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Old 02-04-2015, 06:35 PM   #41
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I got a Polar FT7 when I joined a company with a wellness program. ... Sadly, the chest straps kept failing. ...
I also have an FT7 and agree the HR strap is not the best. I've had much better luck with Garmins and Sigmas.
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Old 02-04-2015, 07:38 PM   #42
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DW and I just got in from a 10k run....55 minutes.

Or, if you prefer, we just knocked a few minutes off our lifespan.
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Old 02-06-2015, 02:05 PM   #43
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http://www.nytimes.com/2015/02/06/up...d-for-you.html

A closer look at the study. Basically it points out that the sample size is small, and the major point is based on 2 deaths of the 40 strenuous runners. Had there been a 3rd death, there'd probably be a ban on running if we paid attention to this study. Had there been 1 less death, then everyone should run as hard as they can, most likely.
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Old 02-06-2015, 03:34 PM   #44
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Like anything, if you have no background in HR, it won't serve you well right off the bat. The rule of thumb is 220-Age for max HR, but most casual runners won't ever get anything anywhere close to that.

I like RPE (rate of perceived exertion). For most of us, it can be summarized as follows:

Easy - Conversation with little difficulty
Moderate - Conversation getting 3-4 words out before a breath
Tempo - Can't sustain conversation, a word or two
Hard/5K race - should start blacking out around the edges of your eyes if you're doing it right. :-)

For HR, I'm 37, my max HR these days is probably in the neighborhood of 185-187. Younger, I'd be up around 191. If I'm going at 5K pace, I can sustain as high as 181. Most of my early season easy stuff is 150-160. Endurance building runs 160-165ish, tempo up to 171. Any intervals and such I'm higher than that, 176-178 a lot.

I've been using HR for more than a decade, and it takes time to get your HRs down to exertion, and then you have to remember that HR lags exertion by minutes, which is key, especially on the bike where you can blow your legs up pretty quick while your HR lags.

Anyway, just some HR stuff. I say, "no time like the present." The sooner you can tie a HR to an RPE, the sooner it becomes a useful pacing tool in your racing/training... then you can have fun with Lactate Threshold Rate (mine is 176-178 depending on the time of year!) and all the goodness that comes with it!
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Old 02-06-2015, 04:18 PM   #45
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Agree HR is a useful tool, but not perfect. HR can also be affected by non-exertional factors like emotion, climate, pain, dehydration, etc. And many monitors can have technical issues producing false readings. There are some gifted athletes who prefer not to use HRMs for most of their training.

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Old 02-06-2015, 07:03 PM   #46
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Definitely. Perceived exertion may be lower when your heart rate is higher when you're overtrained, stressed, sleep-deprived... it's imperfect, but it's a lot less subjective than other measures. I mix and match training with HR, pace, and "by feel", but I almost always race by feel.
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Old 02-06-2015, 09:14 PM   #47
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I recently switched from a Polar FT4 HR monitor to a GPS watch with HR monitor and find it's a great improvement. The one I use is made by Papago (model 770) but most of the manufacturers make them now. I have found the HR monitor on the Papago to be a lot more accurate then the Polar I used, it never seems to drop out or give crazy readings. What I like about it the most is that it collects all the GPS and HR data for your workouts and you can download it to their web site where it presents everything in nice graphs and shows a google type map of your route. I also like being able to glance at my watch at any point during a workout (jog, hike, bike) and to be able to see exactly how far I've gone up to that point, the current pace I'm going at, and my HR. To me it's a huge improvement over the basic HR monitor that I used for so long.
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Old 02-07-2015, 08:11 AM   #48
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I have found the HR monitor on the Papago to be a lot more accurate then the Polar I used, it never seems to drop out or give crazy readings.
Thanks! I may want to get one before I start the charity bike rides in the summer since I sold the FT7 on e-Bay (minus the flaky strap).
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Old 02-07-2015, 09:48 AM   #49
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I recently switched from a Polar FT4 HR monitor to a GPS watch with HR monitor and find it's a great improvement. The one I use is made by Papago (model 770) but most of the manufacturers make them now.

I have a Polar FT7 and have noticed the chest strap flakes out on occasion. Overall I've been very happy with it, it's simple and therefore easy to use. When I bought it I decided to go with a basic model to see if I'd use it much. I have, I especially like using it on long and strenuous day hikes and backpacking trips as well as when jogging at the gym.

I'm starting to look at new monitors as I am sure a lot has changed since I bought the FT7. I'd like to see what features are available and think about what will be useful for me. I will research the papago 770.

Maybe I'll start a new thread or bump an older one on HR monitor features.
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Old 02-07-2015, 10:36 AM   #50
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I live with a runner, that's enuff for me. Never have liked running unless being chased. I take some aerobics and weight lifting classes, walk when the snow/ ice is gone.
I like to think I am built for comfort rather than speed.
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Old 04-10-2015, 03:47 PM   #51
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And here's another view, that says that "excessive running" (50 miles/week, fairly typical of marathoners) poses no extra risks.

Study Finds High Levels of Exercise Won't Kill You | Runner's World & Running Times

Is this the definitive study? Of course not, but neither is the one in the OP that says that this level of running is as risky as not running at all. I'll bet this one gets less attention because more people would like to hear that that sitting on the couch isn't so bad after all, even if it's probably not true.

Again, I'll say that you should do whatever activity appeals to you so that you'll continue to do it. Running definitely isn't for everyone, but you non-runners don't have to worry that we're harming ourselves.

And since I previously mentioned a race I had upcoming, I'll follow up that I did complete my 100 mile race 2 weeks ago. It took me over 26 hours but other than having to sit inside and warm up and take in soup during a bad stretch about 2/3 of the way in, I felt good throughout the race and have had no recovery issues after (other than a couple painful blisters).
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Old 04-10-2015, 04:00 PM   #52
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I did complete my 100 mile race 2 weeks ago.
Very impressive. Congratulations!
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Old 04-10-2015, 05:12 PM   #53
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Very impressive. Congratulations!

+1. I can't comprehend how people can run 100 miles in one outing.


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Old 04-10-2015, 05:20 PM   #54
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+1. I can't comprehend how people can run 100 miles in one outing.
Part of it was to not think about running (and walking) 100 miles, but rather to break it down into one 12.5 loop at a time. I had a plan for each loop and focused on that loop alone, and then when that was over I moved onto the next loop.
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Old 04-10-2015, 05:22 PM   #55
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I was a long distance runner in the early 80's through the early 90's in Connecticut. Ran a few marathons, other races, trained in the winter on an elevated track at the Y. Stayed at a trim 147 lbs for nearly 10 years at 5'11''.

Now I have a full hip implant. Knees and lungs are still good though.
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Old 04-10-2015, 05:38 PM   #56
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Part of it was to not think about running (and walking) 100 miles, but rather to break it down into one 12.5 loop at a time. I had a plan for each loop and focused on that loop alone, and then when that was over I moved onto the next loop.

Great job. In terms of breaking it down into manageable chunks, I do the same thing when running a marathon. You just had many more chunks to manage your plan and imagination through.


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Old 04-10-2015, 05:39 PM   #57
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I ran some marathons in the early 80's also. Maybe a couple in the 90's. But my weight at 180 lbs is not ideal for running marathons. I developed knee, ankle, back and hip problems, so I had to slow down. So I started running 5k's about 5 years ago, even winning my age group in one 5k.

I eventually stopped, but started again last week - doing intervals of sprints and walking. my chiro told me that interval training is the best. I'll see how it goes, but I like the walking part far more than the running part so far. For me - the article makes sense - the harder I trained, the more structural damage I had.
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Old 04-10-2015, 05:52 PM   #58
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Running Bum, Congratulations!

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+1. I can't comprehend how people can run 100 miles in one outing.
Ronstar, Maybe Running Bum can take you with him next time so you can comprehend. I'll follow you in the support vehicle and take pictures.
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Old 04-10-2015, 06:21 PM   #59
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Running Bum, Congratulations!



Ronstar, Maybe Running Bum can take you with him next time so you can comprehend. I'll follow you in the support vehicle and take pictures.
I have a better idea - I'll ride in the support vehicle - bring the split window.
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Old 04-10-2015, 06:35 PM   #60
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I have a better idea - I'll ride in the support vehicle - bring the split window.
Count me in! No more running for me (can't pound the new hip that hard). I have a camera and a note pad.
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