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Old 09-06-2014, 02:36 PM   #21
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I read Younger Next Year and was pretty impressed but wondered whether it is like a diet that involves eating things you don't like -- too hard to persist. Then I read Body by Science and was even more impressed. Their prescription is once weekly short but very intense weight lifting. I ended up splitting the difference. I head to the gym twice weekly for brief weight sets - a few core exercise to failure. And several days a week DW and I ride our bikes in the 20-30 mile range. Our riding is recreational - we don't go all out but ride at a brisk, comfortable pace. I have never felt better.
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Old 09-06-2014, 02:40 PM   #22
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I'm reading "Younger Next Year" even as we speak. A guy I know from the gym who recently retired in his mid-late 50's mentioned it a while back and then lent it to me. He seems to be a fanatic about exercise (although he says he was in pretty lousy shape when he retired last year.) He will often do a spinning class (50 minutes or so) followed by either an aerobics class (an hour) or an hour on the elliptical.

I am 69, having been exercising moderately most of my life and although I find the book very interesting and convincing, I am content to follow the hard-easy routine. I will do a spinning class or a session on a Concept 2 Rower or elliptical one day and work it pretty hard. I'll also stretch and do abs after that. The next day a nice long walk on the beach with the dog followed by some stretches seems to be the right thing for my. My goal (not always met) is to do something just about every day with maybe one day a week off. An ideal week would be 3 days of the intense stuff alternated with 3 days of nice long walks. I confess I do not do well keeping a strength program going for very long at a time.
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Old 09-06-2014, 03:17 PM   #23
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I had a good exercise week because I slowed down and now drink LOTS of water when cycling and running. I have a heart rate monitor which helps me a lot because I realize I don't have to push myself. This week was first time I have run 4 miles three days in a row with 2 days of cycling and another 4 mile run, that made 6 days of cardio this week.

I lose about a half-pound of water weight every running mile, so I have to drink while running. For cycling, I drink about a half-gallon of liquids an hour.

I was not really drinking enough until this post which was helpful: Daily percent change in your weight

I also walk the dog about 4 miles a day and lose about 2 pounds of water weight doing that.

I've lost 15 pounds in the past 3 months and my resting heart rate is in the low 40's.

Also some weight lifting going on, too. I have an abs competition with my 18-year-old son.
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Old 09-06-2014, 05:48 PM   #24
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This is an interesting set of conditions that everyone uses to stay more or less fit. Like some others I really don't like exercise (it's work!) but I like less what happens to me if I don't. For now, common sense applies and if I get fatigued or burned out on it I'll cut back.

But for now I like the effects that are going on!
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Old 09-12-2014, 10:22 AM   #25
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I'll of course ask my doctor about this but I'm wondering if the reason I'm feeling so much better is having the clogged heart artery cleared or is it the exercise, or both? If there is that much difference between three days a week and six days a week at the gym I'm going to ask them to set up an additional workout for alternate days and keep going six days when the rehab program is over.
I think having the artery cleared plays a part, but I don't know how much. Where I think you are getting much of the benefit you're feeling is from the programming in the cardiac rehab program, not the extra days in the gym.

When I look at the gym regulars (4-6 days a week for a year or more), who aren't working with a trainer, I see a lot of stagnation and a lot of mistakes. The stagnated ones are the guys/gals who come in every day and do the exact same routine - there will never be growth without change - and never really challenge themselves. The mistakes are usually people who do challenge themselves, but their training has holes that neglect important aspects of fitness - most of them get injured at some point.

A good program has amazing benefits that most of us can't get for ourselves. Someone observing and tracking performance tends to keep us motivated and work harder. A good trainer will know when to push and when to make someone back off a little. Psychology is a big part of developing a program and training someone.
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Old 09-12-2014, 01:37 PM   #26
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A good program has amazing benefits that most of us can't get for ourselves. Someone observing and tracking performance tends to keep us motivated and work harder. A good trainer will know when to push and when to make someone back off a little. Psychology is a big part of developing a program and training someone.
Amen to that. I have been working with a personal trainer twice a week for about 8 months (and I go three other times per week on my own), and I have noticed pretty dramatic results. A trainer is expensive, but I think I'm worth it. She definitely pushes me beyond what I would normally do, and insures that my form is correct. As Leonidas says, I see people making tons of mistakes on form, not getting the most out of their time in the gym, or worse, risking injury.

I know that since I have improved my nutrition and have been a regular at the gym, I just feel a lot better. I hope I'm hooked.
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Old 09-12-2014, 07:11 PM   #27
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.... Then I read Body by Science and was even more impressed. Their prescription is once weekly short but very intense weight lifting.....
Strength training certainly has its benefits, but the great bulk of evidence does NOT support this heavy-lifting-only approach to overall fitness and cardio health.

The general recommendation of the American College of Cardiology, based on extensive review of available scientific literature, is for 3-4 sessions of moderate to vigorous physical activity per week. This has been shown to help both blood pressure and cholesterol profile (lower LDL, raise HDL).
http://content.onlinejacc.org/articl...icleid=1770218
This is very similar to the recommendations of the American College of Sports Medicine.
http://journals.lww.com/acsm-msse/Fu...loping.26.aspx
And US Health Human Services recommendations state-
“Most health benefits occur with at least 150 minutes (2 hours and 30 minutes) a week of moderate-intensity physical activity, such as brisk walking. Additional benefits occur with more physical activity”. (This Guideline also states that some activity is better than none).
2008 Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans: Summary

Proper resistance (strength) training clearly has health benefits, inc for older folks. But in real life, "very intense" lifting poses a significant risk of injury which increases with age and duration of "very intense"" training... not to mention added risks in those with serious underlying health issues. EVERY major scientific health organization I am aware of views resistance training as a supplement to, NOT a substitute for, aerobic activity when seeking overall health benefits from exercise.

And, of course, NO ONE should start any exercise program without checking with their doc first!
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Old 09-12-2014, 07:19 PM   #28
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Some myth debunking is collected in Gretchen Reynolds' 2012 book "The First 20 Minutes".
Folks may be familiar with her since she writes for the NY Times and routinely covers new scientific studies on exercise, weight training, diet, stretching, warming up, etc. I'm reading it now and it is very enlightening.


That Guideline is so 2008. I'm not sure if it hasn't changed already.
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Old 09-13-2014, 09:46 AM   #29
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Proper resistance (strength) training clearly has health benefits, inc for older folks. But in real life, "very intense" lifting poses a significant risk of injury which increases with age and duration of "very intense"" training... not to mention added risks in those with serious underlying health issues. EVERY major scientific health organization I am aware of views resistance training as a supplement to, NOT a substitute for, aerobic activity when seeking overall health benefits from exercise.

And, of course, NO ONE should start any exercise program without checking with their doc first!
I don't think it was implied that one should flash cut into a very intense program, at least that would not be my interpretation. Strength training is great, but you have to build up to more intense levels slowly over time, and that can be done even by older folks.
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Old 09-13-2014, 10:57 AM   #30
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I don't like gym workouts.....too much time getting there and back home......too concerned about how I look during a workout. So, I bought a treadmill and parked a TV in front of it and walk 3 miles a day, 7 days a week unless I'm traveling. ....2miles every morning and 1 mile every late afternoon. Since I started doing this 7 years ago AND eliminated most sugar from my diet.....adding veggies and fruit I've lost over 45 lbs, have only had a couple of colds in all those years and feel great. My point is 6 days a week is better than 3 and you don't need to get fancy with workouts, you just need to get your heart rate up there and do it every day. I eat lean meat, fish, dry baked potato's, baked beans, salads every day for lunch with low fat dressing......never have cake or pie.....this change because I was a pre diabetic changed my life, how I feel and how I look.......And, I don't miss the sweets and love my veggies.....most of the time theyare broiled with Pam. Good Luck keeping your health.....without it we really have nothing.
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Old 09-13-2014, 06:44 PM   #31
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I don't like gym workouts.....too much time getting there and back home......too concerned about how I look during a workout.

Our fitness center is 10- minute bike ride from the house. Sometimes I just do a long bike ride but sometimes I bicycle over to the fitness center and back. Win-win!

Congratulations on all the good changes you've made. Isn't cheap prevention wonderful?
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Old 09-13-2014, 09:34 PM   #32
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I don't think it was implied that one should flash cut into a very intense program, at least that would not be my interpretation. Strength training is great, but you have to build up to more intense levels slowly over time, and that can be done even by older folks.

Unfortunately, that is PRECISELY what some of these type programs are advocating. There's even been radio ads running in my area in which local personalities claim to be feeling great after their FIRST workout of a 'low-count reps to muscle fatigue failure' style program. Sounds like "flash cut into a very intense program" to me.

Agree 100% that controlled adaptation is the key to best results with least risk of injury (either acute or chronic injury). No question that older folks can benefit from resistance training.....even nursing home residents whose main goals are simply to walk up a few steps again or regain some ability to care for themselves. That 1st weight lift may be measured in ounces, but there is no age limit on the ability to improve strength/fitness.
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