Join Early Retirement Today
Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 06-23-2007, 02:36 PM   #21
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
mickeyd's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Location: South Texas~29N/98W
Posts: 5,884
Quote:
Most of the complaints I hear from fellow soldiers is about the waiting time for treatment, and all the red tape.
This is contrary to my experience. I can only recall once having to wait a long time for treatment. That day the clinic had a emergency when six folks were hurt at once and they called all available docs in on that one. (I think I had an hour wait). I find that the appointments are on time with very little waiting at all. No more than wait-time at a civilian doc, anyway.
__________________

__________________
Part-Owner of Texas

Outside of a dog, a book is man's best friend. Inside of a dog, it's too dark to read. Groucho Marx

In dire need of: faster horses, younger woman, older whiskey, more money.
mickeyd is offline   Reply With Quote
Join the #1 Early Retirement and Financial Independence Forum Today - It's Totally Free!

Are you planning to be financially independent as early as possible so you can live life on your own terms? Discuss successful investing strategies, asset allocation models, tax strategies and other related topics in our online forum community. Our members range from young folks just starting their journey to financial independence, military retirees and even multimillionaires. No matter where you fit in you'll find that Early-Retirement.org is a great community to join. Best of all it's totally FREE!

You are currently viewing our boards as a guest so you have limited access to our community. Please take the time to register and you will gain a lot of great new features including; the ability to participate in discussions, network with our members, see fewer ads, upload photographs, create a retirement blog, send private messages and so much, much more!

Old 06-23-2007, 09:05 PM   #22
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
OAG's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Central, Ohio, USA
Posts: 2,598
Used military health care facilities for about 25 years in Northern Virginia and mostly (20 years) at NAS Jacksonville FL. No complaints and both wife and myself received what I would characterize as extremely good care. Since 2005 (moved to central Ohio) we have been using civilian medical care and, although adequate, would like to be receiving Military Facility care instead.
__________________

__________________
Vietnam Veteran, CW4 USA, Retired 1979
OAG is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-25-2007, 10:11 PM   #23
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Posts: 2,555
I checked the Rapids site and found 3 sites listed. I called the one that is 15 miles away and they said that she could get her dependent ID card at their armory. Thanks again for the great info! You guys rock!
__________________
Dreamer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-25-2007, 11:48 PM   #24
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
Brat's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: Portland, Oregon
Posts: 5,914
My Dad worked for the COE and was assigned to an ordinance depot during WW II, when I was a toddler. We lived on base. During that assignment I got very sick and was hospitalized in an Army clinic. My Mom told me that they were the only facility with antibiotics at the time, which probably saved my life. As I was about 3 yoa all I remember was having bad dreams and falling out of bed, then getting spoiled by the hospital staff. I thought Army medical care was great.

My observations date back to the aftermath of WW II: their health programs doubtless prevented many infectious diseases from establishing a base in the US when service personnel and refugees arrived from Europe and Asia.
__________________
Duck bjorn.
Brat is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-11-2008, 10:06 PM   #25
Confused about dryer sheets
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Posts: 5
Just a quick question here Im about to be medically retired after 15yrs in the Navy. My wife and I are concerned about how or what kind of care her and the kids will receive. As far as I know and read they will all still be covered under tricare prime we just have to pay a little more. All of us have monthly meds that we pick up at our local pharmacy and they have said we are lucky to be active duty since they would be so much more expensive. Are any of you already dealing with this? Any info you could share would be great thanks.
__________________
mberg501 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-12-2008, 01:51 AM   #26
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
packrat44's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: near Canadian border and near Mexican border
Posts: 1,142
mberg501,

I am retired. DW and I are on Tricare Prime ($460/yr for family). Service has been excellent at the AF clinic we go to. When we needed medical procedures or operations, we were sent to doctors downtown. Highly recommend Tricare Prime.
__________________
Pigs get fat, hogs get slaughtered. That's my story and I am sticking to it.
packrat44 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-12-2008, 06:05 AM   #27
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
OAG's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Central, Ohio, USA
Posts: 2,598
Quote:
Originally Posted by mberg501 View Post
Just a quick question here I’m about to be medically retired after 15yrs in the Navy. My wife and I are concerned about how or what kind of care her and the kids will receive. As far as I know and read they will all still be covered under tricare prime we just have to pay a little more. All of us have monthly meds that we pick up at our local pharmacy and they have said we are lucky to be active duty since they would be so much more expensive. Are any of you already dealing with this? Any info you could share would be great thanks.
If you are retired and remain in the same area you should still be able to get your medications at the same place. If you move near another Military Treatment Facility the same thing should apply. Short of that (the one we use now) you can get them from Express Scripts, Pharmacy Benefit Management (PBM), Order Prescriptions, Workers' Compensation. They are not free but they are inexpensive (example: my HBP medication cost me $3 for a 90 day supply).

As far as Tricare Prime on the outside (if you cannot get treatment at a MTF) you would have to find a local facility that accepts TRICARE (it was no problem for us). Depending on where you are going to be living you should be able to find referrals pretty easily through VFW, American Legion, and other Internet Forums.

Good luck and I hope all works out well for you and your family.
__________________
Vietnam Veteran, CW4 USA, Retired 1979
OAG is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-12-2008, 08:37 AM   #28
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Posts: 1,322
Quote:
Originally Posted by R Wood View Post
As far as Tricare Prime on the outside (if you cannot get treatment at a MTF) you would have to find a local facility that accepts TRICARE (it was no problem for us). Depending on where you are going to be living you should be able to find referrals pretty easily through VFW, American Legion, and other Internet Forums.
This is a little tricky. I've been both Prime and standard, and am currently Prime in the greater DC area (VA, MD, DC). Because I'm Prime, I must use a MTF unless I get a nonavailability certificate, which only happens if I can't be seen within 30 days (for nonemergency) or I need a specialist that they don't have, which is pretty rare for the DC area. Bottom line, oftentimes I have to wait nearly 30 days to see anyone other than a GP, and drive 40 miles and sometimes 2+ hours to get to Walter Reed. So I'm thinking of switching to standard, at somewhat higher cost, to get faster and closer service. However, in our area many specialists don't accept standard, so it's not an easy choice to make. Maybe this is just a DC thing, I don't know.
__________________
FinallyRetired is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-12-2008, 08:41 AM   #29
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
OAG's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Central, Ohio, USA
Posts: 2,598
Quote:
Originally Posted by SoonToRetire View Post
This is a little tricky. I've been both Prime and standard, and am currently Prime in the greater DC area (VA, MD, DC). Because I'm Prime, I must use a MTF unless I get a nonavailability certificate, which only happens if I can't be seen within 30 days (for nonemergency) or I need a specialist that they don't have, which is pretty rare for the DC area. Bottom line, oftentimes I have to wait nearly 30 days to see anyone other than a GP, and drive 40 miles and sometimes 2+ hours to get to Walter Reed. So I'm thinking of switching to standard, at somewhat higher cost, to get faster and closer service. However, in our area many specialists don't accept standard, so it's not an easy choice to make. Maybe this is just a DC thing, I don't know.
I should have pointed out we are using TFL (Tricare for Live) in conjunction with MEDICARE maybe that makes it easier for the Dr to take us. When I was on Tricare (prior to age 65) I always used TRICARE Prime.
__________________
Vietnam Veteran, CW4 USA, Retired 1979
OAG is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-12-2008, 08:58 AM   #30
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Posts: 1,322
Quote:
Originally Posted by R Wood View Post
I should have pointed out we are using TFL (Tricare for Live) in conjunction with MEDICARE maybe that makes it easier for the Dr to take us. When I was on Tricare (prior to age 65) I always used TRICARE Prime.
Oh, OK, that makes a big difference. TFL is basically Medicare with Tricare as a secondary. I've noticed some specialists in my area take TFL only, no Prime or standard. When you were Prime, did you experience the delays and distance issues I mentioned? As I said, this may be mainly a DC problem because of the number of retirees compared with the limited MTFs and their need to care for those wounded in Iraq.
__________________
FinallyRetired is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-12-2008, 09:46 AM   #31
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
OAG's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Central, Ohio, USA
Posts: 2,598
Quote:
Originally Posted by SoonToRetire View Post
Oh, OK, that makes a big difference. TFL is basically Medicare with Tricare as a secondary. I've noticed some specialists in my area take TFL only, no Prime or standard. When you were Prime, did you experience the delays and distance issues I mentioned? As I said, this may be mainly a DC problem because of the number of retirees compared with the limited MTFs and their need to care for those wounded in Iraq.
This must be unique to DC area. I experienced no problems where I was at in FL (very close to NAS Jacksonville). IMO we got very good and timely care (I got next day appointments when I called in on a Sunday). In one case I got same day care for what I thought was minor problem and could have waited. Referrals were pretty easy to attain in the couple in the instances they could not treat the problem or felt they had done all they could (unknown skin problem and a foot problem). However, at the time I was going to go on MEDICARE I did get a letter that said I may have to find outside routine care because is was going on MC and TFL. We moved before I actually went on MC/TFL so I don't know if we would have had a problem finding care in FL (I really doubt it would have been a problem).
__________________
Vietnam Veteran, CW4 USA, Retired 1979
OAG is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-12-2008, 11:12 AM   #32
Confused about dryer sheets
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Posts: 5
man thanks a bunch as im sure you all know it has been brutal the last month finding out that for sure i will be retired. ive have been pretty successful so far holding it all together but its unraviling for sure. we should be moving to houston tx as we have friends and family there and a good possibility for jobs as Im an IT with lots of network security and such under my belt. thanks again for all of your help out there
__________________
mberg501 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-12-2008, 04:18 PM   #33
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
mickeyd's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Location: South Texas~29N/98W
Posts: 5,884
Quote:
Originally Posted by mberg501 View Post
Are any of you already dealing with this? Any info you could share would be great thanks.
I'm retired with Tricare Prime (TP) with DW. If receive my care at a local Army medical clinic and receive all meds at no cost. I could opt to get meds via mail, but there is a copay to deal with if you receive meds in the mail. I am a big fan of TP and have no complaints at all, nor does DW.

I suggest that you get all of your Tricare Qs together and visit the local Tricare office to get them answered. They are very helpful.
__________________
Part-Owner of Texas

Outside of a dog, a book is man's best friend. Inside of a dog, it's too dark to read. Groucho Marx

In dire need of: faster horses, younger woman, older whiskey, more money.
mickeyd is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-12-2008, 09:06 PM   #34
Moderator Emeritus
Nords's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2002
Location: Oahu
Posts: 26,620
Quote:
Originally Posted by mberg501 View Post
man thanks a bunch as im sure you all know it has been brutal the last month finding out that for sure i will be retired. ive have been pretty successful so far holding it all together but its unraviling for sure. we should be moving to houston tx as we have friends and family there and a good possibility for jobs as Im an IT with lots of network security and such under my belt. thanks again for all of your help out there
Well, MBerg, I'm sorry the military chose not to work with you. Considerign today's retention numbers and their investment to get you to this point, it seems kinda shortsighted.

It'll be interesting to see how your health changes once you're clear of your current hassles & stressors.

A couple suggestions:

We've found Tricare to be a great way to experience life outside the military clinic. I much prefer a physician/resident's clinic 10 minutes away from the house to going up to Schofield Barracks (20 minutes) or down to Pearl Harbor (25 minutes). The clinic doctors are a lot more interested in a pony-tailed surfer dude than a military doctor (or contractor) would be, and they tend to have more experience in after-the-military medicine like your condition. The residents in particular are enthusiastic, cheerfully willing to admit ignorance, and extremely persistent in their follow-through. Civilian clinic appointments have also been much easier/more convenient than the military system. I've had better civilian care in six years than I got from the military in 24.

While meds are free at the military clinics, my time is still worth money to me. I'd much rather pay $3-$12 at Long's Drugs (and get my shopping done) than be "Priority C" at the active-duty clinic pharmacy. It avoids the bureaucracy, the base security issues, and the nagging feeling that I'm wasting the time of an active-duty guy who needs to get back to work.

Even in Houston you might want to check in to the Tricare mail-order pharmacy. I don't use it (no maintenance meds) but DoD really pushes it hard as a money-saving measure (for DoD) and using it may make it easier to get what you want.

You might also want to contact BigMoneyJim about the IT market in Houston. He's not very close to there but he's very knowledgable. You might also want to check in with REWahoo! to update your list of Texas' lethal hazards. There've been a few innovations during your absence...

And finally, you might want to contact Lucas Group to see if they still have their enlisted technician head-hunter's branch. They were quite successful with that a few years ago and they'd be more than happy to have a company pay them to hire you. They do a good job of translating your skills and helping you crack the civilian code. If you get to talk to Dave Mauerman, a submariner shipmate, tell him I said "Hey".
__________________
*
*

The book written on E-R.org, "The Military Guide to Financial Independence and Retirement", on sale now! For more info see "About Me" in my profile.
I don't spend much time here anymore, so please send me a PM. Thanks.
Nords is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-14-2008, 03:23 AM   #35
Recycles dryer sheets
oma's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Tampa/St Petersburg, FLA
Posts: 314
Quote:
Originally Posted by mickeyd View Post
After being treated by civilian Docs for about 20 years, I returned to military medicine almost 3 years ago.

I can say with no hesitancy that the medical care that I have received in that time from on-base military (Tricare) medicine has been superb. They have ferreted out several medical issues that my civilian doc never even checked on. I feel that my treatment has added many years to my life.

I had a Q today about the results of a recent lab test and called the clinic for further clarification. I was on the phone for 15-20 minutes with the nurse who thoroughly responded to every question that I had in great detail. Can not ask for more than that.

My wife (recently retired) is also just getting on the same program and has had no negative comments, but time will tell.

Its nice to read about good military health care. I've been in the Army for 20 yrs and have nothing more than a sore throat, thankfully, so I haven't been on the receiving end, much. But as a provider, let me tell you, we are facing so much bureaucracy that takes away from our ability to care for patients. Also, you probably wouldn't be surprised about how many patients enter the health care system not needing to see an MD - taking time away patients that do. Free health care does that.
__________________
oma is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-19-2008, 02:47 PM   #36
Recycles dryer sheets
Average Joe's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Posts: 93
Retired a few months now have Tricare Prime. So far so good for wife, kids, and me. We were dissatisfied with the first pediatrician we selected from the list, but swapping for another was no problem. Ive seen my civilian doctor once and was happy with the visit - he seemed to listen more and hurry less than military doctors have in my recent experience.

There are some great people in serving as primary care Doctors, PAs, Nurses, Techs, and other support staff in the military system. But my experience over the last few years gives me the impression of a trend to squeeze more and more medical care out of fewer and fewer human resources in the area of primary care to the detriment of doctors and patients. Maybe it was specific to where I was. The primary care clinic at my last assignment smelled like stress. Physicians, and PAs seemed especially harried to me. Is someone applying fast-food restaurant management principles to medicine?

Military surgeons have repaired me using the best techniques available and with good results. And convalescent leave when needed, was granted without question, without cost to me, and without hard feeling or repercussions.
__________________
Average Joe is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-19-2008, 03:42 PM   #37
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
packrat44's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: near Canadian border and near Mexican border
Posts: 1,142
Quote:
Originally Posted by oma View Post
But as a provider, let me tell you, we are facing so much bureaucracy that takes away from our ability to care for patients.

Same on the civilian side.

Also, you probably wouldn't be surprised about how many patients enter the health care system not needing to see an MD - taking time away patients that do. Free health care does that.
In the civilian world the most rude and demanding of patients are those who are on welfare.



Quote:
Originally Posted by Average Joe View Post
But my experience over the last few years gives me the impression of a trend to squeeze more and more medical care out of fewer and fewer human resources in the area of primary care to the detriment of doctors and patients. Maybe it was specific to where I was. The primary care clinic at my last assignment smelled like stress. Physicians, and PAs seemed especially harried to me. Is someone applying fast-food restaurant management principles to medicine?
Same in the civilian world. The CEOs "need" their mega-bucks at the expense of the health workers and patients.
__________________
Pigs get fat, hogs get slaughtered. That's my story and I am sticking to it.
packrat44 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-20-2008, 12:19 AM   #38
Recycles dryer sheets
oma's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Tampa/St Petersburg, FLA
Posts: 314
Quote:
Originally Posted by Average Joe View Post
Retired a few months now have Tricare Prime. So far so good for wife, kids, and me. We were dissatisfied with the first pediatrician we selected from the list, but swapping for another was no problem. Ive seen my civilian doctor once and was happy with the visit - he seemed to listen more and hurry less than military doctors have in my recent experience.

There are some great people in serving as primary care Doctors, PAs, Nurses, Techs, and other support staff in the military system. But my experience over the last few years gives me the impression of a trend to squeeze more and more medical care out of fewer and fewer human resources in the area of primary care to the detriment of doctors and patients. Maybe it was specific to where I was. The primary care clinic at my last assignment smelled like stress. Physicians, and PAs seemed especially harried to me. Is someone applying fast-food restaurant management principles to medicine?

Military surgeons have repaired me using the best techniques available and with good results. And convalescent leave when needed, was granted without question, without cost to me, and without hard feeling or repercussions.

You hit the nail on the head. I've worked in the various medical settings over the last 20 yrs, and now I'm in charge of a primary care clinic. We're strapped for physician/physician assistant staff. Two of our staff are deployed to Iraq - making access to care very poor, imo. Definitely no fun going to work every day. The stress that you describe for the providers is definitely there. A harried work environment is exactly how things feel at work. Of course, the patients should never feel our stress, but it is difficult.
__________________

__________________
oma is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Is Univeral Health Care the answer????? janeeyre Health and Early Retirement 197 05-06-2007 05:09 PM
health insurance and effect on increased health care costs Martha Other topics 9 08-08-2006 02:54 PM
The book, The New Health Insurance Solution Martha FIRE and Money 20 05-15-2006 11:16 AM
The Cost of Retiring Healthy retire@40 FIRE and Money 37 03-26-2006 07:26 AM

 

 
All times are GMT -6. The time now is 05:51 AM.
 
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.