Join Early Retirement Today
Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 08-18-2011, 12:20 PM   #21
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Posts: 2,423
My PCP's office is all digital and I love it. She comes in with her laptop and we go over all the blood test results and if I want a copy printed she can do that and I pick it up at the appointment desk on my way out. She has easy access to all my history. I do feel like for the first 5 minutes she's looking at the screen rather than me but after that her attention is directed at me.

The office also has an online patient portal where I can check statements, appointments and prescriptions. If I need a refill I can ask for that and she will get a message and send it in. All prescriptions are electronic unless you ask for paper ones.

In February and March I had a mammogram and then a couple of biopsies. The specialist that I went to for the first biopsy wasn't affiliated with the same hospital system as the mammogram facility so I had to go back to the mammogram place, pick up my films and take them to my appointment. When I later needed a biopsy under ultrasound the hospital for that procedure was the same as the mammogram facility so they had access to my films digitally. They even had my previous years films in digital form, which was nice. Zoom in, compare side by side and make digital notes. Very efficient.

BTW, I was lucky and everything was negative.
__________________

__________________
Married, both 62. DH retired June, 2010. I have a pleasant little part time job.
Sue J is offline   Reply With Quote
Join the #1 Early Retirement and Financial Independence Forum Today - It's Totally Free!

Are you planning to be financially independent as early as possible so you can live life on your own terms? Discuss successful investing strategies, asset allocation models, tax strategies and other related topics in our online forum community. Our members range from young folks just starting their journey to financial independence, military retirees and even multimillionaires. No matter where you fit in you'll find that Early-Retirement.org is a great community to join. Best of all it's totally FREE!

You are currently viewing our boards as a guest so you have limited access to our community. Please take the time to register and you will gain a lot of great new features including; the ability to participate in discussions, network with our members, see fewer ads, upload photographs, create a retirement blog, send private messages and so much, much more!

Old 08-18-2011, 12:52 PM   #22
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
TromboneAl's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Posts: 11,197
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nords View Post
Instead, this medical-records chaos is an entrepreneur's fantasy. Let them sort it out so that all the medical institutions have to get on board or get bought out.
Just hope that your betamax doctor can talk to the VHS doctor. Or your Blu-ray doctor can talk to your HD DVD doc.
__________________

__________________
Al
TromboneAl is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-18-2011, 01:25 PM   #23
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
harley's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: Following the nice weather
Posts: 6,427
Quote:
Originally Posted by calmloki View Post
The Oregon flavour Kaiser Permanente health insurance company shows how things can be done: all electronic, records accessed from any KP office, pretty much one stop shop buildings - PCP visits, immunization clinic, blood draw unit, echo/x-ray unit, pharmacy, optical unit... You can check in at the front, show your ID and pay the co-pay, and then cycle through the various stations. Fast, efficient, and no multiple iterations of "name, address, sex, are you allergic to.., etc." Gotta believe it saves KP and me money and know it saves me time and frustration.

When we were down in California we discovered that the California KP is different than the Oregon KP - had to request a California KP ID number - but once I did that the KP system worked just the same and my records were right on tap for the California offices use.
I'm with Kaiser Mid Atlantic. Their systems are fantastic too. Online mail order prescription refills, same or next day test results with email notifications when they're ready, full medical records at the doc's fingertips, automated reminders for various things, ability to email a question and get a response from the doc or NP. Only problem I've seen is that there's a glitch in the system that keeps reloading an old work phone number as my secondary contact number no matter how many times and ways I get it changed. But not a big deal since the primary number is right. I've been truly impressed with the improvements over the past 5 years or so.
__________________
"Good judgment comes from experience. Experience comes from bad judgement." - Will Rogers, or maybe Sam Clemens
DW and I - FIREd at 50 (7/06), living off assets
harley is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 08-18-2011, 03:21 PM   #24
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Posts: 5,072
Not everyone has caught up.

Our medical providers are often reduced to the lowest common form of communication and (if not record keeping).


It is starting to change... but will take a while.

Where I see change is with larger providers.... they seem to be investing in technology. Some of the small practices will take their time (unless something forces the change).


The medical community has some pretty good practices when it comes to medicine and treatment.... But when it comes to records and communications... it is behind other industries.... it is a symptom of a highly fragmented industry with many many small players.
__________________
chinaco is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-18-2011, 03:37 PM   #25
Moderator Emeritus
Bestwifeever's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Posts: 16,373
Quote:
Originally Posted by noelm View Post
.... Americans don't like pointing out anything thats not good with the system but the fact is, its true that medical record keeping is as dated as in India (just to give an example, as I know how they are maintained there.)....
Actually, isn't this thread a good example of how Americans are the polar opposite of "not pointing out anything that's not good with the system"? I think Americans are pretty quick to point out the flaws we perceive in how things are done in our country!
__________________
“Would you like an adventure now, or would you like to have your tea first?” J.M. Barrie, Peter Pan
Bestwifeever is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-18-2011, 03:41 PM   #26
Moderator Emeritus
Nords's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2002
Location: Oahu
Posts: 26,616
Quote:
Originally Posted by TromboneAl View Post
Just hope that your betamax doctor can talk to the VHS doctor. Or your Blu-ray doctor can talk to your HD DVD doc.
__________________
*
*

The book written on E-R.org, "The Military Guide to Financial Independence and Retirement", on sale now! For more info see "About Me" in my profile.
I don't spend much time here anymore, so please send me a PM. Thanks.
Nords is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-19-2011, 01:12 PM   #27
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Posts: 1,072
"Regardless of the governments attempt to automate the industry and the billions of dollars spent so far (we spent over $50 million on one project) the lack of enforceable standards limits the usefulness of a interoperable EMR. Until a nationally accepted standard is established and adopted there is little hope that the medical community will be able to provide more than episodic treatments."

Standard what? Application, network, data semantics, physical connectors, images? All of that? I think the network stuff is fairly done; physical connectors - depends on if you are willing ot replace a ventilator because is doesn't have a USB connection; data semantics - LOINC, SNOMED or IEEE 11073? Application - EPIC or others - some work better for certain specialties or outpatient situations than others - if you have a real-time application (anesthesia charting0, you might not want a episodic approach being used as your application design feature; images - DICOM works for most, however, is you could embed the mark-up of other aspects of the clinician use of the image and report, that would be better - not all systems will accept that, so you might end up with a separate repository for the images and the report; think about the size of the storage needed to ensure all of this is available for all of the patients....

As for the Sweden comment - well, it depends, Sweden doesn't necessarily have all of their personal health record or remote monitoring information being captured in their EHR. Also, one of my bugaboos about that type of comment is a misunderstanding of how scalability can break a system that works for a fairly small population versus a much larger one. If you compared Europe to the USA, then I'd bite. And yet, Europe still doesn't have a working interoperable patient summary nor pharmacological summary that works across borders - EPSOS is a political desire, not a reality yet. In fact, Europe is even more of a patchwork in terms of what they have from country to country than what we have in our states in the USA. I did a presentation at AAMI this year about just that subject.
__________________
Deserat aka Bridget
“We sleep soundly in our beds because rough men stand ready in the night to visit violence on those who would do us harm.” - George Orwell/Winston Churchill
deserat is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-19-2011, 01:32 PM   #28
Moderator
Alan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Eee Bah Gum
Posts: 21,093
Quote:
Originally Posted by noelm View Post
.... Here in NY, they still give me paper prescription. I haven't used a paper prescription in decade (in Sweden.) All it takes is govt. willingness to streamline the system.
I worked in Louisiana until I retired to Texas in 2010. The doctors there were all electronic when it came to prescriptions (Rx's). When the Doc prescribed something he asked which pharmacy I used, typed a few things on his hand-held PDA and the prescription was ready to pick up when I arrived there.

Once I knew I was going to be on the meds for a long time, I asked the Doc to switch it to 90 day supplies and send the Rx to our mail order company, FlexScripts. Again, a few clicks on his PDA and it was done.

I moved to Texas, went to see the Doc to get a refill. I gave my details 2 weeks ahead of time so the records could be sent over, but when I went for the appointment, they weren't there so I had a full exam and when he gave me the Rx, not only was it paper, but they wouldn't fax it to FlexScripts, I had to do that myself.

No idea what it will take to drag all the medical system into the 20th century. (yes, I know we are in the 21st century now)
__________________
Retired in Jan, 2010 at 55, moved to England in May 2016
Now it's adventure before dementia
Alan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-20-2011, 11:34 AM   #29
Recycles dryer sheets
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: alberta
Posts: 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by [COLOR=black
deserat;1103024 [/COLOR]
Standard what? Application, network, data semantics, physical connectors, images? All of that? I think the network stuff is fairly done; physical connectors - depends on if you are willing ot replace a ventilator because is doesn't have a USB connection; data semantics - LOINC, SNOMED or IEEE 11073? Application - EPIC or others - some work better for certain specialties or outpatient situations than others - if you have a real-time application (anesthesia charting0,
I'm not sure why anybody would want all individual ventilator data or anesthetic charting stored on the patient's EMR for 7 years - surely this is overkill ? Who would need or even read this stuff 3 years down the line ?
you might not want a episodic approach being used as your application design feature; images - DICOM works for most, however, is you could embed the mark-up of other aspects of the clinician use of the image and report, that would be better - not all systems will accept that, so you might end up with a separate repository for the images and the report; think about the size of the storage needed to ensure all of this is available for all of the patients....
It is my understanding that memory has become significantly cheaper and surely if Google and Amazon can do it, every individual state can do it as well, provided they go with a single vendor/supplier and concentrate on the kind of stuff that are really important such as medication, test results, operative reports, hospital discharge summaries, consultation reports and emergency room visits and their reports. As for compatibility, is'nt that what standards for manufacturers are for? Dicom compatibility on diagnostic imaging seems to have been adopted by all manufacturers of imaging equipment and whilst there are still issues from one manufacturer to the next - all new imaging equipment is digital in format already.
As for the Sweden comment - well, it depends, Sweden doesn't necessarily have all of their personal health record or remote monitoring information being captured in their EHR. Also, one of my bugaboos about that type of comment is a misunderstanding of how scalability can break a system that works for a fairly small population versus a much larger one. If you compared Europe to the USA, then I'd bite. And yet, Europe still doesn't have a working interoperable patient summary nor pharmacological summary that works across borders - EPSOS is a political desire, not a reality yet. In fact, Europe is even more of a patchwork in terms of what they have from country to country than what we have in our states in the USA. I did a presentation at AAMI this year about just that subject.
I get the sense that it is a more a political than a technical problem.

I'm surprised that you haven't mentioned the biggest problem with EMR - Privacy issues - I suspect that portability is important from one state to another is important, but privacy concerns seem to trump all other issues.
__________________
Cato is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-20-2011, 11:58 AM   #30
gone traveling
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Eastern PA
Posts: 3,851
I retired from the IT field, after 40+ years. Not to impress anybody, but just to show I have a background in what I'm about to say.

Anybody who says that you can't "combine systems" due to different formats, and show a common view are full of dung.

As long as you have a "matrix" to convert to a common standard (assuming a country/world wide government standard) there is no reason that current dispersed systems cannot be used.

To suggest anything else is just foolish, IMHO.

To those providers who have a "system", it can be provided in a manner world-wide.

To those providers who are using "pen and ink", please get with the program...
__________________
rescueme is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-20-2011, 12:12 PM   #31
Full time employment: Posting here.
toofrugalformycat's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Anchorage
Posts: 731
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cato View Post
I get the sense that it is a more a political than a technical problem.

I'm surprised that you haven't mentioned the biggest problem with EMR - Privacy issues - I suspect that portability is important from one state to another is important, but privacy concerns seem to trump all other issues.
For all of us who have ever been forced to apply for private health insurance, privacy is not an issue. We have absolutely no privacy. None.
I left a good primary care doctor because her staff would not retrieve my (paper) records when I went in for a problem. The reason - I had not been in for a couple of years. They were in storage and it was too hard to find them.
This is after I phoned ahead and verified they would be available.
Electronic is the only way to go, IMHO. However, I do want a paper copy to take home with me.
__________________
toofrugalformycat is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-20-2011, 01:12 PM   #32
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
GregLee's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: Waimanalo, HI
Posts: 1,881
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cato View Post

I'm not sure why anybody would want all individual ventilator data or anesthetic charting stored on the patient's EMR for 7 years - surely this is overkill ? Who would need or even read this stuff 3 years down the line ?
...
It is my understanding that memory has become significantly cheaper ...
If memory storage is cheap, why not keep all medical data forever? That way, you don't have to decide what to discard.
__________________
Greg (retired in 2010 at age 68, state pension)
GregLee is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-20-2011, 01:35 PM   #33
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
Katsmeow's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Posts: 3,396
I've had mixed result. My primary physician has come a long way in the last couple of years. Physicians and nurse practioners work on laptops and have all the records in electronic form (well I assume it is all the records...He has looked up stuff from a few years ago, not sure how far it goes back). Prescriptions are mostly done electronically. On the other hand, I keep trying to tell them my old home phone number is no more but they still keep calling it (yes, they say it is deleted every time but it comes back)

I recently needed to take some mammogram and ultrasound results to another physician to look at (no problem as it turned out). I was given large films to take. On the other hand when I had a gall bladder ultrasound a couple of years ago at the same hospital they gave me the records on CD.

I've thought about requesting a copy of my records from various physicians but never got around to it. I've gotten copies of specific test results at time but not all the records. For those who get all the records, how does that work? Do you just get a copy of test results or do you get a copy of the written notes? Also do they charge for it? If so, how much? What do you do if it is a physician you still go to? Do you update it at each visit or what?

When I think about all the physicians I've seen in, say, the past 10 years it is a daunting task to get copies of everything. If I added in hospital visits it is even more so. Still I might do it. My knee is bothering me and some years ago I had major knee surgery. The surgeon has since retired (I know I got a letter about who would have the records but can't find it but sure I could track it down since he was in a big practice). Anyway, at one time I had a copy of some letters from him about what was wrong and what he was doing but I've lost all that (I do actually still have the video of the actual surgery although it is a VHS tape). Anyway, I was thinking it would have been helpful to have the records.
__________________
Katsmeow is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 08-20-2011, 01:54 PM   #34
Full time employment: Posting here.
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Posts: 746
It seems to be a common practice for doctors to ask for social security number and driver's license number on their new patient forms. What I don't get is why people feel the obligation to provide that information without a care in the world if it's really needed and how the information will be stored and safeguarded.
__________________
East Texas is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-21-2011, 04:57 PM   #35
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Naples
Posts: 2,161
I just had a few minutes to review this thread and couldn't get into the detail and every word spoken (sorry, written), but I get the basis of the post. I was just at my doctor's office last Thursday and this thread triggered a thought. Both of my doctor's offices have these giant rolling bookcases with thousands of files. I asked to get a prescription the doctor had written for me and to check the prior dosage. I couldn't believe the process they had to go through to find my file. Not the prescription. They had that ready. They had to roll these stacks of files around to get to "me". I'm wondering, "what would you do if there is a major fire"? Is there a backup system? Is everything on a disc somewhere? Then you think of other things. When I visit the doctor he always has this history "on paper". Why doesn't he just pull up my history on the computer? I do think we might be behind the times when it comes to records, history, files, documentation.
__________________
JOHNNIE36 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-21-2011, 06:21 PM   #36
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
Brat's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: Portland, Oregon
Posts: 5,913
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cato View Post
Complaining to the software representative is futile and somewhat dangerous - it's like telling a new mother her baby is ugly
Oh ya. My nephew is a software engineer for MS, I gave him an earful a few years back about a Windows product. That is when I learned that a softwear engineer who makes mistakes is almost discharge proof, s/he is the only one who knows where the bugs reside.
__________________
Duck bjorn.
Brat is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-21-2011, 08:00 PM   #37
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
travelover's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Posts: 9,879
Slightly off topic, but I'm curious as to the effect of merging all your medical files on your insurability with respect to pre-existing conditions , especially if the Affordable Care Act doesn't get implemented.

I can just see insurance companies looking back to see if you ever had a pimple on your butt before they cover some new malady.
__________________
Yes, I have achieved work / life balance.
travelover is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-21-2011, 08:38 PM   #38
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
Rustward's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Posts: 1,572
Maybe this is resistance to change. Or maybe it is just a business decision by the doctor.

So the doctor (who must foot the bill for this activity) will ask what's in it for me?

I can see an office switching to electronic records for new records going forward, but entering older records is going to require some manual data entry, and at best, some custom code for conversion. And it won't be cheap -- but as was mentioned in an earlier post it is certainly possible.

So, yes, I can understand a mandate at some point in the future to require a standardized data format that would work with any vendor's product, and make the data portable and interchangeable. Hey, that is how the internet works. Standardization is, for example, what allows a Cisco router to exchange routing tables with a Juniper router, and allows a little Lynksys consumer wifi access point to communicate with any other vendor's wifi product.

Entering older data into this is not going to be popular. I have been involved in some large scale data conversions (but nothing anywhere close to all the medical records in the US) and it is just not an easy task when the data comes from disparate sources. It also presents opportunities to introduce errors and omissions into a set of data, and there is a cost involved with that. Been there and done that -- on both sides.
__________________
Rustward is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-22-2011, 01:04 PM   #39
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
Rustward's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Posts: 1,572
Too late to edit my previous post, but does anybody have any security / privacy concerns about electronic records?

. . . and some people freak out when their credit card number gets stolen . . .
__________________
Rustward is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-22-2011, 02:27 PM   #40
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
TromboneAl's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Posts: 11,197
I don't worry too much about the privacy of my medical records. If someone steals my CC number, I'll have to go through a major hassle, and might lose use of my card when on a trip. If someone finds out that my shoulder was sore a few years ago, then, what?

Yes, I could think of some examples (being denied employment because you have headaches in your history), but personally, I'm not too concerned about it.
__________________

__________________
Al
TromboneAl is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Electronic Records --- Contracts and Transactions chinaco FIRE and Money 1 08-10-2011 08:14 AM
Medical Technology is great kumquat Health and Early Retirement 12 07-13-2011 05:55 AM

 

 
All times are GMT -6. The time now is 09:04 PM.
 
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.