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HR and workouts
Old 02-17-2016, 03:22 PM   #1
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HR and workouts

Do you you try to stay in Heart rate (HR) target zone when doing your aerobic workouts?
A friend convinced me to workout with a HR chest strap to make sure I stayed in 65-85% of max.
I tend to exercise at or above that %. Seeing good results. Lost 11lbs in 3 months while adding some muscle. For about 7 yrs I had not been able to workout much due to spine surgery and continued spinal issues throughout spine but starting to do more recently. 3 knee surgeries plus sports hernia surgery have slowed me down a bit also. Do treadmill and weight machines two to three days/week and then try to do elliptical and exercise bike on the other two days. I move quickly from station to station on the weight machines and able to keep HR in the 65-85% zone. Like keeping that aerobic also. Move quickly from treadmill to weights or elliptical to bike so HR never gets a chance to fall out of zone. My resting HR has dropped quite a bit from around 70 to mid upper 50's so I know I'm getting benefit. Any way just wondering about HR and your workouts. Thanks
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Old 02-17-2016, 03:25 PM   #2
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I just make sure I keep mine under 110 at all times when working out.
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Old 02-17-2016, 04:12 PM   #3
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I've used a HR strap and monitor for quite a few years and have been particularly pleased to have it on several occasions recently when it indicated an irregular heart rate. I normally like to exercise to no more than 80% of max HR these days. I have had paroxysmal A-Fib for about a year now and my cardio doc says it is fine for me to exercise at this level. Several times now when I have put on the monitor it has been unable to register a HR, or once I start the workout it shoots up to well over 200 bpm. At these times I check my pulse and sure enough it is irregular so I don't exercise hard, simply walk at a brisk pace as long as I don't feel any effects such as being dizzy or light-headed. So far the heart rate has always reset itself within an hour, and despite what the strap and watch may say the actual pulse has never actually raced as evidenced by my manually checking the rate and by my BP monitor at home.
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Old 02-17-2016, 04:32 PM   #4
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I don't have a problem keeping mine at 65%+++. I had a case of tachycardia last year and my doc reviewed my last stress and echocardiogram, encouraged me to exercise. Resting heart rate is normal(60s) now but I can hit 160s with some running. I mostly keep it at 85% but I no longer obsess about it. After living with the tachycardia nonsense for a while it's pretty great now.
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Old 02-17-2016, 04:48 PM   #5
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I overdo it but can't seem to control myself. Been using the Expresso bikes at the gym this winter (think playing a video game by riding a bike, a lot more fun than treadmills/ellipticals). Every day I think I'll try to moderate a bit but usually end up with HR at 160-165 for last 30-40 minutes, sweating like a pig. Not sure what my max is but have had it over 170 a time or two running or on bikes last few years. I'm 64 now.

Had physical a few months ago and discussed it with doctor. He said if I haven't killed myself yet I'll probably be good. My HR has always run high despite a lot of exercise, have minor murmur they echo every 10 years or so. No history of heart disease in family so I figure I'll just keep on.

As an aside reconnected with colleague I'd lost track of who's 69 and last summer he bicycled from Miami to Maine to home in Michigan, did about 60 miles a day. Makes me feel like a slacker but I refuse to road bike with the distracted drivers these days. I'll take my broken bones in the woods courtesy of a mountain bike.
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Old 02-17-2016, 04:56 PM   #6
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I should get something to measure HR. My niece's husband has a Garmin watch with heart rate monitor. I've seen screenshots of his watch at 183bpm. I wonder how accurate HR is coming from a watch. But 183 seems possible given what I'm reading on posts here.
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Old 02-17-2016, 05:09 PM   #7
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I've had a Garmin 610 for about 5 years and really like it. It tracks almost exactly what the gym machines with HRM say.

I posted several years ago about a bike crash in the woods while wearing the Garmin, broke collarbone. It was fascinating to see the HR trace; concussion knocked me out and HR dropped to resting for about 5 minutes, then I awoke and woozily started walking out, got nauseous and sat down and passed out again and HR dropped to 40-50 for about 5 minutes which is about 20 less than my resting! I just found the ability to trace the physiological data with my foggy recollections really fascinating.
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Old 02-17-2016, 05:23 PM   #8
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I believe the general rule of thumb is that max HR should be 220 minus your age.

From Mayo: http://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-li...-20046887?pg=2
The basic way to calculate your maximum heart rate is to subtract your age from 220. For example, if you're 45 years old, subtract 45 from 220 to get a maximum heart rate of 175. This is the maximum number of times your heart should beat per minute while you're exercising.
Once you know your maximum heart rate, you can calculate your desired target heart rate zone — the level at which your heart is being exercised and conditioned but not overworked.
Here's how heart rate matches up with exercise intensity levels:
  • Moderate exercise intensity: 50 to 70 percent of your maximum heart rate
  • Vigorous exercise intensity: 70 to 85 percent of your maximum heart rate
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Old 02-17-2016, 05:26 PM   #9
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I use a HR monitor (Alan has seen me wearing it. ) when exercising. Everybody is different, so you really can't read too much into what other people report. That written, I will still report ....

My resting heart rate is in the low 40s. My max is probably in the 170s.

When I run, I lose water and weight. My heart rate slowly climbs to about 90% of my max, but my average is lower than that. I can run at 90% of max for about 45 minutes. I know some young folks can run at 100% max for long times.

If I ride a bike, my HR is even lower, but I think that is because where I go, I have opportunity to coast or I am drafting another rider.

I could not keep my heart rate at 65% of max and exercise. It just pops right up higher than that. I would not even be breathing hard at 80% of my max heart rate.

I live in a hot (summer) or warm (winter) climate. My heart rate stays lower and I sweat less if it is colder.

As soon as I stop running, my HR drops over the next minute to under 120.

I have noticed improvements in my "perceived exertion" over the last few years. I don't get winded anymore at the same heart rate percentages as I used to.

Oh, I do some vigorous aerobic exercise about an hour a day, 5 days a week.
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Old 02-17-2016, 05:45 PM   #10
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Interesting to hear Various heart rate levels. When I let the machines (treadmill, elliptical and bike) set my rate based on my age its always too easy for me so I would manually adjust it up. Didnt feel like I was getting a "good" workout at those levels. My friend who got me started on this is obsessed with heart rate and staying in a zone. He runs everyday and runs marathons and has been training like this for years. I think it does make my workouts more consistent and does allow me to chart progress. We will see where it goes but as long as it helps keeps me motivated in my workouts then I'm all for it.


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Old 02-17-2016, 05:58 PM   #11
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it probably depends upon your workout goals. If you are exercising for peak performance, i.e. "training" for some competitive purpose, then it is useful. However, if you are exercising for moderate, yet important, improvement in quality of life, and longevity of life, you don't need it, and in fact, may be counter-productive to long term success.
I say that because if you focus on maintaining certain heart rate levels, you will likely find that the intensity of your work-outs will lead to burn-out.
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Old 02-17-2016, 06:39 PM   #12
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Like LOL! I always track my HR for 60 seconds after I stop and as long as it drops by 20 to 30 bpm from its peak then I'm happy.

My at rest HR is normally in the low 50's. A year ago it was often in the 40's but since I don't exercise as vigorously as I used to it has come up somewhat.
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Old 02-17-2016, 07:14 PM   #13
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My HR is generally at ~90% when doing aerobic workouts. 60s at rest, 140 on the elliptical.
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Old 02-17-2016, 08:35 PM   #14
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If you do outdoor exercises (walk, run, bike, hike, etc.) I would suggest taking it a step further and get one of the GPS sports watches that includes a heart rate monitor. Most of the major manufacturers make them, well worth it IMO. Typically they have a web site where you download the data from your watch and it presents it in several graphs. It shows your route on a google type map and you can see your heart rate, pace, or speed at any point in time/distance/elevation. Great for tracking changes to your fitness over time.
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Old 02-18-2016, 08:40 AM   #15
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Right now I try to stay in a heart rate zone of 128-136 bpm when I run. This is slow easy running: around 10 min/mile pace, even slower up hills. I am working on building my base back up right now. My resting heart rate is around 50 bpm. I am 51 y/o female.

My runs are usually 7 -10 miles long right now, so I am working out in that range for 70-100 mins.

I use a garmin forerunner 220 with a chest strap. I dont always wear the chest strap. I wear it periodically to check my perceived effort against my heart rate.

I would like to run a marathon or ultra again and I am under the impression that running in this range will improve my endurance.

It sounds like your workout is indeed benefiting your heart! good work :-)
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Old 02-18-2016, 11:49 AM   #16
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HR Equipment.

Being the frugal type, I use my Android smart phone with a Bluetooth chest strap (Polar brand). I then use fitness apps like SportTracker and skiTracks to record the workout, ski trip, hike, and mountain bike activities.

The recorded workout has GPS (location, distance, altitude gain, speed and Max Speed)and HR data.
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Old 02-18-2016, 04:37 PM   #17
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Since I'm on a medication for afib that reduces my HR measuring it is meaningless for me. My cardiologist told me that I should be able to carry on a conversation, but not easily, so that's the guideline I use. Cheaper than all that other stuff folks are buying....
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Old 02-18-2016, 10:15 PM   #18
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I do have a Garmin Forerunner 210 with chest strap that I'm using now . I use the indoors mode when running on the treadmill and other indoor exercise equipment then download it to Garmin Connect. Have had tne Garmin for about 4 yrs or so but never used the HR monitor till now.. Like going back and looking at satelite view of where I traveled especially areas when I was somewhere new. Thanks for your feedback


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Old 02-18-2016, 10:20 PM   #19
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10:00 min/mi to me is moving pretty good. That's a nice HR you have there for that pace. Good luck on potential marathon runs. Farthest race I ever did was a 25k back in 01,02 and 03. Now knees and spine could never take that kind of pounding any more. 😩


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Old 02-18-2016, 10:23 PM   #20
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Lol
Isn't how fast and how far your HR drops down after exercise and indicator of how fit you are. I can't remember the metrics for that.


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