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Old 04-30-2014, 10:54 PM   #41
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I quit after 14 years of a pack a day Camels. Just did it cold turkey @ 29 years old. Then started a long distance running campaign that lasted 15 years (wore out a hip).

DW smoked most of her life and now has COPD. Not good only having lungs that work @48% efficiency and getting worse.

Now we spend more on meds and doctors annually than she spent on butts but a factor of 1000.
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How did you quit smoking?
Old 05-01-2014, 12:12 AM   #42
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How did you quit smoking?

I have never smoked but as a physician I counseled many smokers to quit. My advice to them was often met with a statement like, "no one ever explained it to me like that before!" Or " I never thought about like that before!" So here is what I would say which incorporates much of what others have said in this thread:

1)many millions of people have quit smoking. They are no smarter or better than anyone else. Quitting is difficult BUT this can be done. You can do this.

2) Quitting smoking successfully involves two phases:
A) quitting for the next several weeks to months and beyond- with this part I always asked them, "when you leave here, when would you normally next light up? What if you just didn't do it? What would you feel that would push you to light up? Anxious? Craving? I realize lighting up relieves that feeling, but whatever it is, how long do you think that feeling will last if you do not light up?" I remind them that they probably have done this already- on airplanes, in my waiting room, at church, etc...someplace where they wanted a cig but could not have one. and probably they did not realize this is the same thing as quitting. I note that the intense need for a cig likely fades in less than 15 minutes...
For the next 15 minutes, do anything else..sex, shower, go for a walk, do the dishes, go someplace smoking is not allowed- something where it could be challenging to smoke... If you just concentrate on doing whatever to avoid having THIS cigarette AND ONLY THIS CIGARETTE, it is simpler. When you break it down into a nice short bite sized chunk it should be easier. What they are likely to find is that each time they skip a cigarette the intensity of the craving and the length of time to get over it gets less. Quitting smoking in this phase is not about quitting for the rest of your life. It is about quitting for the next 15 minutes. And soon they may not have cravings at all. But the battle is not over.

B) staying an ex -smoker means being aware that at any time -even years since you have had a craving - you may find yourself wanting to have "Just One." This may be precipitated by stress, or by seeing someone else enjoying a cig, or by finding yourself in an old familiar smoking setting for you...You must never never never ever give in to this desire to try just one. The cigarettes will whisper lies to you about how it is just one time, etc...it is a dangerous game to play and successfully quitting means not playing that game-ever. Remember as before - do not have THAT cigarette just for the next 15 minutes.
Being aware that you may be "ambushed" by cravings automatically makes you better prepared to deal with those feelings so you can continue to be a successful ex-smoker.
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Old 05-01-2014, 08:53 AM   #43
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Old 05-01-2014, 09:07 AM   #44
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Stopped smoking 9 years ago after a 30 year habit and several failed attempts to stop. A friend of DW's recommended reading this book to quit: Allen Carr's Easy Way to Stop Smoking: The Easyway To Stop Smoking: Allen Carr: 9780615482156: Amazon.com: Books

Dw and I both read it and quit right afterwards. We know at least 20 others who have read the book and quit. Good luck!
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Old 05-01-2014, 09:12 AM   #45
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I'm not a smoker but I have heard several people say that by using cigars they were able to phase out cigarettes, and that the cigars were much easier to give up afterward.


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Old 05-01-2014, 09:16 AM   #46
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I'm a stubborn SOB and one day 12 years ago decided to use it to my advantage. Every one is different as to the balance between mental addiction and physical addiction. For me it was almost all mental ... nicotine gum didn't help at all. For my buddy it was almost all physical. I found an online support group a very valuable tool ... there was always someone who could identify with exactly what I was going through. Get mad, get stubborn, get quit. Best of Luck!
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Old 05-01-2014, 09:45 AM   #47
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Quit cold turkey March 18, 1985 at 1:18 PM Central Time. Not that I'm counting.

I think my key to success was telling myself that if I ever touched another cigarette I'd be instantly hooked again, like an alcoholic (never having known an alcoholic, I guess I really don't know that). I gnawed coffee stirrers and ate sunflower seeds in the shell, which kept my mouth and hands busy. There was a hump at about 3 months, but I got over it. Eventually, the thought of cigarette smoke got so disgusting there was no further danger of backsliding.

Good luck. The morning phlegm stopped after only a few days, which I took as my body's signal that this is definitely the right thing to do.
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Old 05-01-2014, 10:09 AM   #48
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It was odd for me, my fear of future pain caused me to quit. I never had the post quitting cravings that many go through.

I started, after a few months, to notice the smell of smoke, and how nasty it was. When my FIL quit he said he could smell smokers in the car ahead of him with his windows up. DW and I thought he was going through cravings(he had a lot), then it happened to us. It's true how different the world smells after you quit.
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Old 05-01-2014, 10:17 AM   #49
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This may be a strong positive incentive: I just Googled the price of a pack of cigarettes. YIKES! Here in New Jersey they're about $9/pack. M'gosh, a pack a day means $3285/year !
That goes a long way to anyone's retirement budget. Instead of buying a pack of cigarettes, take $9 out of your wallet and put it in a piggy bank, and once a week(or daily if you're so inclined) deposit the money in the bank.
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Old 05-01-2014, 11:47 AM   #50
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The morning phlegm stopped after only a few days, which I took as my body's signal that this is definitely the right thing to do.
+1

That was probably the single most noticeable improvement for me.
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Old 05-02-2014, 06:16 AM   #51
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I smoked for 5 years when I was young. I handed over the last pack to my mom before I boarded the airplane to US and I never smoked again. That was 31 years ago. The life changing event helped me stop.
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Old 05-02-2014, 10:20 AM   #52
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Changed to e-cigs 2 years ago. I barely miss the real ones. Not wanting to disappoint my wife and son has helped me quit. Some of my friends smoke, but I don't care. Cancer and emphysema help me stay quit too.....
BTW.... All this current threat to e-cigs....might it not be counterproducive to persecute the lesser of two evils?
I'd appreciate your opinions on this issue. Thank you.
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Old 05-02-2014, 10:32 AM   #53
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I quit cold turkey the day my first grand child was born 10 years ago. I couldn't fathom exhaling that old ashtray breath on that spankin' new baby. Before that I had smoked for 30+ years.
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Old 05-02-2014, 10:55 AM   #54
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Changed to e-cigs 2 years ago. I barely miss the real ones. Not wanting to disappoint my wife and son has helped me quit. Some of my friends smoke, but I don't care. Cancer and emphysema help me stay quit too.....

BTW.... All this current threat to e-cigs....might it not be counterproducive to persecute the lesser of two evils?

I'd appreciate your opinions on this issue. Thank you.

Since nicotine in and of itself does not cause cancer or emphysema, one would think e-cig would be the better choice of the two. I do think some regulation of them would be good as far as under 18 restriction, as they are just a step away from actual smoking. If I were one who used them, I would want regulation and testing of the chemicals used in the process. Many come from China and God only knows what chemicals are dumped into those cartridges. I partake of nicotine mints only myself, and I don't lose any sleep over the use of them. However, I wouldn't ever use an e- cig. Just out of the necessity to avoid confusion and chaos in public areas it would seem best to restrict them like a cigarette. Hmm, after re-reading my post I should delete. I view myself as moderately libertarian. This post makes me look like a hypocrite!


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Old 05-02-2014, 11:47 AM   #55
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as for regulation, I see no problem, other than the (assumed) eventual price increase; still cheaper than cigs overall. I might spend $20/month on ejuice, prolly that much every other month for coils (the heating element - needs to be replaced every week or so)

as far as using it in public, I still go outside or to smoking area to use it. I'm not one of those types who want to create hoopla and argue over "it's not a cigarette". I view those folks as attention whores
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Old 05-02-2014, 12:04 PM   #56
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BTW.... All this current threat to e-cigs....might it not be counterproducive to persecute the lesser of two evils?
As long as they don't market to children. There lies the problem.
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Old 05-02-2014, 07:34 PM   #57
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The cartridges my mom buys from Blu have the ingredients listed right on the box. Not so on a pack of cigarettes even though they are heavily regulated.
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Old 05-09-2014, 03:49 PM   #58
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Quote:
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BTW.... All this current threat to e-cigs....might it not be counterproducive to persecute the lesser of two evils?
I'd appreciate your opinions on this issue. Thank you.
Second-hand addictive and/or harmful smoke is the primary issue for me. I craved nicotine long before I lit my first cigarette. My libertarian streak says you should be free to indulge your addictions. However, that freedom does not include making me inhale your smoke. If an e-cig might be emitting an addictive or harmful substance, using it "in public" should be banned.

Requiring e-cigs to list their ingredients seems likely to promote e-cig usage to me. Buying secret proprietary addictive substances is a sucker's bet.

The only other "current threat" to e-cigs I'm aware of concerns selling addictive substances to minors. I recall reading that most cigarette smokers started young, which is why tobacco companies used to give out sample packs to young people. I suspect the same dynamic applies to e-cigs.
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Old 05-09-2014, 08:37 PM   #59
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I started smoking in my teens. Smoked for 35+ years.

In May, 2012 my father handed me $10,000.00. He said, "This is to help you quit. If you smoke after July 4, 2012, give me the money back. Keep the money as long as you don't smoke." He enlisted my wife's assistance to keep me honest. I figured I might cheat if I waited until the last minute, so I quit cold turkey June 3, 2012.

I still have the cash.

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Old 05-10-2014, 12:03 AM   #60
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Congratulations on stopping smoking.

It was the hardest thing I've done. I set a date about a couple of weeks in the future and then quit on that date. And then after a little time, I'd start again. This went on for almost 2 years! I didn't smoke in my home even though I lived alone. I just kept trying and the length of time I was successful kept growing.

When I moved in with my GF (now DW) in June of 1995, I smoked my last cigarette.

If you relapse - take a deep breath, set a date a week ahead and try again. And remember that those dollars you're spending are lining some fat cat's pocket and he's laughing all the way to the bank at your expense - health & money.
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