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High Tibial Osteotomy, open wedge?
Old 07-31-2015, 04:03 PM   #1
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High Tibial Osteotomy, open wedge?

Wondering if anyone has had this procedure on their knee. I have bad chondromalacia (arthritis) on my right knee. My surgeon says I'm a good candidate for this procedure the HTO. They cut a wedge of bone out and then graft some hip bone inside the wedge to change the orientation of the weight bearing on the knee from the inside to the outside. It has the advantage of giving complete use of the knee once healed and a return to unrestricted physical activity. I have been reading up on it and it scares the hell out of me. Some of the stories are quite explicit about pain after surgery. It's about two months recovery with total non bearing weight restrictions on crutches. It is a somewhat older procedure losing ground to total knee replacement but has favor in younger 40-60 non overweight patients wanting to regain former activity levels is what my surgeon claims. He states I'm the perfect candidate but I'm a little hesitant because of the long recovery regime. I'm hoping not all experiences are as dismal as the ones I have been reading.
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Old 07-31-2015, 04:57 PM   #2
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Have zero knowledge on this...

But why would this be better than a knee replacement?

My old boss did a knee replacement and was back at work in a few weeks... he is a bit strange in some ways, but I was surprised on how quick he was able to get back to doing almost anything....
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Old 07-31-2015, 07:46 PM   #3
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They're also doing some partial knee replacements as a better option to full knee replacement. This procedure seems like it may be that kind of surgery.

The whole deal is that they don't like to do full joint replacements on younger people because they don't like re-doing a 20 year old full knee replacement because it wore out on someone that's now 85 years old. They try not to do full joint replacements on younger patients for that reason.
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Old 07-31-2015, 09:00 PM   #4
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Texas Proud , I'm glad you brought it up because the Doctor just called me and guess what I asked him. This procedure has no restrictions and once healed you could literally jog on it or play high impact sports. The TKR has limitations and my running days would be over.

Bamamam, Seems the TKR is easier post-op. I'm 56 and a former cancer patient . Long life expectancy is probably not in my cards. That being said 20 years would probably be enough for me.

I think if I can give up running and jumping the TKR is probably the right choice for me, but now I'm questioning if either one is right for me. Does this come down to level of activity desired? I just walked to the nearby park with my DW and was in mild pain every step. I assume my condition will worsen if I do nothing? Aging has it's dilemmas.
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Old 07-31-2015, 11:14 PM   #5
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I have not had that surgery. About 20 years ago, I did have a tibial tubercle transfer osteotomy. It worked great for most of those years although I did still have the existing damage to to the cartilage in my patella. So, I don't do anything high impact now.
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Old 07-31-2015, 11:56 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ratface View Post
Texas Proud , I'm glad you brought it up because the Doctor just called me and guess what I asked him. This procedure has no restrictions and once healed you could literally jog on it or play high impact sports. The TKR has limitations and my running days would be over.

Bamamam, Seems the TKR is easier post-op. I'm 56 and a former cancer patient . Long life expectancy is probably not in my cards. That being said 20 years would probably be enough for me.

I think if I can give up running and jumping the TKR is probably the right choice for me, but now I'm questioning if either one is right for me. Does this come down to level of activity desired? I just walked to the nearby park with my DW and was in mild pain every step. I assume my condition will worsen if I do nothing? Aging has it's dilemmas.

If the doc says that you can go and do the high impact sports and you could not with a TKR.... then go for it... however, I thought you could with the TKR....

Now, I have seen my old boss move his new knee around in strange positions and it makes some strange noises.... so I guess there is some limitations to its use...
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