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Old 08-04-2012, 04:09 PM   #41
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College wasn't exactly "fun", but I enjoyed the subsequent 10 years in the submarine force. Then we started a family and learned that the military pretty much just gives lip service to the concepts of "quality of life" and "work/life" balance. That was a powerful motivator for financial independence.

Last month I joined Facebook's "Cold War Submarine Veterans" group. (https://www.facebook.com/groups/301725556590883/) It's been awesome group therapy camaraderie. It's brought back all my happy memories of those times, and provided commiseration over all the not-so-happy times. I should've joined that group 25 years ago...
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More to life than work
Old 08-07-2012, 11:09 AM   #42
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More to life than work

When my husband died suddenly last year at age 58 I decided that life is too short to spend only 20% of it doing the things that I liked, spending time with children and grandchildren. Because of his caring about the future, I am able to retire at 59. Now I just need to pick the date and I will be free.
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Old 08-07-2012, 11:48 AM   #43
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1. Because I'm getting lazy
2. Because I can
+ 1,(if I'm honest with myself). That, plus the acknowledgement that I am playing the back 9 was all I needed.
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Old 08-07-2012, 12:25 PM   #44
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I've not yet held a full-time job that I love. I've had ones that are ok, and I'm ok with what I do now, but the idea of loving a job is foreign to me. I do enjoy the people I work with, and that would be a loss when in retirement, but once I no longer have to work (based on my own level of confort), I'm not going to. If I get bored, I can always go get a job, maybe part time if I want, but I've got a LOT of hobbies, so I can't imagine not being able to find something to entertain myself with. I am a musician and have played in bands off and on for about 25 years, so when I retire, I might join an old guy blues band or something like that. Would leave me more time to run, play music, etc.

Takes a certain personality type to really enjoy retirement, and I've got the personality type (ISFJ) that most enjoys retirement.

Want to take that personality test? Jung - Myers - Briggs Quiz
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Old 08-07-2012, 12:46 PM   #45
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Then we started a family and learned that the military pretty much just gives lip service to the concepts of "quality of life" and "work/life" balance.
In other words, the military is just like any other employer. And I tend to agree that this concept is a powerful motivator. I "work to live" in a culture which is increasingly expecting people to "live to work".
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Old 08-09-2012, 12:36 AM   #46
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When the opportunity came around I quit work. Perhaps if I had found something rewarding I would still be doing it. Frankly, I lack that 8 to 4 work ethic.

I know people who find their career so rewarding. They are Drs and nurses. Maybe caring for others gives you a different outlook. A few of them are in their late 60s and just love what they do.
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Old 08-09-2012, 02:53 AM   #47
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If one can afford to and don't like their job or just don't like working and all the unpleasant things that come along with working, why not retire early? There's a whole new life after ER and it is SO GOOD!
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Old 08-09-2012, 10:16 AM   #48
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When my husband died suddenly last year at age 58 I decided that life is too short to spend only 20% of it doing the things that I liked, spending time with children and grandchildren. Because of his caring about the future, I am able to retire at 59. Now I just need to pick the date and I will be free.
+1

I can agtree with peony on this one. In my case it was a surprise divorce (the husband is always the last to know), the death of a sibling, the death of a good friend and a few new aches and pains of my own. It is time to enjoy life and not wait. Thankfully, 44 years of working, educating myself, saving and investing have paid off.
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Old 08-09-2012, 12:15 PM   #49
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I "work to live" in a culture which is increasingly expecting people to "live to work".
I had an instructor in flight school who was an Aussie exchange officer. You just echoed his observation of Americans.

Here at the Pentagon, there are folks who retire from the US military after 30 years, then continue to work for upwards of 15 more years as a GS. One guy in my office did 20+ in the USMC, retired in '81, and is still here plugging away every day.
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Old 08-09-2012, 01:13 PM   #50
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Originally Posted by peonyprincess View Post
When my husband died suddenly last year at age 58 I decided that life is too short to spend only 20% of it doing the things that I liked, spending time with children and grandchildren. Because of his caring about the future, I am able to retire at 59. Now I just need to pick the date and I will be free.
Sorry to hear of your loss. I wish you well in retirement. This is a "pre-wish" I guess as it appears you have not yet pulled the trigger. Welcome to the ER site.
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Old 08-09-2012, 01:27 PM   #51
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I loved my work for the first 24 years (medicine) but the last 2 years were brutal. No work/life balance, too much sadness (Hematology/Oncology) and too many "rules". I was a textbook case of burn-out.

Early retirement has given me back my mojo. I wake up happy every day looking forward to more adventures, even if the adventure is learning how to make a killer tortilla soup. Absolutely no regrets.
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Old 08-09-2012, 02:13 PM   #52
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+ 1,(if I'm honest with myself). That, plus the acknowledgement that I am playing the back 9 was all I needed.
These thoughts seem to echo what I am presently feeling with 7 months and 20 days to go. There is just so much more out there to enjoy if you have the ability to do so. I tell my friends when they say "what will you do", what ever I want. You know you don't get the months, days and years back. One has to enjoy the time they have. That and w$rk is highly overrated especially if one is SI with the RE to come in March 2013. Sometimes the DW and I discuss how fortunate we are with our pensions (DW ER'd in May) kind of reminds me of the "blind squirrel finding an acorn" every once and a while along with the old saying "I would rather be lucky than good".

T-bird (SIRE in 2013)
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Old 08-09-2012, 09:16 PM   #53
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Sometimes the DW and I discuss how fortunate we are with our pensions (DW ER'd in May) kind of reminds me of the "blind squirrel finding an acorn" every once and a while along with the old saying "I would rather be lucky than good".

T-bird (SIRE in 2013)
good fortune? Perhaps partly. But, I'll bet if you look back on the last 20-30 years you made a lot of decisions to end up with that pension, you gave up things, you skipped certain "opportunities", you deferred gratification, etc. Many people could have done the same, but they chose not to do so.
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Old 08-09-2012, 09:34 PM   #54
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Reasons Why People Retire Early


My $0.02 worth is that this is the wrong question - the better question is "reasons why people keep working when they don't have to"

I have a bucket list of reasons to retire (either end of 2012 or early 2013) but can't think of too many reasons to carry on beyond that.

Life is a finite quantity and every extra day I spend in the work force is a day I am not out there doing better and more interesting things. Right now I am begrudging every minute I am spending in the office (time spent surfing the internet excluded ).
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Old 08-10-2012, 04:34 PM   #55
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good fortune? Perhaps partly. But, I'll bet if you look back on the last 20-30 years you made a lot of decisions to end up with that pension, you gave up things, you skipped certain "opportunities", you deferred gratification, etc. Many people could have done the same, but they chose not to do so.

Looking back there is alot of truth in your comment. We all have to make decisions regarding "opportunities" and what to do with our earnings. Planning for DW and my retirement has been an active process since mid-80's. It's nice to see the fruits of our efforts come to pass.
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Old 08-10-2012, 09:45 PM   #56
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Because I didn't have to earn a living anymore, i.e. I was financially independent.
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Old 08-10-2012, 09:46 PM   #57
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When my husband died suddenly last year at age 58 I decided that life is too short to spend only 20% of it doing the things that I liked, spending time with children and grandchildren. Because of his caring about the future, I am able to retire at 59. Now I just need to pick the date and I will be free.

Welcome ! I can totally understand .
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Old 08-11-2012, 12:36 AM   #58
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Here at the Pentagon, there are folks who retire from the US military after 30 years, then continue to work for upwards of 15 more years as a GS. One guy in my office did 20+ in the USMC, retired in '81, and is still here plugging away every day.
Even though this guy's a Marine, I think that many veterans of all services within 50 miles of the Pentagon feel a burning desire to measure their relevance by how many dogs they have in the fight...

... although to be perfectly fair in our comparison, we should also determine how many are still working due to divorce/alimony agreements.
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Old 08-12-2012, 05:27 PM   #59
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Well, it appears the science is on our side.....

Scientists say stress can shrink the brain | Health & Fitness | Life | Toronto Sun
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Old 08-12-2012, 10:58 PM   #60
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Ooohhhh, so that's what's been going on in my head...

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