Join Early Retirement Today
Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 06-22-2014, 06:26 AM   #21
Moderator
MichaelB's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Rocky Inlets
Posts: 24,492
Quote:
Originally Posted by imoldernu View Post
From first hand experience.

The cruelest thing you can do is to pressure a senior to take this or any test of cognitive ability. The implications that come from "failing" are so devastating that the effective result is to place a pall on the remaining years.
Well, my first hand experience and yours do not agree. This is not cruel, by the time everyone agrees that a visit to the neurologist is needed there really isn't much doubt about what's happening. It is sad, and scary, and the person afflicted needs help, and a good friend. They only witness the beginning of their decline, however, and soon enough awareness goes the same way as the cognitive decline.

Quote:
Originally Posted by NW-Bound View Post
I look at the test, and it is scary to think that this is just the beginning for someone who fails it.

But is there really any medical help?
Super scary, and there is no cure. The diagnosis is based on a verbal form of the test from the OP, and from the data, a significant % of cases are still mid-diagnosed.

The only medications available are designed to slow the course of progress of the disease, there is no way to know if they are working or how well.

Quote:
Originally Posted by NW-Bound
Anyway, there are so many medical problems we geezers will have to face, and not all of us will live long enough to worry about Alzheimer, if that is any consolation.
Hopefully.
__________________

__________________
MichaelB is offline   Reply With Quote
Join the #1 Early Retirement and Financial Independence Forum Today - It's Totally Free!

Are you planning to be financially independent as early as possible so you can live life on your own terms? Discuss successful investing strategies, asset allocation models, tax strategies and other related topics in our online forum community. Our members range from young folks just starting their journey to financial independence, military retirees and even multimillionaires. No matter where you fit in you'll find that Early-Retirement.org is a great community to join. Best of all it's totally FREE!

You are currently viewing our boards as a guest so you have limited access to our community. Please take the time to register and you will gain a lot of great new features including; the ability to participate in discussions, network with our members, see fewer ads, upload photographs, create a retirement blog, send private messages and so much, much more!

Old 06-22-2014, 11:02 AM   #22
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
imoldernu's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Location: Peru
Posts: 4,616
Quote:
Well, my first hand experience and yours do not agree. This is not cruel, by the time everyone agrees that a visit to the neurologist is needed there really isn't much doubt about what's happening. It is sad, and scary, and the person afflicted needs help, and a good friend. They only witness the beginning of their decline, however, and soon enough awareness goes the same way as the cognitive decline.

First hand is self...
__________________

__________________
imoldernu is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-22-2014, 12:39 PM   #23
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
Katsmeow's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Posts: 3,400
Quote:
Originally Posted by MichaelB View Post
Super scary, and there is no cure. The diagnosis is based on a verbal form of the test from the OP, and from the data, a significant % of cases are still mid-diagnosed.

The only medications available are designed to slow the course of progress of the disease, there is no way to know if they are working or how well.
For Alzheimer's and many other dementias, this is true. On the other hand, there can be things (such as medication related) that might be able to be corrected. I don't think I want to just assume someone has Alzheimer's when maybe it is something else that something could be done.

And, of course, there are planning aspects that may be important even if it is Alzheimer's. We've talked here about some of those, such as how the spouse protects her/himself so as not to become impoverished, etc.

Where I have more difficulty is figuring out if I would want to know of a genetic predisposition years before any diagnosis could be made.
__________________
Katsmeow is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-22-2014, 01:01 PM   #24
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
Mulligan's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2009
Posts: 7,384
Test was easy enough. Though it damn well should be since I am only 50. Saw a commercial last night on Alzheimer's awareness. 10 signs they said with the one shown being a woman who was looking for her lost car keys with hubby finding them...in the fridge. Hopefully I am a long ways from doing that. I fear cancer way more than Alzheimer's. I will believe a doctor if he tells me I have cancer, but if one tells me I have Alzheimer's I am sure I will be the denier type and not believe him.


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
__________________
Mulligan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-22-2014, 01:19 PM   #25
Moderator
MichaelB's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Rocky Inlets
Posts: 24,492
Quote:
Originally Posted by imoldernu View Post

First hand is self...
Then I guess our hands disagree as well. Mine is directly observed experience, starting with "let's go see a doctor" and still underway. I'm not sure what is worse, suffering the disease or watching a loved one decline and feeling the genetic breath of fate ripple across the back of one's neck.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Katsmeow View Post
For Alzheimer's and many other dementias, this is true. On the other hand, there can be things (such as medication related) that might be able to be corrected. I don't think I want to just assume someone has Alzheimer's when maybe it is something else that something could be done.
Alzheimer's is more of a default when other causes have been ruled out, and some, such as vascular dementia, can be stopped (but not reversed). Getting a good diagnosis early can make a big difference.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Katsmeow View Post

And, of course, there are planning aspects that may be important even if it is Alzheimer's. We've talked here about some of those, such as how the spouse protects her/himself so as not to become impoverished, etc.

Where I have more difficulty is figuring out if I would want to know of a genetic predisposition years before any diagnosis could be made.
No easy choices on either.
__________________
MichaelB is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-22-2014, 01:53 PM   #26
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Posts: 5,604
It's not an easy decision, hard to watch and hard on the patient. Watched both parents go through severe dementia. DM kept her sweet disposition throughout her ordeal, she appeared to become even kinder and more loving. DF got very mean and nasty, caused ontold numbers of problems for the family. I wish he could have confided in a family member, but that didn't happen.

One of the tests routinely run is 20-25 standard questions. Name, date, where are you? DF was far to the right of Genghis Kahn in his political beliefs. When the DR. asked who the current President was oh boy. DF went off, "he's no President". Then he proceeded to review every President that served back to and including FDR. Despite that his DR. knew he had issues. We found it odd, no one every questioned his ability to drive. He had sold his car a year prior but still had his license.
__________________
MRG is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-22-2014, 02:11 PM   #27
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
Katsmeow's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Posts: 3,400
Quote:
Originally Posted by MichaelB View Post
Alzheimer's is more of a default when other causes have been ruled out, and some, such as vascular dementia, can be stopped (but not reversed). Getting a good diagnosis early can make a big difference.
Sure, but we were talking (I thought) about this self-screening test and whether one would want to know the result on it. That is something to be used way before all those other causes would be ruled out. It seemed to me that imoldernu was advocating not even doing the screening test, let alone following it up to rule out other things.
__________________
Katsmeow is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-22-2014, 03:58 PM   #28
Moderator
MichaelB's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Rocky Inlets
Posts: 24,492
Quote:
Originally Posted by Katsmeow View Post
Sure, but we were talking (I thought) about this self-screening test and whether one would want to know the result on it. That is something to be used way before all those other causes would be ruled out. It seemed to me that imoldernu was advocating not even doing the screening test, let alone following it up to rule out other things.
It's a terrible choice to have to make, and I don't think there is a right answer.
__________________
MichaelB is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-22-2014, 04:04 PM   #29
Moderator
Walt34's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Eastern WV Panhandle
Posts: 16,579
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tadpole View Post
Part of the Medicare "Wellness" visit that our doctor gave my husband was: at the beginning of the visit he was given three words to remember. The rest of the visit progressed and at the end he was ask to recall the three words.
I might have had trouble with that one 30 years ago, never been good at that sort of thing. That's why I carried a small shirt pocket notebook and pen all the time.
__________________
I heard the call to do nothing. So I answered it.
Walt34 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-22-2014, 05:15 PM   #30
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
 
Join Date: Jun 2014
Posts: 1,466
My good friend was sadly diagnosed with Alzheimer's at age 62 but had to quit working at 54 due to memory issues. This person was brilliant at one time. However, she is on meds now that are helping her. That would be the reason to see a doc earlier rather then later.
__________________
Teacher Terry is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-23-2014, 06:54 AM   #31
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
donheff's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Washington, DC
Posts: 8,650
Quote:
Originally Posted by imoldernu View Post
From first hand experience.

The cruelest thing you can do is to pressure a senior to take this or any test of cognitive ability. The implications that come from "failing" are so devastating that the effective result is to place a pall on the remaining years.

Consider your own reaction, if the continuation of your drivers license depended on passing the test... and you failed. Only a small part of the psychological effect of seeing "final" stamped on life.

If and when a serious cure or amelioration is available, this will change, but as of now... testing?... no way!

Make your judgement when you get "there"... Presuming you know how you will feel about this then, may be premature.
I agree that this can be a problem. This devastated my FIL. In his cases the decline was obvious so all the testing did was document the degree. Some people realize the problem effecting themselves and want testing to help their family design a course of maintenance. In that case testing makes sense but I would be reluctant to impose it so the family has a tad more info. On the other hand, considerate neurological testing could address possible causes unrelated to Alzheimer's that could be treated. For example, lots of nursing home patients experience cognitive impairments from drug interactions. Bottom line for me is get an examination and try to avoid the conotation that you are documenting mental decline. Easier said than done although my brother achieved it with my SIL.
__________________
Every man is, or hopes to be, an Idler. -- Samuel Johnson
donheff is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 06-24-2014, 02:07 AM   #32
Full time employment: Posting here.
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Location: No Where for Very Long
Posts: 747
Quote:
Originally Posted by Teacher Terry View Post
My good friend was sadly diagnosed with Alzheimer's at age 62 but had to quit working at 54 due to memory issues. This person was brilliant at one time. However, she is on meds now that are helping her. That would be the reason to see a doc earlier rather then later.
I agree.

If we suspected some one was likely to develop cancer would we advise them to avoid screening tests?

My Dad has Alzheimer's and it scares the bejesus out of me. But I took the test and will continue to be watchful about memory issues. Had I failed the test, I would seek medical treatment ASAP.

Not to be na´ve but some times the longer we live, the greater the chance of medical technology improving management of the disease. I doubt a cure for the dreaded "A" is on the near horizon but simply slowing or halting the progression is a huge benefit.
__________________

__________________

Lancelot is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Citicard fraud detection- WOW!!! ERhoosier Other topics 9 07-26-2013 04:38 PM
Penfed fraud detection, or lack of it Alan Other topics 66 07-24-2013 04:00 PM
Friend diagnosed with Early Onset Alzheimer's? Midpack Health and Early Retirement 23 08-01-2012 03:10 PM
Automated Copyright Infringement Detection TromboneAl Other topics 11 12-10-2010 01:02 AM
Free Spyware detection and removal Paul Other topics 4 12-06-2004 04:55 AM

 

 
All times are GMT -6. The time now is 06:59 AM.
 
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.