Join Early Retirement Today
Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 10-24-2011, 03:05 PM   #21
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
braumeister's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Northern Kentucky
Posts: 8,610
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dimsumkid View Post
I had something similar happen with my doctor 2-3 years ago, I normally get good BP readings, then when I saw my doctor, the readings were always spiking. My doctor almost put me on BP meds when she finally decided to take one last reading, and much to her surprise, it came out normal and no Rx meds were given to me. Turns out it's something called "white coat syndrome" where your BP spikes in a medical setting, so the trick was to wait until the end of the doctor's visit before a BP reading was taken.
Absolutely right.
Once my doctor and I realized this, the problem went away. He takes the BP, it's always somewhat high, we both ignore it. We chat about other things for five minutes or so, he takes another reading, and it's always perfectly normal, just as it is when I take my own reading at home.
__________________

__________________
Pas de lieu Rhône que nous.
braumeister is offline   Reply With Quote
Join the #1 Early Retirement and Financial Independence Forum Today - It's Totally Free!

Are you planning to be financially independent as early as possible so you can live life on your own terms? Discuss successful investing strategies, asset allocation models, tax strategies and other related topics in our online forum community. Our members range from young folks just starting their journey to financial independence, military retirees and even multimillionaires. No matter where you fit in you'll find that Early-Retirement.org is a great community to join. Best of all it's totally FREE!

You are currently viewing our boards as a guest so you have limited access to our community. Please take the time to register and you will gain a lot of great new features including; the ability to participate in discussions, network with our members, see fewer ads, upload photographs, create a retirement blog, send private messages and so much, much more!

Old 10-24-2011, 03:19 PM   #22
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Posts: 7,530
Quote:
Originally Posted by John Galt III View Post
Fuego, I was able to get a blood test done, for thyroid, for cash, for just $35, 3 years ago. No insurance, just cash. I had to shop around. Most labs wanted $200 or so for the same bloodtest. I didn't ask any questions about why it was only $35, of course. But the impression I got was that they were still making a profit, at $35, just not an obscene profit to cover the non-payers.
That's probably the one my insurance company pays $10 for. I have seen a service that allows you to "buy" a coupon for a lab test of your choosing and then redeem it at any local lab that participates (and all the big ones did participate). Rates reasonable like what you are quoting (ie $35 for a $200 rack rate test).

I'm just flustered from a recent (failed) attempt at getting a price quote. The insurance company can't tell me what they will pay on a specific procedure (even when I have the CPT code) because they claim many variables are involved. And the provider can't tell me anything other than the rack rate for the procedure (which is probably 5-10x the actual negotiated rate the ins co will be paying, hence the providers' price data is meaningless). At the end of the day, I gave up caring because we only pay 20% of the cost with no deductible with DW's insurance, and I figured at the most the procedure would cost $20-30 additional, so given the burdens of price discovery, why bother finding out what the cost would be. This is strictly an optional procedure covered by insurance, and I think the total cost to us will be no more than $30, but I could be wrong. Just sad that I can't find out how much it would cost to see whether it is worth it to us.
__________________

__________________
Retired in 2013 at age 33. Keeping busy reading, blogging, relaxing, gaming, and enjoying the outdoors with my wife and 3 kids (5, 11, and 12).
FUEGO is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-24-2011, 03:28 PM   #23
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Kerrville,Tx
Posts: 2,718
Quote:
Originally Posted by nun View Post
Health care cost increases seem very similar to the housing bubble. Many simply cannot contemplate paying such enormous amounts for health care. I certainly don't intend to pay for lifestyle drugs in retirement.

I'm 50 and my ex-doctor just tried to put me on hyper tension meds because of what I knew to be a couple of unnaturally high in office BP measurements. I had the knowledge to avoid getting on chronic medication, but I wonder how often it happens and how it inflates costs?

retirement-health-care-costs-marketwatch: Personal Finance News from Yahoo! Finance
A home blood pressure monitoring device costs about $60. I go to the doctor with a list of about 20-30 readings, and that helps a lot. We checked the first time and the readings of the doctors equipment and the cuff were within a couple of points of each other. BTW note that insist that if a drug were to be prescribed that the doctor start with one on the $10/3 month list at various pharmacies. (Its cheaper than the co-pay if paid thru the mail order pharmacy).

Also starting with the generic medications means there is less likleyhood of unexpected events because there has been a period of large population testing of the drug to see if unexpected events happen.
__________________
meierlde is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-24-2011, 03:34 PM   #24
Recycles dryer sheets
Blackwoodt's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: Kearney
Posts: 121
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dimsumkid View Post
I had something similar happen with my doctor 2-3 years ago, I normally get good BP readings, then when I saw my doctor, the readings were always spiking. My doctor almost put me on BP meds when she finally decided to take one last reading, and much to her surprise, it came out normal and no Rx meds were given to me. Turns out it's something called "white coat syndrome" where your BP spikes in a medical setting, so the trick was to wait until the end of the doctor's visit before a BP reading was taken.
My blood pressure has to be taken manually, for some reason the automatic cuffs give off extremely high readings on me, when I have normal BP. From what I’ve been told, the automatic readings are often unreliable, and you should always have your blood pressure taken manually.
__________________
Not all who wander are lost - J. R. Tolkien
Blackwoodt is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-24-2011, 03:35 PM   #25
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
John Galt III's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Posts: 1,285
I think health insurance has become like Wall Street derivatives : overly complex, on purpose, in an attempt to cover up the flimflam. Having made that negative statement, let me add that I am happy with my current health ins policy, from work, which has low premiums, and good coverage. But if I were to get coverage on my own , I would probably have to pay huge premiums.
__________________
John Galt III is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-24-2011, 08:58 PM   #26
Dryer sheet aficionado
Ksols's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Blue Springs
Posts: 47
These posts make me feel real blessed to have the doctor I do. I was prescribed blood pressure and cholesterol prescriptions several years ago. I have been taking them but also have changed diet and upped my exercise. After a few visits he is asking me to cut my BP medicine into 1/4's with eliminating it totally when I retire. The cholesterol readings are hovering around 200 but he told me he doesn't want to increase the dosage for fear of increase of toxicity in the body versus the "good" it could do.
__________________
Ksols is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-24-2011, 09:56 PM   #27
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Largo
Posts: 1,945
Quote:
Originally Posted by nun View Post
That's how I felt with housing. It kept going up for far longer than I expected. Anything that increases by 3, 4 or 5 times inflation every year is unsustainable
So does that mean the college tuition bubble is about to burst? Seems they've been running at 5-6% compounded annual increase for the last 30 years.
__________________
Buckeye is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-25-2011, 09:23 AM   #28
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
travelover's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Posts: 9,896
Quote:
Originally Posted by Buckeye View Post
So does that mean the college tuition bubble is about to burst? Seems they've been running at 5-6% compounded annual increase for the last 30 years.
As Buffett says, trees don't grow to the sky. There is a limit for everything.
__________________
Yes, I have achieved work / life balance.
travelover is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-25-2011, 09:26 AM   #29
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
Ed_The_Gypsy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: the City of Subdued Excitement
Posts: 5,293
Quote:
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ed_The_Gypsy
As an investor, I am betting against you. I have VGHCX.

Remember, the market can stay irrational longer than you can stay solvent.

Not sympatico, just ruthless.


That may well be a good bet, but the longer the bet is good the farther it will have to fall so get out before the bubble bursts.
I will be happy to be wrong, by the way.
__________________
my bumpersticker:
"I am not in a hurry.
I am retired.
And I don't care how big your truck is."
Ed_The_Gypsy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-25-2011, 11:27 AM   #30
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
Brat's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: Portland, Oregon
Posts: 5,914
I am a retired Fed and sign up for one of the health insurance programs offered. The Fed pays part of the health insurance premium. I also have Medicare A & B. The Fed health insurance provides drug coverage with co-pays, and because I have Medicare B, all other co-pays. What I am paying for the health insurance programs is MUCH more than what I would be paying for Kaiser Perm. Medicare Advantage program for the same benefits.

That is nuts. I wish OPM would offer Medicare advantage programs without the Fed contribution and save us all $$. The only reason why I don't drop out of the Fed health insurance program is that I can't get back in should Medicare advantage insurance evaporate.
__________________
Duck bjorn.
Brat is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-25-2011, 02:13 PM   #31
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
grasshopper's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Posts: 1,670
I am in 118/74, drinking my after nap coffee, having a piece of pumpkin pie, and watching the market down over 1% today.
__________________
grasshopper is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-25-2011, 02:58 PM   #32
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
nun's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Posts: 4,836
Quote:
Originally Posted by Buckeye

So does that mean the college tuition bubble is about to burst? Seems they've been running at 5-6% compounded annual increase for the last 30 years.
Tuition debt is over a trillion dollars and more than credit card debt. Kids will increasingly go to cheaper colleges and those with the debt will drop healthcare so they can pay off those loans as you can't get rid of them through bankruptcy
__________________
“So we beat on, boats against the current, borne back ceaselessly into the past.”

Current AA: 65% Equity Funds / 20% Bonds / 7% Stable Value /3% Cash / 5% TIAA Traditional
Retired Mar 2014 at age 52, target WR: 0.0%,
Income from pension and rent
nun is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-25-2011, 06:44 PM   #33
Full time employment: Posting here.
 
Join Date: May 2011
Location: Marco island
Posts: 813
Quote:
Originally Posted by GregLee
But aren't bubbles connected with borrowing? People don't generally borrow to finance their healthcare, or even pay as they go. They prepay.
Uncle Sam is the number one healthcare consumer via Medicare, Medicaid, Military, etc. and they have borrowed trillions and trillions and trillions.
__________________
Gatordoc50 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-26-2011, 08:07 AM   #34
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
teejayevans's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Posts: 1,222
The problem is, you don't need a house but you do need health care (unless you willing to make the ultimate sacrifice).
TJ
__________________

__________________
teejayevans is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Who really robbed the middle class? Health Care clifp FIRE Related Public Policy 68 12-05-2011 02:40 PM
US Pulls plug on Long Term Care portion of health care reformct ("CLASS Act") samclem Other topics 14 10-15-2011 11:27 AM
Debt/Deficit/Taxes and Health Care Reform chinaco FIRE Related Public Policy 13 08-31-2011 05:21 AM
How to Invest my Mom's Money for Her Home Health Care Aide Costs? nico08 FIRE and Money 9 07-15-2011 03:51 PM

 

 
All times are GMT -6. The time now is 03:10 AM.
 
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.