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Old 05-10-2014, 12:44 PM   #61
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I started around age 15. Quit in my 20s for 7 years and then quit again 10 years ago. Would you believe I just picked up the habit again a month ago?
Haven't made a plan to quit again, but I could kick myself for starting it back up after so long...
Oh no! Was it because of you having to go back to work after that exciting trip through Siberia? If so, I hope you get to ER soon. I used to smoke when I was stressed out by work. When I stopped giving a damn, I was able to quit for real.
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Old 05-11-2014, 08:36 AM   #62
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I quit three times. Each time I began again with a stronger cigarette. First quit in 1970, finally in 1977. No patches, just will power.
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Old 05-11-2014, 02:21 PM   #63
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I have never smoked but as a physician I counseled many smokers to quit... I note that the intense need for a cig likely fades in less than 15 minutes....

For the next 15 minutes, do anything else..sex, shower, go for a walk...
Yeah, but that still leaves me with 6-7 minutes to kill.
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Old 05-12-2014, 09:50 AM   #64
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Yeah, but that still leaves me with 6-7 minutes to kill.
"You go back, Jack, do it again." -- Steely Dan

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Old 05-12-2014, 11:09 AM   #65
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Congratulations on stopping smoking.

It was the hardest thing I've done.

And remember that those dollars you're spending are lining some fat cat's pocket and he's laughing all the way to the bank at your expense - health & money.
This

On Mother's day, twenty two years ago or something like that. I imagined some fat cat who was my master, because of my addiction.

There was a movie out that I found hilarious. "Thank You For Smoking" if I remember right.
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Old 05-15-2014, 11:38 PM   #66
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Quit after 10 years, 30+ years ago. Everytime I quit whether 1 day of 2 weeks, the restart always made me nauseous. And if I had a high sugar soft drink (cola especially bad) I would get light headed, nauseous, heart racing, and blood pressure drop. By the 4th smoke, I'd be Ok. I quit when I convince my self that I really didn't like the affect of the first smoke and the second smoke would me worse than the first. I get physically ill just thinking about it. So I never think about smoking and any smoke around me is now a positively revolting event.
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Old 05-23-2014, 05:55 AM   #67
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Well, the good news is that my 73 year old mother finally quit smoking this week. The bad news is that it took the removal of part of her lung to make that happen. We don't know yet if the surgery got all of the cancer or whether more is necessary or possible.

If you are a smoker, please do yourself a favor and quit.
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Old 05-23-2014, 07:04 AM   #68
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Best wishes for a full recovery.
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Old 05-23-2014, 07:55 AM   #69
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I saw several news articles earlier this week about the results of a new study that provides more evidence that e-cigarettes help smokers quit. Maybe this is a good route to go if you are still struggling to quit.

Evidence builds that e-cigarettes help smokers quit - Health & wellness - The Boston Globe
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Old 05-23-2014, 10:03 AM   #70
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I smoked for 19 years and was up to a carton a week when I quit. Here's how I did it:

First, my sister had finally managed to quit after several attempts and she gave me some advice (use the patch) and also some motivation; if my sister can do it...

I was turning 40 and had never tried to quit before, but prices for cigs were going up and I felt that it was time to quit.

I used the patch. Had to pay for them myself, although now I think most health plans will cover it. I had some really funky dreams while using the highest strength patch so I feel like they were giving much more nicotine than I was getting from my ultralight smokes. Can't really say whether or not they helped, but I did quit for good.

I told everyone and used them as my support network. Tried to keep busy and to avoid high trigger activities, but of course you can't do that forever.

I rewarded myself. Had a modest car payment at the time so told myself that I could roll my monthly cigarette spending into a nicer car payment if I stayed clean for 6 months. I would car shop for motivation. Bought an Audi A6 and drove it for 8 years. Great car.

I didn't gain any weight and I did not feel one bit better once I quit. I still consider myself to be an addict. Traveling today is so much easier if you don't smoke. Good luck. Reward yourself!
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Old 05-23-2014, 10:14 AM   #71
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Well, the good news is that my 73 year old mother finally quit smoking this week. The bad news is that it took the removal of part of her lung to make that happen. We don't know yet if the surgery got all of the cancer or whether more is necessary or possible.

If you are a smoker, please do yourself a favor and quit.
Oh, no. I hope she has many smokefree years ahead of her.
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Old 05-26-2014, 07:37 AM   #72
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Three days ago I tossed out the ashtray and the lighters and quit cold turkey. ...
update... 4.1 weeks now without a ciggy! I like to chart progress towards goals (vestigial from megacorp life I suppose). Found this & copied to a spreadsheet. As incremental time posts are reached, they get checked off. Makes me feel like I've achieved something but that there's a lot more to get. Stop Smoking Benefits Timetable
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Old 05-26-2014, 08:24 AM   #73
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update... 4.1 weeks now without a ciggy! I like to chart progress towards goals (vestigial from megacorp life I suppose). Found this & copied to a spreadsheet. As incremental time posts are reached, they get checked off. Makes me feel like I've achieved something but that there's a lot more to get. Stop Smoking Benefits Timetable
Good job. Now stay the course...
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Old 05-26-2014, 09:39 AM   #74
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update... 4.1 weeks now without a ciggy!
Congratulations! You may have already passed the serious temptation point, so you're probably home free.

If you're not a regular aerobic exerciser, now is the best time to start, so you can get your lung power back. I used to think of it as power-flushing my lungs. Difficult at first, but it keeps getting easier.
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Old 05-26-2014, 11:54 AM   #75
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Congratulations! You may have already passed the serious temptation point, so you're probably home free.

If you're not a regular aerobic exerciser, now is the best time to start, so you can get your lung power back. I used to think of it as power-flushing my lungs. Difficult at first, but it keeps getting easier.
I agree, at this point you're typically past the physical withdraw symptoms. Now comes the difficult part, the demons that tell you it's ok to have one. Don't give in, if you slip, start again.

Have you gotten to the point where you can smell smoke on others? That was a big motivation for me.

Congratulations, it's really hard to quit. I know you can do it.
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Old 05-27-2014, 03:25 AM   #76
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I'm not a smoker but I have heard several people say that by using cigars they were able to phase out cigarettes, and that the cigars were much easier to give up afterward.


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I quit cigarettes in 2002, after taking my newly adopted 13 month old daughter for a walk, and realizing she was looking up at me. However, I still smoked the "occasional" cigar, especially when I played golf. Over the years, the "occasional" built up to 2-4 cigars per day, even when I didn't play golf. I stunk. Checked into the hospital two weeks ago with severe pain from a kidney stone. Spent five days on painkillers in a hospital bed before passing the stone a few hours before scheduled surgery, and haven't had a cigar now in 9 more days since I've been home from the hospital.
Maybe cigars are easier than cigs to quit, but it's still a big temptation to go light one up. My fear is, that I'll be back to as often as I can if I do.
Thanks for posting this timely, for me, topic.
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Old 05-29-2014, 12:15 PM   #77
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I smoked my last cig December 7th last year....was not planning on quitting at all. I got really sick and for a week it was just awful...all the coughing, fever, and burning in my chest. I remember lying in bed thinking that if I did not stop, my DH would have to take care of me as I died of emphysema, lung cancer, or something else. He watched his father die of emphysema and I cannot do that to him. Plus what was the point of saving this money if I was going to die before him So it's been 5 months and change now and I still have cravings and I still feel like going and buying a pack...but it is ok and the craving will pass. I second the exercising part...it does help a lot and I feel so much stronger and healthier now
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Old 06-05-2014, 07:31 PM   #78
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Mega corp bought a membership to QuitNet and charged an extra $50 a month for health insurance if you smoked and didn't join. They also supplied patches, lozenges or gum. I chose the gum option. 19 months later I still get monthly congratulations from QuitNet.
Most important for me is to remember how easy relapse can be. Last quit was 6 months and one cigarette let to a pack a day in less than a week. The time before that was 4 years quit and a cigar at a bachelor party ended that run.
This time its forever, at least today.

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