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View Poll Results: [See scenario below] I'd prefer if my doctor...
said nothing to me about the finding of cataracts. 3 2.80%
told me about them, and educated me on the likely course and future options 102 95.33%
told me and advised surgery at my soonest convenience 2 1.87%
none of the above (please explain in a post) 0 0%
Voters: 107. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 07-07-2009, 03:00 PM   #21
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I want to be a know-it-all so I need the doctor to always tell me everything he/she finds.
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Old 07-07-2009, 03:00 PM   #22
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Originally Posted by bbbamI View Post
Ah...TY
I was still w*rking in 2006 while you all were goofing off.

I was able to vote in the poll, 3 years later.
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Old 07-07-2009, 03:08 PM   #23
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(2) I would like to have it explained to me that the surgery is done all the time (if it is), and how successful it usually is these days. He should tell me if it is often an outpatient procedure and how many days it takes to recover from. Preferably he should also give me a brochure in case I am listening with "deer in the headlight" non-comprehension.
When I found out that I'd torn my knee ligaments, it took me a few weeks just to get to the point where I was ready to do more research.

Even when I was doing the research, it took almost another year before I felt that I had enough info to make a decision.

And then it took more months to find the alternatives and to realize that the initial decision wasn't right for me.

If I'd been presented with a "must schedule surgery by close of business tomorrow" then today I'd be very sorry.
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Old 07-07-2009, 03:09 PM   #24
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When I read this.... I thought this was a no brainer...


So far, the poll results have shown this to be true...
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Old 07-07-2009, 03:11 PM   #25
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The first Optometrist who discovered my cataracts told me and I was grateful . Since I worked in surgery for many years I knew what to expect . The Surgery took ten minutes and I left the Outpatient Center an hour after . I did wear a patch for one day and was advised against any lifting for ten days . Believe me you will know when you are ready for the surgery . I was at the beach and with the bright sun I absolutely could not see plus I was having problems with night time driving . The glare of the headlights would blind me.
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Old 07-07-2009, 03:23 PM   #26
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When I read this.... I thought this was a no brainer...So far, the poll results have shown this to be true...
Me, too, until this post in this thread - Nanannjen expressed an alternate view which surprised me, so as someone who spends a lot of time informing patients about their maladies, I thought I'd do a reality check with a poll.
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Old 07-07-2009, 04:54 PM   #27
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There's another issue here if the doctor doesn't tell you. We all know how applying for health insurance works these days. Health insurers pretty much take your word on the application to save costs, then investigate your records more thoroughly when you need an expensive procedure. If the doctor doesn't tell you about something and you honestly omit it on the application, what if the health insurer gets the doctor's records and it is in there? Then they deny your claim because it's a pre-existing condition, or even worse, cancel your insurance for lying on the application.
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Old 07-07-2009, 04:59 PM   #28
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Another risk in "don't ask don't tell" is that there is a duty to inform the patient of the potential for progressive vision loss, signs and symptoms to look for, etc. I can imagine some sort of vision related accident where the patient claims they never would have undertaken driving/flying/dangerous machinery, etc. if they had known their vision will likely diminish even over years.

I guess in the older days, the patronizing expectation was that the doc knew best about what to reveal and what to hide. I don't feel comfortable with that.
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Old 07-07-2009, 05:26 PM   #29
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Me, too, until this post in this thread - Nanannjen expressed an alternate view which surprised me, so as someone who spends a lot of time informing patients about their maladies, I thought I'd do a reality check with a poll.
Oh yea... I read it earlier and was wondering about it also... but the voting is going 'our' way...
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Old 07-07-2009, 06:38 PM   #30
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There is a possible consequence after cataract surgery which you can read about here.
Nd:YAG laser posterior capsulotomy for cataracts

I was told about this possibility by the doctor after the cataract surgery but before this happened so it was no surprise. Short painless outpatient procedure.
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Old 07-07-2009, 08:22 PM   #31
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I don't feel comfortable with that.
We don't either...
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Old 07-07-2009, 11:41 PM   #32
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This stems from the recent cataract thread.
Sorry, I didn't see that.

My eye-chopper tells me I have a water cleft--which is apparently in the category of cataracts.

I will be having in Intra Ocular Implant (I think it is) later this year. When I can take time off work.

I have great expectations for it as a friend had the same procedure last year. He also tells me that it is not as miraculous as he first thought.

I gather that in about five years, some kind of scarring or other opacity will develop in the back of the envelope that holds the new lens and they will have to blast the back off with a laser. It doesn't matter. My vision in that eye is materially impaired today. I will take what I can get in the way of improvement.
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Old 07-08-2009, 12:04 AM   #33
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Another reason I would want the doctor to tell me now about the condition and how soon it will progress is that I can schedule an operation on my schedule. I have pretty good health insurance now but that may not always be the case. I would be pissed to find out later that it was something I could have done when I had good insurance but didn't, and ended up paying the full price.
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Old 07-08-2009, 12:12 AM   #34
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I guess in the older days, the patronizing expectation was that the doc knew best about what to reveal and what to hide. I don't feel comfortable with that.
I have the same feeling.

By the way, I have been told that in the Far East, Oriental doctors will not tell a patient that they are going to die (for example), but they will discuss it with the family. Of course, this is cultural, so everyone understands when this is happening.

I want it straight, and I want the right to decide for myself.
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Old 07-14-2009, 07:22 PM   #35
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I want to know everything, immediately. Unless it's something horrible, about which little can be done, and then I want to remain ignorant as long as possible.

By the way, what was that about inhaled steroids causing cataracts? I've used fluticasone about 6 months out of every 12 since 1994 - helps me cope with seasonal allergies. Nobody said anything about causing cataracts! I think I would have noticed something like that if it was mentioned in the package insert.
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Old 07-14-2009, 10:37 PM   #36
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I went to about six eye doctors before one told me the whole story: although my eyes look brown they are technically green and he could see that I was born blonde. It's good to know that.
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Old 07-15-2009, 09:43 AM   #37
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I've waited a week before voting, to think about it. If there's definitely nothing I can do, I don't want to be told until just before I'm going to notice something. For example, if I am not going to experience any symptoms at all for five years, I want four years of not knowing.

I used to be a "tell me all" person, but after some experiences with a brain tumor (DW) and bone tumor (DD), I'd do anything to avoid that experience of waking up in the morning, and suddenly remembering the bad news.

Maybe the results would be different for different scenario (more serious problem with no cure), but for me, I've learned that sometimes...

Ignorance is bliss.
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Old 07-15-2009, 01:37 PM   #38
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I'd want to know, for sure. Knowledge is power.
But I'd want it in writing. When people get bad news at the doctor's office, they often blank out.
I think of my mother who would not understand or remember the specifics, but she could show the written material to someone who could explain it to her. Fifteen minutes is not enough to explain anything, especially to someone without any background knowledge or education.
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Old 07-15-2009, 02:00 PM   #39
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I've waited a week before voting, to think about it. If there's definitely nothing I can do, I don't want to be told until just before I'm going to notice something. For example, if I am not going to experience any symptoms at all for five years, I want four years of not knowing.

I used to be a "tell me all" person, but after some experiences with a brain tumor (DW) and bone tumor (DD), I'd do anything to avoid that experience of waking up in the morning, and suddenly remembering the bad news.

Maybe the results would be different for different scenario (more serious problem with no cure), but for me, I've learned that sometimes...



Ignorance is bliss.
Thoughtful reply. In my experience, it is usually a little more complex than whether you can do something about the diagnosis or not. Rather, many people crave the knowledge for reasons of knowing their prognosis and life planning.

If I knew you had advancing cancer for which there was no treatment available, I have to assume you would want to know that so you could set your affairs in order, make peace however you needed to. Failure to disclose only to have it disclosed much later is might be perceived by patients as a betrayal, even if it didn't have material consequences. Many patients feel they have a right to know, which I sort of agree with.

Part of most physicians' education includes classes in "breaking bad news." One technique is to present the information in the most basic terms only, such as saying something like, "This is a very serious disease" and then waiting. If the patient asks more, you give more. If they don't you refrain. Sometimes they need more time, sometimes they really don't want to know.

Tough calls.


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Old 07-15-2009, 02:15 PM   #40
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for reasons of knowing their prognosis and life planning.
Right. My answer is only for something about which I can do nothing, and would not change my behavior or choices if I knew.

Let's say it were something serious -- say a genetic test that shows that in 10 years I'm going to get a serious debilitating disease which will cause a lingering death with a lot of pain. It would be nice to be ignorant of that for a few years at least, but I'd sure want to know so that I could up my withdrawal rate in that situation.

This reminds me of a friend or ours who had Huntington's Chorea in her family. She was about 25 and fine, but when genetic testing became available, she had the test done, and it showed that she would get it. She quit her job and moved, and we never saw her again. She's certainly dead by now.
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