Join Early Retirement Today
Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Looking for a recommendation for hiking shoes
Old 05-24-2015, 10:50 PM   #1
Moderator Emeritus
aja8888's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: The Woodlands, TX
Posts: 7,166
Looking for a recommendation for hiking shoes

I have given up running (years ago) and now have a hip implant (very successful) and do a reasonable amount of dog walking and general fitness walking. Terrain is not especially challenging and I would guess it's mostly concrete pathways and light wooded trails. No climbing mountains (hey, there are none here!) or walking across creeks.

I wore out a pair of Vasque Men's Juxt Multisport in less than a year on this light duty effort. Here are those shoes:

http://www.amazon.com/Vasque-Mens-Ju.../dp/B0041FHZAS

Now I wish to replace the above with a shoe that has better gripping (the Vasque were not that great) and has some longivity. There are countless brands out there and any help culling them down to a suitable choice will be appreciated. I am looking at the Merrel products but would like to rely on some experienced folks here.

Thanks in advance for any suggestions.
__________________

__________________
......."Everybody has a plan until they get punched in the face." -- philosopher Mike Tyson.
aja8888 is offline   Reply With Quote
Join the #1 Early Retirement and Financial Independence Forum Today - It's Totally Free!

Are you planning to be financially independent as early as possible so you can live life on your own terms? Discuss successful investing strategies, asset allocation models, tax strategies and other related topics in our online forum community. Our members range from young folks just starting their journey to financial independence, military retirees and even multimillionaires. No matter where you fit in you'll find that Early-Retirement.org is a great community to join. Best of all it's totally FREE!

You are currently viewing our boards as a guest so you have limited access to our community. Please take the time to register and you will gain a lot of great new features including; the ability to participate in discussions, network with our members, see fewer ads, upload photographs, create a retirement blog, send private messages and so much, much more!

Old 05-24-2015, 11:05 PM   #2
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso) Give me a forum ...
REWahoo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Location: Texas Hill Country
Posts: 42,123
Not sure how experienced I am but I do know these are the most comfortable hiking shoes I've ever owned, by far: Teva Kitma Mesh WP Hiking Shoes

Also comes in a non-waterproof version: Teva Kitma Mesh Hiking Shoes
__________________

__________________
Numbers is hard

When I hit 70, it hit back

Retired in 2005 at age 58, no pension
REWahoo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-24-2015, 11:07 PM   #3
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
zinger1457's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Posts: 1,453
I prefer to use trail running shoes when doing shorter day hikes. They have the sole of a hiking shoe for gripping but are lighter than your typical hiking shoe, I find them more comfortable. New Balance makes decent ones and they usually offer their shoes in wider widths which I need. Merrell makes good hiking shoes, I have a pair that I use for the more difficult/longer hikes where I need additional support.
__________________
zinger1457 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-24-2015, 11:08 PM   #4
Moderator Emeritus
aja8888's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: The Woodlands, TX
Posts: 7,166
Quote:
Originally Posted by zinger1457 View Post
I prefer to use trail running shoes when doing shorter day hikes. They have the sole of a hiking shoe for gripping but are lighter than your typical hiking shoe, I find them more comfortable. New Balance makes decent ones and they usually offer their shoes in wider widths which I need. Merrell makes good hiking shoes, I use them for the more difficult/longer hikes where I need additional support.
When I ran a lot, I was a New Balance fan. I'll have a look, thanks.
__________________
......."Everybody has a plan until they get punched in the face." -- philosopher Mike Tyson.
aja8888 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-24-2015, 11:29 PM   #5
Moderator Emeritus
aja8888's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: The Woodlands, TX
Posts: 7,166
Quote:
Originally Posted by REWahoo View Post
Not sure how experienced I am but I do know these are the most comfortable hiking shoes I've ever owned, by far: Teva Kitma Mesh WP Hiking Shoes

Also comes in a non-waterproof version: Teva Kitma Mesh Hiking Shoes
Thanks! Nice shoe but many of the Teva selections don't seem to come in my size (13) when looking on Amazon. Maybe other stores will carry 13? I'll have a look tomorrow.
__________________
......."Everybody has a plan until they get punched in the face." -- philosopher Mike Tyson.
aja8888 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-25-2015, 05:19 AM   #6
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
bUU's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Location: Georgia
Posts: 1,914
Quote:
Originally Posted by aja8888 View Post
I am looking at the Merrel products but would like to rely on some experienced folks here.
For hiking, I would rely on Merrell. Comfortable, rugged, durable.

Hiking Footwear - Hiking Boots & Shoes | Merrell
__________________
bUU is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-25-2015, 05:26 AM   #7
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
braumeister's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Northern Kentucky
Posts: 8,615
First advice is to go to an REI store. They will have a good selection and generally knowledgable sales staff.

I've been wearing a pair of Lowa Renegade Pro GTX boots for a few years and they are the most comfortable hiking shoes I've ever owned. Perfect right out of the box, no break-in needed, and good support:

DW swears by her Ahnu hiking boots.

Vasque and Salomon are also favorite names of mine.
__________________
braumeister is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 05-25-2015, 06:05 AM   #8
Moderator
Ronstar's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: A little ways southwest of Chicago
Posts: 9,356
I have two pairs of Merrell hiking shoes. One is 5-10 years old and I use them for hiking the mountains/desert in Arizona. My other pair is a hiking boot with the vibram sole. Very good for Illinois hikes where I'm trudging through snow/water. Both are holding up well and provide excellent traction and comfort. The arizona pair grip the slick rock very well, while the Illinois pair take me up and down icy slopes without a problem. I pop my orthotics in them for more support. I've had other brands, but I will continue to buy Merrells for their traction, durability and comfort. I get mine at REI.
__________________
Ronstar is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-25-2015, 06:32 AM   #9
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
travelover's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Posts: 9,896
I've found that fit is more important than brand. Boots vary in key characteristics by brand, so try on a number of different brands at a place like REI (where they have an inclined surface to try boots) to get the best fit. I find toe room on downhills to be especially important for me.
__________________
Yes, I have achieved work / life balance.
travelover is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-25-2015, 10:03 AM   #10
Recycles dryer sheets
 
Join Date: Aug 2014
Location: Phoenix
Posts: 473
I've had good luck with Columbia hiking shoes typically buying them at Famous Footwear. Reasonably priced too. I agree with travelover that fit is critical; I can usually tell pretty easily if a shoe will be comfortable or not just by a few minutes in the store. Since I found the model of Columbia that I like, I'll just get the same when my current ones wear out.
__________________
Ian S is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-25-2015, 10:30 AM   #11
Moderator Emeritus
aja8888's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: The Woodlands, TX
Posts: 7,166
Quote:
Originally Posted by travelover View Post
I've found that fit is more important than brand. Boots vary in key characteristics by brand, so try on a number of different brands at a place like REI (where they have an inclined surface to try boots) to get the best fit. I find toe room on downhills to be especially important for me.
Thanks for all the comments so far.

From what I can tell, there are two REI stores near me, the closest about 25 miles away. I guess I can check that store out this week.

Reading reviews of various shoes, there are many recent complaints from people replacing the shoes they had (same model) and the quality being degraded for fit and comfort. The complainants seem to believe the manufacturers have purposely cheapened the product over time. This was reviewing Merrel, Vasque, and New Balance shoes. Maybe a fit test is in order rather than an Amazon order.
__________________
......."Everybody has a plan until they get punched in the face." -- philosopher Mike Tyson.
aja8888 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-25-2015, 10:35 AM   #12
Recycles dryer sheets
 
Join Date: Feb 2014
Location: Medford
Posts: 68
Quote:
Originally Posted by travelover View Post
I've found that fit is more important than brand. Boots vary in key characteristics by brand, so try on a number of different brands at a place like REI (where they have an inclined surface to try boots) to get the best fit. I find toe room on downhills to be especially important for me.
I totally agree with travelover. I wear Keen, and while they are great for me, not everyone can wear them. I wanted to like the Merrell, but just can't wear them. I also agree that a trail runner is a great option and that REI is a great place to start. Plus if you get something that doesn't work out they can be returned within one year for any reason.
__________________
SDHiker is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-25-2015, 10:47 AM   #13
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
Lsbcal's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: west coast, hi there!
Posts: 5,692
REI is a great place to buy shoes. They have a fantastic return policy and I've returned a few pairs over the years. One pair of Merrills started bugging me after 6 months and they took them back. Of course, one should walk around in the house for a few days with a new pair to be sure before getting them on the road.

For very light hikes that one does not need ankle support or protection on, I'd think good quality running shoes are fine. They often have the best comfort and fit and lots of tread. Any shoe should be replaced after the shock absorbtion or tread starts to go.
__________________
Lsbcal is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 05-25-2015, 11:42 AM   #14
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
calmloki's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Independence
Posts: 5,459
I'm also hunting - a friend found a pair of Vasque Breeze (model 7080) by a trail out in the desert. Soles looked good with no odd wear pattern, they fit, so after running them through the washer I started wearing them. Fun to try and imagine what would cause a pair of shoes to be deserted along a trail several miles from civilization. After 1 1/2 years of wear and a normal mile or two per day on concrete the heels have worn through to the inner pad. The new Breeze are different, the Vasque Moab look right but don't feel right, Merrils don't feel right - sucks when you find something that really works for you and then can't replace it.
__________________
calmloki is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-25-2015, 12:15 PM   #15
Full time employment: Posting here.
bjorn2bwild's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Location: Western US
Posts: 690
Quote:
Originally Posted by aja8888 View Post
Reading reviews of various shoes, there are many recent complaints from people replacing the shoes they had (same model) and the quality being degraded for fit and comfort. The complainants seem to believe the manufacturers have purposely cheapened the product over time.
I refrained from writing that ^ as I was not sure my experience was reflective of other brands. I have a long history with Montrail, there was a definite drop-off in quality once they were acquired by Columbia.
My new favorite trail runner is La Sportiva 'crosslite'. I am an avid trail runner and a hiker. In both cases I like an aggressive tread made with high carbon rubber (it is noticeably stiffer by feel) for longer wear.
One problem with specific recommendations is the fast turnover of inventory - by the time I wear the shoe out, the exact replacement is no longer available.
__________________
How's it going to end..............
bjorn2bwild is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-25-2015, 12:24 PM   #16
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
Brat's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: Portland, Oregon
Posts: 5,914
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ian S View Post
I've had good luck with Columbia hiking shoes typically buying them at Famous Footwear. Reasonably priced too. I agree with travelover that fit is critical; I can usually tell pretty easily if a shoe will be comfortable or not just by a few minutes in the store. Since I found the model of Columbia that I like, I'll just get the same when my current ones wear out.
Columbia owns Merrell. They may share some features but without a doubt Merrell is the more robust.

I agree, go to REI to find the right shoe for your feet.
__________________
Duck bjorn.
Brat is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-25-2015, 12:29 PM   #17
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
 
Join Date: Jan 2014
Posts: 1,318
Quote:
Originally Posted by aja8888 View Post
I have given up running (years ago) and now have a hip implant (very successful) and do a reasonable amount of dog walking and general fitness walking. Terrain is not especially challenging and I would guess it's mostly concrete pathways and light wooded trails. No climbing mountains (hey, there are none here!) or walking across creeks.

I wore out a pair of Vasque Men's Juxt Multisport in less than a year on this light duty effort. Here are those shoes:

http://www.amazon.com/Vasque-Mens-Ju.../dp/B0041FHZAS

Now I wish to replace the above with a shoe that has better gripping (the Vasque were not that great) and has some longivity.
AJA, Concrete pathways are very wearing on the soles of shoes whether sneakers or boots or shoes. The shoes that you show are a sneaker and should be replaced every 6 months or less depending on how many miles you put on them. It doesn't sound like you need a boot. Hiking sneakers or trail sneakers are great but they can also be a tripping hazard because of the grip.
I second all the recommendations for REI, REI – Top-Brand Clothing, Gear, Footwear and Expert Advice for All Your Outdoor Adventures - REI.com I can't order shoes online because I need to try before I buy. I do buy at other shoe stores but really like REI. As someone else said it's the fit not necessarily the brand.
__________________
splitwdw is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-25-2015, 12:59 PM   #18
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
Lsbcal's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: west coast, hi there!
Posts: 5,692
Quote:
Originally Posted by aja8888 View Post
... As someone else said it's the fit not necessarily the brand.
That's so true. The shoe manufacturers are forever tinkering with their designs or making them in another country with somewhat different materials. In running shoes I always try them on unless it's the exact same model and year. I've had ASIC, Nike, Brooks and currently Saucauny for running shoes.

Their are some very good sales right now at REI. I think some of the sales items might end today (5/25). I just bought a pair of Brooks for city walking on line at a great discount and they fit great. They ship free if over $50 and one can return them to the store for a refund.
__________________
Lsbcal is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 05-25-2015, 01:10 PM   #19
Recycles dryer sheets
shortstop14's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Posts: 221
I've had good success with Merrill over the last decade. My everyday wear trail runners hold up pretty well considering the amount of use I put on them, and the hiking boots have lasted for years with less frequent use. The models with GoreTex lining work well for the wet sloppy conditions common in the Pacific Northwest.
__________________
shortstop14 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-25-2015, 04:26 PM   #20
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
RunningBum's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Posts: 5,193
Quote:
Originally Posted by bjorn2bwild View Post
I refrained from writing that ^ as I was not sure my experience was reflective of other brands. I have a long history with Montrail, there was a definite drop-off in quality once they were acquired by Columbia.
My new favorite trail runner is La Sportiva 'crosslite'. I am an avid trail runner and a hiker. In both cases I like an aggressive tread made with high carbon rubber (it is noticeably stiffer by feel) for longer wear.
One problem with specific recommendations is the fast turnover of inventory - by the time I wear the shoe out, the exact replacement is no longer available.
Same here (bolded part). I used to be a loyal Montrail wearer, and the quality turned so bad that I will never buy them again. Tread would separate from the sole on multiple pairs, they would tear easily, and so on. I'm not usually anti any brand but Montrail lost me and I will never recommend them.

I'm a bit surprised that the OP's Vasque's got slippery considering the terrain they are used on. Perhaps something with that specific model. A year is not that bad though. 500 miles is the general rule for running, can probably go a bit longer for walking but 500 would be 2 miles x 5 days a week. Usually it is the inner cushioning that goes before tread and you may not be able to easily see when it's time to replace, but new shoes will feel a lot better.

For my own trail running I now go with Altra, since they have a unique foot shaped toe box that helps with my neuroma issue, plus they have good cushioning and tread for a lightweight shoe.

I'd think that New Balance would be a good option too. They have a good rep for a reason, that they are comfortable and good quality.

I have trouble going by fit in the store, because most shoes will feel good for a little while unless you can detect toes rubbing, or too narrow of a fit. It's also hard to know how they will wear. It helps to know if you need pronation control or not.
__________________

__________________
RunningBum is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Swiss heartland voters ban nude hiking in Alps MasterBlaster Other topics 6 04-27-2009 02:34 PM
Favorite Hiking Trails shiny Life after FIRE 24 06-30-2005 05:27 PM

 

 
All times are GMT -6. The time now is 11:04 AM.
 
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.