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I'm not the only one made 'high risk' by silly things!
Old 07-04-2010, 01:35 PM   #1
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I'm not the only one made 'high risk' by silly things!

At least now I know I'm not alone.

"Applicants dismayed as minor medical conditions lead to insurance denials or big hike in premiums"

Quote:
Ralf Burgert had no idea how costly toenail fungus could be.
The San Rafael resident got rid of the common infection by treating it with the prescription medication Lamisil. It was the last thing on his mind when he applied for a health insurance policy on the individual market a short time later.
He could not believe the response: Because of the toenail fungus, an insurer informed him, he would be in a higher-risk insurance pool with a 50 percent jump in premiums. Burgert was flabbergasted.
I'm pretty sure someone [MOD EDIT] will be along shortly to explain the terribly high cost of Lamisil, and how toenail fungus sufferers are prone to unreasonably high medical expenses.
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Old 07-04-2010, 03:47 PM   #2
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This must have been before the generic came out, as it is now <$30 for 30 pills.

I don't get how you are considered high risk because of the fungus. Does that make anyone who has had a yeast infection or athlete's foot high risk? I would dare say that is 50% or more of the population.
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Old 07-04-2010, 04:44 PM   #3
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Or, maybe the insurance company takes a dim view of anyone who files an insurance claim for something that is usually treated effectively with OTC meds. "We'll be paying $100 every time this guy catches a cold. And, his kids."
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Old 07-04-2010, 04:44 PM   #4
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It looks like it might be time for a little ER forum health insurance poll. Back in a moment.
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Old 07-04-2010, 04:58 PM   #5
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Or, maybe the insurance company takes a dim view of anyone who files an insurance claim for something that is usually treated effectively with OTC meds. "We'll be paying $100 every time this guy catches a cold. And, his kids."
Yah. If this is the case, it might be a god reason to go to cash-only minor care (perhaps under an assumed name), to avoid getting trashed in the Medical Information Bureau (MIB), the central database of medical information shared by insurance companies, and catastrophic insurance coverage only.

I've mentioned before that I got bumped to high risk status by a single noncancerous, non-precancerous colon polyp found many years ago, and as a result I cannot get catastrophic coverage only. The insurer says that's for low risk people only. Naturally they share through MIB that I've been declined insurance (yay antitrust exemption!), so no other insurer will give me a high deductible catastrophic coverage policy.
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Old 07-04-2010, 05:18 PM   #6
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I've mentioned before that I got bumped to high risk status by a single noncancerous, non-precancerous colon polyp found many years ago, and as a result I cannot get catastrophic coverage only. The insurer says that's for low risk people only. Naturally they share through MIB that I've been declined insurance (yay antitrust exemption!), so no other insurer will give me a high deductible catastrophic coverage policy.
Have you ever been able to determine whether any of the insurance fuss has anything to do with lifetime exposure to ionizing radiation or asbestos-filled steam pipe lagging?

I'm starting to see a lot of the latter in our alumni magazine from nukes of the 1960s & '70s. I've also noticed that everyone these days has been cutting way back on exposure limits (perhaps with good reason) to the point that my 311 mrem from the early 1990s would stick out like a sore thumb now.
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Old 07-04-2010, 05:25 PM   #7
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... my 311 mrem from the early 1990s would stick out like a sore thumb now.
Yeah, but the real question is does it glow in the dark? (No, your thumb.)
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Old 07-04-2010, 05:37 PM   #8
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Actually, it's sort of useful. We don't need night lights at my house.
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Old 07-04-2010, 08:12 PM   #9
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I was denied coverage and ended up in the state risk pool due to a small bone defect in my next-to-little toe. No surgery ever recommended, but it blew my ability to get a standard individual policy and not lose coverage for pre-existing conditions.

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Old 07-04-2010, 08:21 PM   #10
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Have you ever been able to determine whether any of the insurance fuss has anything to do with lifetime exposure to ionizing radiation or asbestos-filled steam pipe lagging?
Y'know, that never even came up on the applications I filled out. It certainly wasn't listed as a cause for refusing coverage. One more excuse for rescission...

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I'm starting to see a lot of the latter in our alumni magazine from nukes of the 1960s & '70s. I've also noticed that everyone these days has been cutting way back on exposure limits (perhaps with good reason) to the point that my 311 mrem from the early 1990s would stick out like a sore thumb now.
I've heard of folks with pre-existing asbestos related conditions being denied coverage, and of being stuck with riders denying coverage for lung cancer, silicosis, fibrosis and erythema. I haven't heard of anything for folks with low level radiation exposure. 311 mrem? Too many RC closeouts, or maybe the odd steam generator eddy current probe? (I only exposed my right arm and head doing that, fortunately. Stupid robot...)
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Old 07-05-2010, 08:31 AM   #11
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If you've been uninsured due to a pre-existing condition for more than 6 months, you can now apply for coverage under Obama's new health reform law.

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Old 07-05-2010, 12:06 PM   #12
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Yeah, but the real question is does it glow in the dark? (No, your thumb.)
Only for five half-lengths lives...

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Originally Posted by M Paquette View Post
311 mrem? Too many RC closeouts...
Those ol' S3G Core 3 plants trapped a lot of crud and I was the chem-radcon guy for my first year of sea duty. The rest of my first sea tour it was "Hey, Nords, you're supposed to be studying for the engineer's exam, why don't you get in there and draw yourself a picture while you're closing it out?"

The control point watch actually used to call out the exposure time while I was scrambling around in there with the closeout checklist. I also learned that just because the plant is "cooled down" to under 180 degrees F doesn't mean that it's safe to lean your bare arm up against a steam generator bracket. Luckily I finished frisking out at the control point before the blisters formed, and the watchstanders assumed the grilled-meat smell was coming from the mess decks. No way was I going to admit to anyone that the radcon guy had picked burned himself in the RC, but the experience certainly made its mark on me.

I'm sure the VA medical screeners will someday give me all the sympathy I deserve...
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