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Old 09-09-2013, 10:23 PM   #41
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The literature I've been reading seems to suggest that there are 3 main emotional states that are damaging to cardiac health:

1. A sense of time pressure, always hurrying, being in a rush.
2. Free floating hostility, especially when combined with cynicism.
3. Strong emotional reactivity when things go wrong or you get criticized.
I had not seen those before, but they ring true for me. I had a heart attack at age 51, and I had #1 &2 and was working on #3. Since then, in following the Cardio Rehab advice to listen to my body more, I (apparently) intuitively stopped all of those behaviors. For instance, for #1, after the heart attack, my body was clearly rejecting any effort to zoom zoom zoom. It was telling me 'just stop this'. Same with the other items.
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Old 09-09-2013, 11:12 PM   #42
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Originally Posted by ER Eddie View Post
The literature I've been reading seems to suggest that there are 3 main emotional states that are damaging to cardiac health:

1. A sense of time pressure, always hurrying, being in a rush.
2. Free floating hostility, especially when combined with cynicism.
3. Strong emotional reactivity when things go wrong or you get criticized.
In my second to last job I had #s 1 (insane workload and responsibility) and to some extent, #3 (which has more to do with one's need to be perceived positively than anything else). But I was respected, appreciated and listened to. I felt that the organization was willing to come along with me. We achieved a great deal, but the job was taking a toll on me.

I moved to my last job to address #1 (and to facilitate a move to my desired ER location). Unfortunately, I ran into a sh*tload of #2. Hence, my tenure in my last job was shorter than planned.

It's all good now.
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Old 09-09-2013, 11:27 PM   #43
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Here's what I did to cope with the stress:

1) I started working harder and harder on my retirement planning.

2) I had a specific retirement date (the first day I was eligible for pension and retiree health care), and began the count-down at around 2650 working days to go, IIRC.

3) I wrote every date in columns on lined paper. Every morning when I arrived at work, the first thing I did was cross off that date. I kept the sheets with crossed off dates to show me how fast I was plowing through them. Also I changed the number of working days left on my white board (from 2650 to 2649, then 2648, etc).

4) Every morning after that I checked my financial accounts and compared with projections.

5) I channeled all my angst into increasing my LBYM severely, and at the same time made a game of it. I was really surprised at how little I truly needed to live on, when the reward for saving more could mean a shorter time working there or more to spend after retirement.

6) I just kept a stiff upper lip, got tough, put my head down and went for it like a tank invading the enemy country at war. Look out right, look out left, here I come.

Overall, this approach left me with a great deal more stress to shed after retirement than I had anticipated. It probably would have killed me if I had had to work there another 10 years, but guess what? I didn't..
That's a pretty hard-charging approach to reducing stress.

Hopefully now you are more like the cat in your avatar.
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Old 09-09-2013, 11:33 PM   #44
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That's a pretty hard-charging approach to reducing stress.

Hopefully now you are more like the cat in your avatar.
Yep! I am just like that cat, now! I even take naps a lot. Since I retired (in 2009) Job #1 has been stress reduction. Retirement has really helped.
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