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Old 10-13-2010, 11:48 AM   #21
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You earned your forum name well. Nice going.

I took a different path as I aged (now 61), though I never came close to running a marathon. After a series of musculoskeletal annoyances I decided I needed to stop pushing myself before I do some real damage. I bought a heart rate monitor and started to run to achieve a target heart rate (85% predicted max) for an alloted period of time (45-60 min). Definitely, this is not competitive running, just enjoyment and fitness (AKA senior exercise).

This works well especially in extremely warm climates. Sometimes I get to my target rate with little more than a half-walk (July, sunny, hot, humid) and sometimes I am in a true "jog." I learned that shade makes a big difference. I've pretty much given up sprinting and intervals.

Anyway, congratulations on your running triumphs.
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Old 10-13-2010, 12:21 PM   #22
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Congrats Runningbum! 3:19 is quite an accomplishment at any age. Keep up the good work.

I dont run marathons anymore due to "musculoskeletal annoyances" (as mentioned by doc above), but I still hike and bike quit a bit. But I cant seem to get back into the shape I was in during my marathon days.
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Old 10-13-2010, 03:43 PM   #23
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... so I decided to take another shot at a serious marathon training program.
I lost the weight I had gained back, and kept losing until last week I actually got down to the weight I remember being when I went out for football my junior year of high school. That was during a 3-day very low carb diet getting ready to carb load before a race this past weekend, so 3 pounds came back on, but it was still a kick to get down to that weight even if just for a day or two.
I won't bore you with the details of my running program, but it was a lot of miles including some fast ones. And I stretched and did core exercise almost every day.
I think a lot of credit is due to the maturity (the mental/emotional kind, not the chronological aspect) and the experience that comes with age. By the time people get to this point, they've either given up completely-- or else their setbacks have shown them how to realistically reach their goals and they have the mental toughness to make it happen.

I'm the slowest taekwondo fighter in my dojang, and I'm not as powerful as many. But I've learned to tolerate an impressive amount of pain/impact, I don't get upset/angry, and I am by far the sneakiest. You can't even develop those skills in the 20-somethings, let alone the teens.
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Old 10-13-2010, 05:15 PM   #24
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Can you substitute bike riding to running?
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Old 10-13-2010, 06:01 PM   #25
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I've pretty much given up sprinting and intervals.
Recently I've made the following discovery: If I include an all-out sprint, or hard hill climb on the bike, even if it is for only 30 seconds or so, it seems to make me feel better later in the day. If I started my run feeling kind of tired, this seems to rejuvenate me. If I don't include a sprint, I might be just as tired later in the day as before running.

I first noticed this after surfing, which often includes mandatory all-out efforts (to avoid being squashed by a wave). I'd be surprised to find that I was less tired after surfing than before (or perhaps tired but feeling good).

Anyone else notice this? Is it my imagination?
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Old 10-13-2010, 06:19 PM   #26
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3:19
It is truly hard to believe that a human can run 26 something miles in that little time (and live). I think that is my time for a 5k.

Congrats Running Bum. Your accomplishment is inspirational.

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Old 10-13-2010, 07:08 PM   #27
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Well done runningbum.
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Old 10-13-2010, 07:38 PM   #28
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Recently I've made the following discovery: If I include an all-out sprint, or hard hill climb on the bike, even if it is for only 30 seconds or so, it seems to make me feel better later in the day. If I started my run feeling kind of tired, this seems to rejuvenate me. If I don't include a sprint, I might be just as tired later in the day as before running.

I first noticed this after surfing, which often includes mandatory all-out efforts (to avoid being squashed by a wave). I'd be surprised to find that I was less tired after surfing than before (or perhaps tired but feeling good).

Anyone else notice this? Is it my imagination?
I do feel better if I add at some intervals to my workout, but I haven't been nearly as rigorous about it. I delighted to learn about your results. Just one interval has major benefits - wow! Now I'm going to be more rigorous about this 'cause you can always talk yourself into one!

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Old 10-13-2010, 07:59 PM   #29
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Anyone else notice this? Is it my imagination?
There's probably a complicated explanation involving fast-twitch and slow-twitch muscle fibers.

But I think it's the huge shot of adrenaline released into the bloodstream...
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Old 10-13-2010, 08:20 PM   #30
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Recently I've made the following discovery: If I include an all-out sprint, or hard hill climb on the bike, even if it is for only 30 seconds or so, it seems to make me feel better later in the day. If I started my run feeling kind of tired, this seems to rejuvenate me. If I don't include a sprint, I might be just as tired later in the day as before running.

I first noticed this after surfing, which often includes mandatory all-out efforts (to avoid being squashed by a wave). I'd be surprised to find that I was less tired after surfing than before (or perhaps tired but feeling good).

Anyone else notice this? Is it my imagination?
Hmm, most of my speed work was longer, like intervals of 600 meters to a mile, so after even a couple of these you are pretty tired.

But there were some 100 meter "strides", which are full speed runs but not cops-chasing-you effort, intended to improve running form. The plan called for 6 to 10 of them, with enough break in between to fully recover, since it was for form and not part of endurance. I guess I did feel pretty good after those. I'm not sure what the physical reasons would be. Rush of adrenaline?
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Old 10-13-2010, 08:50 PM   #31
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I remember being in my 30s and coming to the (false) realization that I was getting old and would never accomplish one of my life ambitions to run a marathon. A few years later I got inspired, shed some weight, and ran my first marathon at 39, in a respectable time.

Getting into my mid 40s, I kept running marathons and ultras but gradually got a big slower, sometimes had to run with pain, and my weight drifted back up. I resigned myself to the (again, false) fact that I would never run a marathon as fast as my first.

This summer I had more time on my hands since my kid is in college and I cut work to 1/2 time, so I decided to take another shot at a serious marathon training program.

I lost the weight I had gained back, and kept losing until last week I actually got down to the weight I remember being when I went out for football my junior year of high school. That was during a 3-day very low carb diet getting ready to carb load before a race this past weekend, so 3 pounds came back on, but it was still a kick to get down to that weight even if just for a day or two.

I won't bore you with the details of my running program, but it was a lot of miles including some fast ones. And I stretched and did core exercise almost every day.

My goal marathon was Sunday, the Steamtown marathon from Forest City to Scranton, PA. My goal was 3:30, to qualify to run Boston next year. That's 11 minutes better than my best time. But from my training and times in shorter races this year, I thought I could do even better, so I went out at a faster pace. I finished in 3:19.

It's probably a silly thing to see how fast you can run when you're a month from turning 49, but I got a lot of satisfaction from setting a goal, working very hard at it, and exceeding the goal.

I think it also shows that you CAN turn back the clock and get yourself back in better shape even if you've slipped some. Take it one step at a time but keep at it. I'm in the best shape of my life, or at least since I competed in high school sports.


yeah baby!

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Old 10-14-2010, 01:55 AM   #32
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Recently I've made the following discovery: If I include an all-out sprint, or hard hill climb on the bike, even if it is for only 30 seconds or so, it seems to make me feel better later in the day. If I started my run feeling kind of tired, this seems to rejuvenate me. If I don't include a sprint, I might be just as tired later in the day as before running.

I first noticed this after surfing, which often includes mandatory all-out efforts (to avoid being squashed by a wave). I'd be surprised to find that I was less tired after surfing than before (or perhaps tired but feeling good).

Anyone else notice this? Is it my imagination?
There's some data that suggests that interval training can increase HGH production. Maybe one is enough to see an effect? I posted a thread on it a couple of years ago:

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Old 10-16-2010, 09:42 AM   #33
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This post gave me some hope...thanks!
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Old 10-16-2010, 01:11 PM   #34
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I started a half marathon training program 5 weeks ago as a way to stay motivated with my workouts.

After 5 weeks I can see an improvement in my fitness, however even though I am the same age as the OP, I doubt if I will ever be able to run a half marathon in the time he did a marathon. I think one of the biggest struggles with long distance running is the mental aspect. I find after about 10 minutes I think what is the point of what I am doing.

I am also thinking of doing the half marathon in HOnolulu next June, I figure if I dangle a carrot of a trip to a nice location in front of my nose, hopefully it will encourage me to see this one thru. I've always fantasised about doing the Hawaii Ironman or running the Boston Marathon, but 5 minutes later I am back flopping on the couch.
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Old 10-16-2010, 01:39 PM   #35
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Congratulations. You should feel proud of your accomplishments. You didn't say exactly how much weight you lost. You must have been in fairly decent shape to begin with. I find running tough on the joints and back. Biking and walking are easier on the body, less wear and tear.
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Old 10-16-2010, 05:20 PM   #36
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Good luck Danger Mouse. There's (almost) always someone faster than you, and someone slower. Run for yourself.

I went from about 181 in May when I ran my previous marathon to as low as 160, but I think I was about 162 race morning. I was definitely in good enough shape to run marathons before, but losing the weight help the speed a lot and took a lot of stress off my joints and kept me from breaking down in the 2nd half of the race.
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Old 10-16-2010, 05:39 PM   #37
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I find running tough on the joints and back. Biking and walking are easier on the body, less wear and tear.
This year DW and I have been doing "water running" and the trainer runs the classes using interval training techniques. It's a great way to get your heart rate up without impacting the joints at all and we often have runners join the class for few weeks who have achilles tendon or other injuries or surgeries and need to maintain their fitness levels.


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You will not be able to achieve as high a heart rate running in the water as running on land. A study from the famed Karolinska Institute in Stockholm found that heart rate is 8-11 beats per minute lower for the same oxygen uptake when running in the water compared to normal running. This study also found maximal heart rate on average to be 16 beats per minute lower during all-out water running compared to land running. Lower heart rates during water running are primarily due to the pressure of water on the body which makes more blood return to the heart so more blood is pumped with each heart beat. A useful rule of thumb is that heart rates during water running are about 10% lower than during land running. If you get your heart rate up to 140 beats per minute in the water, that is roughly equal to 154 beats per minute during normal running. The temperature of the water affects your heart rate during deep water running. Your heart rate will be lower in cool water and higher in warm water. In addition, two studies have found that women have slightly lower heart rates and oxygen consumption than men during deep water running. This is thought to be due to women’s generally higher bodyfat content and resultant greater buoyancy than men.
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Old 10-17-2010, 12:07 AM   #38
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RB congratulations on the 3:19 I don't expect one of those anytime soon.

Quote:
Originally Posted by TromboneAl View Post
Recently I've made the following discovery: If I include an all-out sprint, or hard hill climb on the bike, even if it is for only 30 seconds or so, it seems to make me feel better later in the day. If I started my run feeling kind of tired, this seems to rejuvenate me. If I don't include a sprint, I might be just as tired later in the day as before running.
I first noticed this after surfing, which often includes mandatory all-out efforts (to avoid being squashed by a wave). I'd be surprised to find that I was less tired after surfing than before (or perhaps tired but feeling good).
Anyone else notice this? Is it my imagination?
Al, similar here need some sprints/interval training to really feel right and have my best energy that day AND the next. I really stepped up the running last year and have seen a dramatic difference. Some weight lifting and fast twitch development might be the fountain of youth.
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Old 10-21-2010, 09:06 AM   #39
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After reading this thread and mb's post, I added more sprints, and my thigh muscles got pretty sore. That shows that those muscles were getting a workout that they hadn't gotten before.
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Old 10-21-2010, 09:07 AM   #40
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You guys got me lusting after that Concept 2 rower again!

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