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Old 04-14-2019, 06:57 PM   #61
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Superman also depended upon the sun for his powers. But he lived in Kansas and then presumably NYC, both in low vitamin D areas?
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Old 04-14-2019, 07:26 PM   #62
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Yes, the AHA and the food pyramid (if it's still used and understood) are trustworthy. The work has already been done to identify trustworthy sources. -- a "Dr." in front of a name, especially a bunch of doctors hired to head an agency specializing in a particular subject, quoted in conventional media HUGELY outweighs some non-physician blogger attempting to review the literature.
Well, I guess we will have to agree to disagree about the AHA. Here's an article about where most of their funding comes from:

https://truthout.org/articles/the-am...-not-patients/

And with regard to blindly following the advice of anyone with a "Dr." in front of their name - good luck with that. Most traditional physicians receive basically zero education in nutrition and health during their medical training - yet we expect them to be experts in nutrition. Does that make sense to you? Some physicians, though, are actually are interested in nutrition, and seek additional training/information on the subject after they become physicians. Those physicians are the ones I seek out and listen to. Here is one example of such a physician -Dr. Colin Champ is an oncologist at the Univ. of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute who has done considerable research on the subject of diet/nutrition and cancer. He's a smart guy, but his advice about nutrition (based on his research, and other research he has reviewed) sometimes runs contrary to the traditional advice from AHA and others. So if you believe everything AHA has to say, you will probably disregard Dr. Champ's advice also, and that's your choice. But keep in mind that not everyone with a "Dr." in front of their name believes the same things, when it comes to nutrition and health.

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Old 04-14-2019, 08:19 PM   #63
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This guy took Vitamin D supplements to the extreme and it led to severe kidney damage.


https://www.sciencedaily.com/release...0408114319.htm
My understanding is that 10,000 IU of Vitamin D3 daily is not considered an extreme dose at all, but rather the top range of what is considered a safe dose. And at least 5,000 IU daily is often recommended for people with low Vitamin D. So I don't get the blood calcium problem.
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Old 04-14-2019, 08:21 PM   #64
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It's a balance, right? A balance between the good vitamin D, and the bad exposure. I made some fun about my current life at 36, but in all seriousness, I lived at 26 for a while and I can tell you it is brutal for a fair skinned person. I'm paying for it today with removals of AK lesions, and a constant awareness of my skin.

But here's the weird thing, FOOT melanoma is fairly common and deadly. Why? Why isn't "wrist" melanoma common? Most of the time our feet are covered. And dark skinned people get melanoma in the feet too (Bob Marley, for example).

I had a good friend die at age 50 from what they thought was foot melanoma. His first symptom was swelling in the groin. It was way too late by then. The pathologist said it was melanoma, yet he and his doctors never found the actual original lesion. They just assume it was his foot, because that is a fairly common hidden source.
My understanding is that many cases of melanoma are located with there is no or minimal sun exposure.
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Old 04-15-2019, 07:27 AM   #65
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Here’s more health related news that might be gobbly-gook or another case of the experts jumping to conclusions thanks to bad science. Time will tell.

https://www.outsideonline.com/238075...cancer-science

“These rebels argue that what made the people with high vitamin D levels so healthy was not the vitamin itself. That was just a marker. Their vitamin D levels were high because they were getting plenty of exposure to the thing that was really responsible for their good health—that big orange ball shining down from above.”
What are the author’s credentials? Is this a respected publication? Why should I believe it is worth reading?
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Old 04-15-2019, 07:48 AM   #66
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What are the author’s credentials? Is this a respected publication? Why should I believe it is worth reading?
Bio | Rowan Jacobsen
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Old 04-15-2019, 08:02 AM   #67
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OK, thanks.

I will still use some sun screen on my face and wear a hat (thin hair nowadays).
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Old 04-15-2019, 11:25 AM   #68
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This site is fun and surprising:

https://fastrt.nilu.no/VitD-ez_quartMED.html

It calculates how much sun exposure you need for a healthy dose of Vitamin D.
Have you noticed that regardless of sun exposure, you cannot get enough Vitamin D in the winter months in higher latitude? I get UVB via tanning bed living in Canada during winter (one 7 to 8-minute session every week or every 10 days for most weeks and I cover my face and hands to avoid sun-related wrinkles... I get slightly tanned from it. My legs are tanned about the same level as at the end of summer playing beach vball once a week.). I do feel the difference (mood) which I never did from oral Vit-D supplementation.
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Old 04-15-2019, 03:17 PM   #69
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Each species is exquisitely adapted to its environment. As an example, the cardinal searches outdoors all day for seeds, worms and insects. Clearly he has evolved to have a high activity level, be outdoors and eat seeds and insects.

On the other hand, humans have evolved to stay indoors, sit on the sofa and eat pizza and drink soda.
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Old 04-15-2019, 03:32 PM   #70
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Going out at 6pm to get 2 hours of Vitamin D while playing Pickleball.
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Old 04-15-2019, 11:26 PM   #71
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And with regard to blindly following the advice of anyone with a "Dr." in front of their name - good luck with that.
Not blindly. I use kind of a point system. When it's a Dr. or government agency vs something like the truthout website, game over. With any luck I'll avoid even overhearing what truthout says. 60 Minutes maybe, but not truthout.

I used to listen to Gary Null, an extreme nutritionist on public radio. I used to believe him pretty much but one day I was in a medical library and had a chance to check up on one of his references. He'd always complain that doctors say "the article doesn't say that." Well, the one I looked up "didn't say that" either. I eventually had a list of things I hated about him and emailed it to his station when there was a campaign to keep him on the air. I wanted him off.
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Old 04-16-2019, 07:59 PM   #72
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Not blindly. I use kind of a point system. When it's a Dr. or government agency vs something like the truthout website, game over. With any luck I'll avoid even overhearing what truthout says. 60 Minutes maybe, but not truthout.

OK. But what about when a Physician offers advice that is directly contrary to what a govt. agency is providing........who do you believe then? I follow several the websites/blogs of several physicians who, based on their knowledge and research, feel that the traditional advice on diet/nutrition from government, and organizations like AHA, is deeply flawed. I mentioned Dr. Colin Champ (oncologist) as one of those, and I could name several others.......Dr. William Davis, Dr. Mark Hyman, Dr. David Perlmutter.......I could go on. How does your point system work in cases like that? Would you trust the diet/nutrition advice from a physician who received no training in those subject in med. school, over a physician who has spent years studying and researching those subjects after they received their medical degree? All of the physicians I have mentioned above fall into the latter category.
And yes, I know that there are some physicians out there who have studied nutrition after they received their medical degrees who continue to preach the traditional, AHA/USDA advice on diet. Dr. Walter Willett is an example. My basic point, though, is that just because someone has a "Dr." in front of their name is not a good reason to believe whatever comes out of their mouth (especially since you can get conflicting advice from physicians with essentially the same credentials). You need to do some critical thinking for yourself, and not simply trust the advice from anyone based solely on their credentials.
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Old 04-17-2019, 10:20 PM   #73
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OK. But what about when a Physician offers advice that is directly contrary to what a govt. agency is providing.
Usually the government agency, but it depends. If it's a new study that was reported in a good newspaper and other physicians believe it's convincing, then it could be too new for a government agency to have reviewed and I may change my diet because of it.

Quote:
I follow several the websites/blogs of several physicians who, based on their knowledge and research, feel that the traditional advice on diet/nutrition from government, and organizations like AHA, is deeply flawed...How does your point system work in cases like that?
The government and organizations win without me even researching unless it's reported in generally respected media and sounds worthy of my review.
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Old 04-17-2019, 10:32 PM   #74
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I follow several the websites/blogs of several physicians who, based on their knowledge and research, feel that the traditional advice on diet/nutrition from government, and organizations like AHA, is deeply flawed...How does your point system work in cases like that?
The government and organizations win without me even researching unless it's reported in generally respected media and sounds worthy of my review.
I think there are exceptions here too. The government may say something generally favorable about an artificial ingredient or a chemical, and I may hear more detail somewhere else. It may be easy to avoid and I may not want to take a chance with it. But I've found some decent detail from government sources and I can't even give an example of when I went against the government. I think they're pretty good about saying when more information is needed. I think the say that about the new fire retardants in foam and about tooth whiteners, even though they're legal.
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Old 04-18-2019, 06:45 PM   #75
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My understanding is that many cases of melanoma are located with there is no or minimal sun exposure.
You mean ... where the sun don't shine? OMG!
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Old 04-18-2019, 06:47 PM   #76
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You mean ... where the sun don't shine? OMG!
Well, yes - that is one of the areas people get melanoma.
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Old 04-18-2019, 06:53 PM   #77
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Aaagh!
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Old 04-20-2019, 12:25 AM   #78
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Yes, but nonmelanoma skin cancer is MUCH less life-threatening than melanoma. 75% of NMSC cases are basal cell carcinomas, which rarely if ever spread (metastasize) to other parts of the body. The other 25% are typically squamous cell carcinoma, which can infrequently metastasize, but it's still far less serious than melanoma. Melanoma is the skin cancer that is most likely to kill you, as it is much more likely to metastasize, making treatment difficult.

Of course, no one wants to develop either type of skin cancer, but since there is some evidence that getting adequate sun exposure (without burning the skin), and the Vitamin D you are getting from that sun exposure, actually decreases your chances of developing melanoma, I certainly have no concerns about getting a reasonable amount of sun exposure.
I had melanoma on my back that was caught in time to stop it from spreading. For several years after I avoided the sun like a vampire. But after doing some reading I came to the decision that some sun exposure is probably better. I never allow myself to burn but I also never wear sun screen. I try to get the amount of sunlight that my own skin can handle without burning. I read a theory somewhere a long time ago that sunscreen blocks rays that burn skin letting you to stay in the sun longer than your natural skin would allow. But more time in the sun may be letting you get more exposure to damage from other rays that sunscreen does not effectively block.
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Old 04-20-2019, 01:34 AM   #79
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Oh cmon this thread is like an antivaxer blog. The average lifespan of Anyone in 1850 was just 45 years old even if they had a cushy job inside all day.


The average lifespan at any given time is based on all ages. What brought the lifespan down 175 years ago was the large numbers of infants and children who died from infections at a very young age, infections that are largely under control thanks to vaccines.

If you take 10 people, and two die at 2 months of age and the other 8 live to 80, the average lifespan is 64 years. If half of them die at 2 months, then the average lifespan is 40.
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