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Old 06-05-2008, 05:14 PM   #21
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he sees the beginning of cataracts! And he attributes the problems I have driving at night and dealing with glare to this...
Been there - done that. Wait till it gets so bad that it looks like every car has their high beams on (they don't!)

At least cataract surgery has come a long way - it's actually no big deal.

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Old 06-05-2008, 08:30 PM   #22
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I started wearing glasses at age 11 for nearsightedness in my right eye. The left one was 20/20 until about 40. The right one is now 20/200 but correctable to 20/15. Been wearing contacts since my early 30's, and I'm afraid of Lasik surgery because a couple of people at work had that done and had problems with it. One almost lost his job because of the difficulty driving at night. So if/when the time comes I can't wear contacts I'll go back to glasses. And I use 2.00 OTC reading glasses when I'm wearing the contacts.
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Old 06-05-2008, 09:37 PM   #23
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I was very afraid that Lasik would make my night vision worse...as my pupils are very large to begin with, I had problems driving at night wearing contacts as I would see around the edge of the lens.

Before my Lasik surgery I talked with the surgeon -- a doc who was among the first to do Lasik in North America -- and explained my concern. He told me that he planned to make my corneal flap larger than normal and do the surgery on a slightly larger field than is typical. I've had absolutely no night vision problems, no glare or "high beam" vision, no dry eyes-- night vision is as perfect (20/15) as is daytime sight.
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Old 06-08-2008, 10:23 AM   #24
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I think your baseline vision is the criteria for evaluating subsequent "solutions".

Spouse has had crappy vision her entire life and she's thrilled with gas-permeable multifocal contacts. They kept adding more until they went too far (tough time seeing at a distance), backed off one add, and she's happy again.

In my case I can remember what my vision used to look like. When you can no longer pick out the details of that bikini longboard a hundred yards away because your plastic wrap on your eyeball multifocal contacts sacrificed your distance clarity for close vision, you realize you've made a compromise. I don't particularly enjoy the compromise and I'm pretty whiny grumpy about it, but now I appreciate what people are dealing with.

I can see that monovision or cataract surgery are going to be my next decade's alternatives. Until then, dealing with soft lenses is better than switching reading glasses. And if it's any consolation to new contact wearers, it gets better with a few months' practice.
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Old 06-08-2008, 04:24 PM   #25
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My glasses prescription gets me back to seeing just fine. I wear Definity II progressive lenses.

But I have more floaters than before. Last year, I got hit in the eye and although my retina didn't detach, I now have posterior vitreous detachment in one eye which makes vision in that eye occassionally blurry and my focussing muscles work harder than before without success. Here's a link on PVD: Posterior Vitreous Detachment

I'd like some ophthamalogist to suck out my vitreous in a syringe and filter it or centrifuge it under steril conditions to remove the debris and then re-inject it back into my eye. Any researchers out there that can do this?
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Old 06-08-2008, 08:46 PM   #26
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I'm 57 and just moved from bifocals to progressives. They're working out well.

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Old 06-08-2008, 09:29 PM   #27
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I'm 57 and just moved from bifocals to progressives. They're working out well.

Coach
That's great!

Progressives were a big disappointment for me. I suspect my neck muscles just aren't coordinated enough for me to get the right correction for a given distance, so nothing was in focus.

I can see why progressives are probably terrific for someone who has better luck with them.
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Old 06-08-2008, 10:54 PM   #28
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I've had glasses since I was 10, but should've had them sooner just didn't know it. Luckily my sight hasn't gotten much worse since age 10, now 28. Can't get much worse without being legally blind. With glasses off and at arms length, I can't read the posts on this page on a 15" flat screen. I would be unable to function without my glasses which is why I keep an extra pair at home and in my car.
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Old 06-13-2008, 09:29 AM   #29
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I've had glasses since I was 10, but should've had them sooner just didn't know it. Luckily my sight hasn't gotten much worse since age 10, now 28. Can't get much worse without being legally blind. With glasses off and at arms length, I can't read the posts on this page on a 15" flat screen. I would be unable to function without my glasses which is why I keep an extra pair at home and in my car.
Sorry, but reading this post just "shouts out" for me to respond ...

Didn't your mother warn you about the practice that you were "performing since age 10" that could make you blind? ... (don't matter what sex U R !!!)

- Ron
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Old 06-13-2008, 10:05 AM   #30
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A lot of people warned me that my eyes would start going when I turned 40, and sure enough, it started. I still have good distance vision but I have to use +1.50 reading glasses much of the time.

I had 20/15 vision for a long time.
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Old 06-13-2008, 10:24 AM   #31
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At my first eye exam (I was 7ish), the doc told me to read the smallest line I could see. I read 'printed in Japan'. There was some discussion afterwards that my eyesight was pretty darn good.

I spent my formative years in the library (bookworm probably doesn't start to cover it)... scientific research be damned, I think those books ruined me. I put off glasses for about 5 years but finally got some last year just before turning 30. I'm slowly growing more nearsighted but figure it might speed up at some point.
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Old 06-17-2008, 12:24 PM   #32
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I'm 44 and have been near sighted for years. I wear contacts but the last 3 years the far sightedness is coming into play. My eye doctor says I am not quite to the bifocal time. Unfortunately I haven't seen the food on my plate in years. Its a big blur! I could be eating anything!
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Old 10-06-2008, 09:53 AM   #33
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I've worn glasses on occasion since my early 20s. I only really need them for longer distances, driving etc, but it's always best to have them checked regularly and make sure your prescription (or lack thereof) is up to date. Working for RNIB (the Royal National Institute of Blind People), I've come across some pretty worrying figures. Your eyesight might be fine, but that doesn't necessarily mean your eyes are healthy; people can lose up to 40% of their vision to conditions like glaucoma before they notice a difference. Eye tests can help pick up these conditions, and ultimately save your sight, so it's always best to keep regular appointments with your optician, just in case.

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Old 10-06-2008, 02:34 PM   #34
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i went thru life with 20/15 vision in a family where almost everyone wore glasses. milkman syndrome? LOL
at age 37, i developed a minor astigmatism, i.e. result was lots of headaches. I finally got smart and got graded index lenses for computer screen distance and reading only.
my eyes have been changing a lot more since age 48, but can still read the computer screen easily. reading glasses are now a must for pill bottles - unreadable without glasses or magnifier.
oh, and annual eye checkups determined i may be a future glaucoma candidate. it is being closely monitored.
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Old 10-06-2008, 06:09 PM   #35
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Just hit 50. Nearsighted. Glasses since age 10, vision is stabilized at about 20/200. I can read tiny fonts close-up, but need the glasses for everything else.
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Old 10-06-2008, 06:15 PM   #36
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I wear reading glasses, and usually wear glasses to drive. But I can pass the test without them. I think I am 20/25 and 20/50.

I did have an odd thing- on a regular optometrist check she said although my pressures were normal, she thought that I had glaucoma because my optic nerves were "cupped". I went to see a glaucoma specialist who did a million tests and follows me annually but says I do not have glaucoma, just an unusual and likely hereditary cupped appearance to my optic nerve.

Anyway, I feel like I get a very good exam each year, and I like that.

Ha
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Old 10-06-2008, 07:07 PM   #37
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I did have an odd thing- on a regular optometrist check she said although my pressures were normal, she thought that I had glaucoma because my optic nerves were "cupped". I went to see a glaucoma specialist who did a million tests and follows me annually but says I do not have glaucoma, just an ususual and likely hereditary cupped appearance to my optic nerve.
Anyway, I feel like I get a very good exam each year, and I like that.
Ha
ditto ditto on the cupped optic nerve thing. i also had pressure at the top end of normal. the good news is we both go for annual full medical eye exams and the unusual cupping was seen and checked out.
my pressure continues just under the upper end of the normal range, but not in the red zone. no glaucoma here, yet. i have my next checkup in mid October. no worries mate!
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Old 10-06-2008, 07:18 PM   #38
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ditto ditto on the cupped optic nerve thing. i also had pressure at the top end of normal. the good news is we both go for annual full medical eye exams and the unusual cupping was seen and checked out.
my pressure continues just under the upper end of the normal range, but not in the red zone. no glaucoma here, yet. i have my next checkup in mid October. no worries mate!
Right! May our good luck continue.

Ha
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Old 10-06-2008, 07:43 PM   #39
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Right! May our good luck continue.

Ha
i forgot to mention i w*rked with lasers a lot during my c*reer. i always wore laser goggles. but i remind my eye doc of that exposure so that he pays extra special attention to me eyeballs.
IF i continue testing with slightly higher pressure, i am slated to start an Rx to lower it BEFORE it causes nerve damage. this month will be the decision point. i feel really good about the EARLY DETECTION of the pressure change. i have no optic nerve damage. whew!!!!
the reason i am continuing on about all this diagnostic screening for the eyes is so other folks here will maybe make an eye checkup exam first thing tomorrow?
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Old 10-06-2008, 07:56 PM   #40
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I still have a ways before 50, but I've always had pretty good vision and just took it for granted. That is until a few months ago and my left eye suddenly went from not even needing contacts to having double vision and the inability to read a computer screen. Was diagnosed with keratoconus in the left, and showing signs of it in the right.

RGP lenses are helping for now, but since it's a progressive disease, the doc said we're probably looking at cornea transplants in a few years given how rapid the onset was.

So, don't take your vision for granted, and take care of those eyes!
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