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Old 08-16-2012, 10:52 AM   #61
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Often the LDL particle count is concordant with LDL-C, but not always.

Ha
Thanks for the information on the lab. Does their cholesterol count differentiat between the big fluffy LDL and the smaller, nasty LDL particles? That seems important these days. My latest results from my physical don't show this, just a total LDL.
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Old 08-16-2012, 03:53 PM   #62
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Thanks for the information on the lab. Does their cholesterol count differentiat between the big fluffy LDL and the smaller, nasty LDL particles? That seems important these days. My latest results from my physical don't show this, just a total LDL.
You can estimate this quickly by just looking at your triglycerides/HDL ratio.

A ratio above 3.5 would be enough to worry you, while a ratio under 2.0 would give you some comfort that you have mostly the big, fluffy LDL particles.

My ratio is 1.1, and I attribute it mainly to my LCHF diet.

A couple of references:
Assessment of LDL particle size by trig... [J Atheroscler Thromb. 2003] - PubMed - NCBI
The Cholesterol Delusion And Why LDL Particle Size (and Trig/HDL Ratio) Is So Important
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Old 08-16-2012, 04:47 PM   #63
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Originally Posted by braumeister

You can estimate this quickly by just looking at your triglycerides/HDL ratio.

A ratio above 3.5 would be enough to worry you, while a ratio under 2.0 would give you some comfort that you have mostly the big, fluffy LDL particles.

My ratio is 1.1, and I attribute it mainly to my LCHF diet.

A couple of references:
Assessment of LDL particle size by trig... [J Atheroscler Thromb. 2003] - PubMed - NCBI
The Cholesterol Delusion And Why LDL Particle Size (and Trig/HDL Ratio) Is So Important
Following up and reading your links and then read something that appears in agreement with you.

Therefore, in adults, the triglyceride/HDL-"good" cholesterol ratio should be below 2 (just divide your triglycerides level by your HDL).

Or more precisely, the triglyceride/HDL ratio:

2 or less is considered ideal
4 - high
6 - much too high
And, since HDL (high density lipoprotein) is protective against heart disease, the lower the ratio, the better.

In other words, the lower your triglycerides, or the higher your HDL, the smaller this ratio becomes.

It is now believed that the triglycerides/HDL ratio is one of the most potent predictors of heart disease.




A Harvard-lead study author reported:

"High triglycerides alone increased the risk of heart attack nearly three-fold.

And people with the highest ratio of triglycerides to HDL -- the "good" cholesterol -- had 16 times the risk of heart attack as those with the lowest ratio of triglycerides to HDL in the study of 340 heart attack patients and 340 of their healthy, same age counterparts.

The ratio of triglycerides to HDL was the strongest predictor of a heart attack, even more accurate than the LDL/HDL ratio (Circulation 1997;96:2520-2525)."

My ratio isn't as good as yours but I checked my records and went from about a 4 to 1 ratio (tri's were real high) to 2.1 to 1 ratio in one year and all I did was eat oatmeal with apple and walnuts daily, cutting back on favorite food group (potato chips) and taking fish oil. My triglycerides were slashed in half down to about 80. I never really followed triglycerides and didn't really know how important they are in relation to risk of coronary problems.
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Dilemma on statins
Old 08-16-2012, 08:43 PM   #64
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Dilemma on statins

It's a dilemma for people who are told by their doctors they need to take a statin drug to lower cholesterol. Some people get no side-effects from statins, at least not ones they notice - which is kind of scary in itself, that you could be losing your memory, for example, without realizing it. Other people have pretty obvious side-effects. I was in that category with muscle pain, weakness, lousy digestion, chronic fatigue but couldn't sleep well. I often heard coenzyme q10 suggested with statins, but it didn't help me at all. One thing that does help a lot is biocritical priora which is also natural and has coenzyme q10 in a special formula. I for one, get peace of mind knowing that my cholesterol is lower, and since I don't have to struggle with side-effects, I have more energy to spend on the things that are important to me. Not everyone is able to just change diet and exercise more, though at least we should try to do our best at that too. Easier said than done if you ask me.
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Old 08-17-2012, 06:44 AM   #65
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Not everyone is able to just change diet and exercise more,
Not true although it might not bring your cholesterol numbers into line
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Easier said than done if you ask me.
True
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Triglycerides
Old 08-17-2012, 03:25 PM   #66
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Triglycerides

Many people -- including many doctors -- are still under the impression that high triglycerides are due solely to high protein/high fat diets. Much emphasis (while they mention carbs) is still put on fats on many of the medical websites. As it turns out, bad carbs (sugar, HFCS) can have much more effect on triglyceride levels than proteins & fats for some people. A few years back I went on a high protein/high (good) fat/low carb diet, and my triglyceride levels dropped like a stone (after decades of low-fat diets that did nothing).

Everyone's metabolism is different, which is why no single diet works for everyone. Finding what one's metabolism likes and dislikes is the key, but that can take some effort (trial & error).

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Old 08-17-2012, 04:28 PM   #67
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One thing I want to know... You mention you ate grassfed beef - was it most of the time? And it still raised your LDL compared to chicken/fish? I am a little surprised, because my understanidng is that the amount of saturated fat in grassfed beef (about 10% of fat is saturated) is as low as what's in a chicken breast. And grassfed beef contains more omega-3 than chicken. This is not to say I'd rather eat grassfed beef than pasture fed chicken though. (I don't really like grassfed beef.)
Hello again tmm99. I ate grassfed been only some of the time. To me, it seemed expensive and tough. Also, I was eating grassfed ground beef from Trader Joe, and really, I didn't like it much compared to much fatter ground meat from QFC.

I think someone wrote earlier than he felt that for many of us who live on the coasts, the cheapest way to get wild meat is wild ocean fish and shellfish. Since I like this better anyway, I think this will be the largest part of my protein.

Ha
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Old 08-17-2012, 08:53 PM   #68
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Mevacor..........the wonder drug. I pay $9.62 for a 90 day supply. A pretty cheap way to keep all my numbers in good shape. No side effects that I can tell. Did I mention it cost $9.62?

I do eat reasonably well, but I'm not given up beef entirely. I like a good juicy burger once a week and a steak maybe once a month. I do eat a lot of baked chicken and fish. Not really a sacrifice as I enjoy both. But I do eat them fried on occasions. I'm southern you know.

So count me in the somewhat balanced but lazy camp.
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Old 08-17-2012, 09:49 PM   #69
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Ha got me to thinking about my lunches. I am going to focus more on healthy lunches now. ...
Any other easy to prepare ideas?
Easy prep salads are something to consider. One can buy all the ingredients fresh on the weekend and then "build" salads in those plastic chinese food containers that are like shallow round dishes. I don't even wash the ingredients but just put them in the bowls:

1. Bag/container of baby spinach, lettuce or other greens.
2. Cherry tomatoes
3. Small carrots
4. Slice a mushroom or two and divide among the 4 to 5 salads you are making
5. Fresh blueberries
6. Craisens, raisens, dried cranberries, or dried cherries
7. Walnuts, pecans, or other nuts
8. Protein (see below).

So except for the mushrooms, no cutting, slicing or other prep needed. Just divide up the bits and pieces into the containers.

A bag of croutons and bottle of salad dressing and you are good to go.

The 8. Protein usually comes from leftovers, but could be a boiled egg. Example of leftovers: Fajita meat, barbecue meat, cheese stick, grilled fish or salmon, roast beef, leftover chinese food, edamame, etc. Whatever you have in the fridge and it doesn't have to be much because the salad is lots to eat. This also makes each salad slightly different so you aren't bored eating the same thing every day.

OK, you have to like salad and you have to not worry about washing anything, but if you are OK with that, the lunch meal is cheap and easy to prepare. It's almost as if you went out in the woods and found the bits and pieces yourself and made lunch from it. Of course, you went to the grocery store instead.
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Old 08-17-2012, 11:30 PM   #70
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Originally Posted by haha

Hello again tmm99. I ate grassfed been only some of the time. To me, it seemed expensive and tough. Also, I was eating grassfed ground beef from Trader Joe, and really, I didn't like it much compared to much fatter ground meat from QFC.

I think someone wrote earlier than he felt that for many of us who live on the coasts, the cheapest way to get wild meat is wild ocean fish and shellfish. Since I like this better anyway, I think this will be the largest part of my protein.

Ha
I can relate. I don't like grass fed beef much either. I would eat pasture fed chicken and pork over feedlot kind any time (there is a huge difference in the taste and smell to me.), but grass fed beef? Not so much.
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Old 08-18-2012, 09:52 AM   #71
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Easy prep salads are something to consider. One can buy all the ingredients fresh on the weekend and then "build" salads in those plastic chinese food containers that are like shallow round dishes. I don't even wash the ingredients but just put them in the bowls:

1. Bag/container of baby spinach, lettuce or other greens.
2. Cherry tomatoes
3. Small carrots
4. Slice a mushroom or two and divide among the 4 to 5 salads you are making
5. Fresh blueberries
6. Craisens, raisens, dried cranberries, or dried cherries
7. Walnuts, pecans, or other nuts
8. Protein (see below).
...
Good idea LOL. I'll try this a few times per week to start.

We do have salads, sometimes big ones at dinner. And in the morning I make a fruit bowl with items from 5, 6, and 7 above. Personally, I'd wash everything as have heard and read this is a good practice.

Actually it's quite fast and easy to make a lunch with items 2, 3, 4 plus a half sandwich. Might add things like radish, olives, etc. Finger foods that don't have to be cut up.
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Old 08-18-2012, 04:04 PM   #72
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I take a 1-lb. bag of frozen vegetables ($1.50 a bag) to work each morning and put it on a desk that is warm from cables running underneath it. By lunchtime it's thawed enough to eat.

Pluses:
-The most convenient ever. Zero preparation time.
-Never worry about fresh-bought vegetables spoiling in fridge because I didn't eat them fast enough.

Minuses:
-Melted vegetable water sometimes flows out from bag onto desk. Put it on top of throwaway paper.
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