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non-profit nursing homes provide better care
Old 10-29-2008, 06:50 PM   #1
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non-profit nursing homes provide better care

I ran across this article and was rather stunned by the fact that non-profits provide better care than for-profits.

ConsumerReports.org - Nursing home guide

From the article:

"Not-for-profit nursing homes are more likely to provide good care than for-profits, based on our analysis of inspection surveys, staffing, and quality indicators. The same analysis shows that independently run homes are more likely to provide good care than chains."


You would think if you saved a lot of money for the possibility of needing long-term-care, that you'd be better off going to a home that charged more. (I assume the for-profits cost more, but I guess one can't be sure of that - maybe that's not true?) Anyways, it really gave me a new insight into how to evaluate nursing homes for myself/loved ones when/if needed in the future.
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Old 10-29-2008, 09:53 PM   #2
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Not sure why this is stunning.. the profit motive is a powerful force that will encourage managers to cut corners where possible. I'd imagine something as "minor" as a nurse having 10 or 20 minutes more per patient per day could make a difference, all else being equal.
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Old 10-29-2008, 10:23 PM   #3
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These studies have some bias as the non-profits often aren't audited as frequently as profit facilities. If you are looking for a long term care situation make sure to consider the patient population and review the last inspection carefully, some gigs are more important than others.
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Old 10-30-2008, 09:34 AM   #4
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Don't confuse "non-profit" with charity. "Non-profit" is just a business structure. They can pay the executives and all their staff a salary, just like a for-profit company . They pretty much have the same reasons to "cut corners" as do the "for-profit" structures. If they don't keep their prices in line, they don't get business, they cease to exist, and the CEOs stop making money.

Underwriters Laboratories is organized as an NPO.

IIRC, an NPO is also not necessarily tax-exempt.


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Old 10-30-2008, 11:15 AM   #5
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Always look at governance. I am interested in moving to a non-profit continuing care retirement community eventually and in my research have noticed differences in the representation of residents on the boards of directors.

Having dealt with this matter for both of my parents I learned that few do research on facilities in advance of need. Medicare has a good website but it provides info only on skilled nursing facilities that accept Medicare. Also, care provided in a facility is driven by the facility administrator, a change in administrators often results in a change in the level of care provided residents.
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Nursing Homes/ Assisted Living are big challenge
Old 10-31-2008, 12:45 PM   #6
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Nursing Homes/ Assisted Living are big challenge

Over the last five years I have handled the affairs of my parents and my spouse's parents through decline, assisted living, and death. This was in the California. At the facilities we used, generally the best available, well researched, etc., the staff was 100% foreign, with little English, and had high turnover. Even with our own privately paid care manager in the facility every week, and our own visits, care was not what you would like to see. Some staff were great, but very over-worked. Others didn't care.

Generally, nursing homes are for people with medical issues, such as IV's, feeding tubes, injections and the like. They are such terrible places that you want your relative to be in Assisted Living rather than a nursing home if at all possible. The cost of nursing home is 50% more than Assisted Living. And, people want to stay on their own in their own home as long as possible. This means that when they do get to the assisted living facility, they are more needful of help than the minimum staffing level of these facilities as required by the state, can provide. You have to fight management all the time to get the care they promise to provide.

Non-profits are better, but they too have complaints when you check with the state. Our Care Manager (Professional RN/MSW) said there were problems at all facilities.
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Old 10-31-2008, 01:01 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SteveL View Post
Generally, nursing homes are for people with medical issues, such as IV's, feeding tubes, injections and the like. They are such terrible places that you want your relative to be in Assisted Living rather than a nursing home if at all possible. The cost of nursing home is 50% more than Assisted Living. And, people want to stay on their own in their own home as long as possible. This means that when they do get to the assisted living facility, they are more needful of help than the minimum staffing level of these facilities as required by the state, can provide. You have to fight management all the time to get the care they promise to provide.

Non-profits are better, but they too have complaints when you check with the state. Our Care Manager (Professional RN/MSW) said there were problems at all facilities.
I agree, there are problems at all facilities. I actually work in a nursing home, and I guess this makes me think a lot about what might happen to us someday. We have no children. We do have nieces and nephews, but I wouldn't count on them to be there as much as they would need to to be real advocates for us. I've seen how important it is to have family members around.

Several of our residents have feeding tubes, but I would not say they are in the majority. Very few have IV's. Many have just declined physically and/or mentally to the point where they require more care than can be provided in an assisted living setting. It's a reality that I know does happen - not to everyone - but it's something to plan for and think about.
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