part of your weight is supported by the bike). So you cannot use your maximum heart rate from running to plan a cycling training program without risking overtraining.
At the same site is a little info about dispensing with a HRM and using Perceived Effort for feedback: CYCLING PERFORMANCE TIPS - I have to say that I can predict my HR easily within better than 5 bpm based on my perceived effort. I was quite surprised by this because I had not been using a HRM until last week.
__________________
LOL! is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-11-2010, 03:06 PM   #6
Full time employment: Posting here.
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 899
I run and bike but don't use a HR monitor.

You might want to look at the Runner's World web site to see if they have anything.

To reinforce what RunningBun said, the books by Noakes and Daniels are both well regarded and should have good info. Daniels is sort of the go to book for serious training advice and Noakes (he's a professor specializing in exercise science) excels at summarizing the academic research.

Another book you might want to look at is Triathlete's Training Bible by Joe Friel. I just thumbed through my copy and noticed a couple of sections where he discussed RPE (Borg Rating of Perceived Exertion) and heart rate for running and cycling.

Sorry, I don't know if any of this is on the web.
__________________
mb is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-11-2010, 03:17 PM   #7
Full time employment: Posting here.
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 899
One more bit of unsolicited advice. Ease into running slowly. Maybe mix in a couple of days of running with a couple of days of cycling each week. It sounds like you're in pretty good shape and you may find that you are quickly able to increase your running mileage. The problem is that bones, tendons and ligaments don't adapt as quickly and that's when injuries start to appear. My experience is that runners are much more prone to repetitive stress injuries than cyclists and b-ball players and a case of something such as plantar fasciitis can take you out of the game for months. Good luck.
__________________
mb is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-11-2010, 03:45 PM   #8
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Posts: 8,625
Thanks for tip to ease into it. Yes, I am doing that. I actually started very slowly back in April by walking 4 miles a day while doing shoulder exercises related to yet another surgery a couple months before on my collarbone (Hi Dex!). I could not ride my bike because it requires two arms and two hands.

Now I am able to run 3 days and ride 3 days a week. I'm not breaking any speed records. I feel good and have no pain from my shoulders down and recover quickly. Even the knee that had ACL reconstruction feels great and the hip that they used for a bone graft feels fine. The HRM has been extremely beneficial in telling me to back-off and slow down.

Anyways, I used to hate running, but now I enjoy it. Some of this comes just because my technique is different by using a higher cadence and shorter stride.
__________________
LOL! is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-11-2010, 05:23 PM   #9
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
RunningBum's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Posts: 5,193
Are you able to run on a groomed trail, like a hike and bike or rails-to-trails path? That's a lot easier on the joints than asphalt. Avoid concrete if at all possible.
__________________
RunningBum is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-11-2010, 05:38 PM   #10
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Posts: 8,625
Unfortunately, I am running on concrete bike paths.
__________________
LOL! is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-11-2010, 05:45 PM   #11
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
RunningBum's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Posts: 5,193
As long as you aren't feeling pain, it'll work, but the first thing you should do if you start having back, knee, hip or foot pain is to find a softer surface.
__________________

__________________
RunningBum is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Recommend a good heart rate monitor? Nords Health and Early Retirement 14 10-16-2009 10:52 AM
Web sites to track election? David1961 Other topics 13 09-05-2008 12:01 PM
Looking for good web sites to track funds David1961 FIRE and Money 1 01-04-2008 05:20 PM
Web sites for the RVing Lifestyle audreyh1 Life after FIRE 5 01-30-2007 12:29 PM
Question about Corporate Web-Sites cube_rat Other topics 3 10-13-2005 06:31 PM

 

 
All times are GMT -6. The time now is 03:24 AM.
 
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.