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Please Pass The Creamed Aparagus
Old 10-16-2009, 02:04 PM   #1
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Please Pass The Creamed Aparagus

http://www.mdpi.com/1660-4601/6/10/2626/pdf

Oh boy, have the public health killjoys ever put one over on us over the past 50 years!

I think I'll have some nice fresh raspberries with crème fraiche to celebrate.

Ha
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Old 10-16-2009, 02:20 PM   #2
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I knew it!
DW is trying to kill me with the low fat - no fat crap. Low fat cream cheese is the worst.

Good article Ha Ha. Interesting that they saw no benefit from fish.

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Old 10-16-2009, 02:26 PM   #3
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I knew it!
DW is trying to kill me with the low fat - no fat crap. Low fat cream cheese is the worst.

Good article Ha Ha. Interesting that they saw no benefit from fish.

Free to canoe
I bet fish would be heart protective if taken as creamed finnan haddie, or maybe smoked herring in sour cream with a garnish of chilled cumcumber?

Ha
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Old 10-16-2009, 02:50 PM   #4
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I bet fish would be heart protective if taken as creamed finnan haddie, or maybe smoked herring in sour cream with a garnish of chilled cumcumber?
With chocolate on top... and a cherry.
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Old 10-16-2009, 02:51 PM   #5
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With chocolate on top... and a cherry.
Anything is better with a cherry.
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Old 10-16-2009, 04:12 PM   #6
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When I was little, milk was not homogenized and the cream floated on the top. We would pour off the cream into a little pitcher before drinking our milk. The cream in the pitcher went into our parents' coffee, or on fruit or into the refrigerator to use later in recipes.

I haven't had cream in so many years that I doubt I would recognize it. Seems luscious, rich, decadent, and dreamy..
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Old 10-16-2009, 04:20 PM   #7
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Best to eat real food in moderation. I never look at the fat or salt content of anything. If I want it, and it is available, I eat it. Fortunately, I don't have any medical conditions that demand a restrictive diet, and my tastes tend to be healthy overall. I eat a lot of fresh veggies and fruits and whole grains. My downfall is premium cheeses and chewy fresh breads. Homemade minestrone tonight for me. Might grate some Parmesan on top.
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Old 10-16-2009, 04:24 PM   #8
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A very interesting study. Thanks!

They even compared people who consume unpasteurized milk with pasteurized milk (result: no significant difference). Very thorough. I just regret that they didn't mention how people who didn't consume any dairy products whatsoever fared. Maybe there weren't enough of those in their sample.
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Old 10-16-2009, 04:42 PM   #9
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A very interesting study. Thanks!

I just regret that they didn't mention how people who didn't consume any dairy products whatsoever fared. Maybe there weren't enough of those in their sample.
Likely true. I lived for many years in a Scandinavian-American farming community. We bought milk in a gallon jar, straight form the farmer's Jersey cows. These people live on dairy. Still, if the low dairy fat group had outcomes clearly worse than the medium and high fat goups, what additional information would you be looking for in a no dairy fat group? I wonder if any significant number of these people would exist even in the USA?

Ha
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Old 10-16-2009, 07:15 PM   #10
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I haven't had cream in so many years that I doubt I would recognize it. Seems luscious, rich, decadent, and dreamy..
It most certainly is. If you have the patience, make créme fraîche. If not, purchase Crema Mexicana at Wal Mart. Heaven is just a taste away.

Cook's Thesaurus: Cultured Milk Products
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Old 10-16-2009, 07:17 PM   #11
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It most certainly is. If you have the patience, make créme fraîche. If not, purchase Crema Mexicana at Wal Mart. Heaven is just a taste away.
Crema Mexicana - now you're talking! If you're in Texas, the HEB store version is the best.

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Old 10-16-2009, 08:29 PM   #12
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When I was little, milk was not homogenized and the cream floated on the top. We would pour off the cream into a little pitcher before drinking our milk. The cream in the pitcher went into our parents' coffee, or on fruit or into the refrigerator to use later in recipes.

I haven't had cream in so many years that I doubt I would recognize it. Seems luscious, rich, decadent, and dreamy..
Oh, that brings back memories!

Strawberries and cream......
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Old 10-16-2009, 08:34 PM   #13
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Likely true. I lived for many years in a Scandinavian-American farming community. We bought milk in a gallon jar, straight form the farmer's Jersey cows. These people live on dairy. Still, if the low dairy fat group had outcomes clearly worse than the medium and high fat goups, what additional information would you be looking for in a no dairy fat group? I wonder if any significant number of these people would exist even in the USA?

Ha
I grew up on and around small farms. Jersey cows, milk not homogenized, not pasteurized; I miss the stuff.
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Old 10-16-2009, 08:36 PM   #14
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It most certainly is. If you have the patience, make créme fraîche. If not, purchase Crema Mexicana at Wal Mart. Heaven is just a taste away.

Cook's Thesaurus: Cultured Milk Products
I love Cook's magazine! I buy old issues for ten cents each at the public library. I don't care how old they are as they are timeless and reliable.
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Old 10-17-2009, 05:00 PM   #15
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These people live on dairy. Still, if the low dairy fat group had outcomes clearly worse than the medium and high fat goups, what additional information would you be looking for in a no dairy fat group?
Well I've always been wondering if milk was healthy or not.

I suppose it probably is good, and the general public and most doctors think so.

But there are dissenting opinions out there. My family doctor advises against milk for adults. And professor Keith Woodford is convinced certain "newer" and very prominent cow races like Holstein-Friesian have a mutation that promotes diseases like heart disease and diabetes. (he's defends his theory in a book, citing from over 100 scientific studies - I haven't read it)

I have no idea who is right, but I certainly would like to know.
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Old 10-17-2009, 05:55 PM   #16
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I think people of Indoeuropean descent have adapted to milk in their diet as they developed a mutation that allowed digestion of milk in adulthood. This adaptation spread throughout the European population. That tells me that there was some strong long-term survivor benefit to milk in the diet for this genetic mutation to become so dominant. If you look at caucasian cultures - there are many that have heavily used milk - cow or other hoofed animal for millennia.

So, IMO, milk is perfectly healthy for most adults of these heritages (assuming they are lactose tolerant), but perhaps not for other races. I just don't think whether milk is "healthy" for adults can be universally applied as we are not all the same genetically.

Having said that, I still stick to the low-fat forms of milk/yogurt etc. ( I buy only organic to avoid growth hormones). I prefer to get my fat from olive oil, etc.

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Old 10-17-2009, 06:03 PM   #17
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A lactose-tolerant mutation (Dif. from indo-european afaik) also shows up in some of the cattle-herding cultures of Africa. Most of the world doesn't have one.

We eat what there is to eat - I suspect there are not many ethnic Irish allergic to potatoes or milk - they all died off!

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Old 10-17-2009, 07:18 PM   #18
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I use organic milk on cereal but like many here get most of my dairy from yogurt, cottage cheese, cheese, all of which I believe are digested differently from milk(enzymes?). I have no problems with lactose intolerance and have no food allergies. I think if something does not agree with you, avoid it.
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Old 10-17-2009, 09:11 PM   #19
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I think people of Indoeuropean descent have adapted to milk in their diet as they developed a mutation that allowed digestion of milk in adulthood. This adaptation spread throughout the European population. That tells me that there was some strong long-term survivor benefit to milk in the diet for this genetic mutation to become so dominant.
True, but the main killer of humans throughout history has been starvation, and our genes are adapted most to help us beat famine (that's why it's so hard to lose weight!). Natural selection will, over time, select for traits that lead to the highest number of offspring that later reproduce (to pass on the trait). It doesn't do anything to select for longevity. To the tribe, a 40 year old was a rarity, and a consumer of scarce resources. Likewise, a gene that allows an individual to digest milk from herd animals and thereby live to have and raise several children is a big win, it doesn't matter that the arteries clog up afterward.

Lots of books and diets tell us that we are "meant" to eat this or that thing, our bodies have adapted for that over millions of years, yada, yada. Yes--but our ancestors ate those things and lived to be 35 years old, maybe 50. If we want to live longer (which is not "natural") then we should probably not be surprised if we need to do "unnatural" things to attain that longevity.

We're now dying of cancer and heart disease and other signs of senescence and system breakdown to which our genes never had a chance or a need to adapt and overcome.
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Old 10-18-2009, 09:42 AM   #20
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I don't think that dying due to obesity or cancer or lack of exercise says that we shouldn't eat what our ancestors ate. It might mean we should try to get closer to the physical conditioning of our ancestors although that is almost impossible in our modern life.

And the fact that humans keep living longer throughout the millennia indicates to me that there is likely at least some small benefit to longevity that helps our descendants reproduce.

I don't see that there is such a clear indication that milk in the diet guarantees clogged arteries at older ages when there are so many other dietary factors and so many additional non-dietary factors at play. So I just don't get that particular part of your point. You are saying it is clear we should eat differently from our ancestors? And if so, in what way - which ways have been proven to be better?

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