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Old 05-08-2015, 02:04 PM   #21
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I don't know how the US or other countries stack up, but in the UK and the Netherlands, cycling proved just as safe as driving and was actually safer for 17 to 20 year old males.
Unfortunately, in many parts of the US, the roads and streets are not that bike-friendly and driver attitudes towards cyclists can be downright hostile. Some cyclists don't help matters by their brazen disregard of traffic laws.
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Old 05-08-2015, 02:27 PM   #22
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Just ordered a new full suspension mountain bike. The hard tail was beating me up on my local rugged trails, lower back especially. Ride every day unless surfing so a good mtb is going to be helpful, I think. At least that's my story.
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Old 05-08-2015, 03:12 PM   #23
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Per hour? But don't cars average must faster speeds? How about per mile, to compare biking to work versus driving (assuming a reasonably short commute)?
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Using National Travel Survey data in England for the same time period, the team converted the distance travelled by each age-group, sex and mode of transport into time spent travelling using mean trip speeds. “What we found is that risks were similar for men aged between 21 and 49 for all three modes of transport and for female pedestrians and drivers aged 21 and 69 years,” said lead author Dr Jennifer Mindell (UCL Epidemiology & Public Health).
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Unfortunately, in many parts of the US, the roads and streets are not that bike-friendly and driver attitudes towards cyclists can be downright hostile. Some cyclists don't help matters by their brazen disregard of traffic laws.
I agree, courtesy works both ways. It's a crowded world, better if we can all get along.
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Old 05-08-2015, 03:58 PM   #24
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Not sure I want to get into the safety discussion but here it goes.

1. When measured by miles driven, bicycling is a little less safe than driving. When measured by time on the road, (it takes a bike X' more time to reach the same distance) bicycling is considered more safe than driving. This is not a perfect science but it seems to be accepted based on current analysis. Here are the approximate numbers. 700 people will be killed per year in the USA. That is 14 people per state. That number has stayed fairly flat even though the number of bicyclists has shown consistent and steady growth over the last several years. It also includes kids. (and using memory) kids make up a fair proportion of those deaths. Not to say that is acceptable but child judgement can often be a problem. As the numbers point out, the more people bicycling the safer it is for bikes. The theory is with more bikes, drivers expect bikes and drive more carefully.
2. Places like the Netherlands and many other European countries are bicycle meccas. Many people bike and there are tremendous infrastructure investments to make it safe. The USA has about 325 Bicycle Friendly Communities (BFC). Bicycling in these cities are higher than those places that are not BFC mainly because they make the average person feel more comfortable about riding a bike as a consequence of infrastructure and encouragement programs.
3. The discussion about cyclists not obeying rules is a common one. For all those that believe it, start to really observe ALL people on the road, not just cyclists. Coming home from my bike ride today, drivers were driving over the speed limit on the freeway, two people turned at a red light with a no right turn sign, a car crossed two lanes to get to the left turn lane, etc. Bottom line, no one obeys many/most of the laws. The difference is that with so many cars and with a great level of experience, people know what to expect from drivers. They hesitate at fresh green lights to be sure people will not run the red. They know people will be speeding on the freeway, etc. Since there are not many bikes and most people do not bike on the roads, drivers are not sure what actions cyclists may take that are not within regulations. For example, in Idaho, they have a traffic regulation that cyclists yield at stop signs. Cyclists rarely full stop at stop signs anywhere. Since I know that, when I drive, I know what to expect from cyclists. Not that I am saying it is right. Just saying that we all obey the driving regulations in a way that makes sense to us and our vehicle. Cyclists are no different than drivers in that regard. It's not a bike problem, it's a vehicle problem in terms of all of us not really following regulations.
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Old 05-08-2015, 05:53 PM   #25
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Personally, I believe that strength training and walking are the way to go once you're done competing or doing whatever sport you want when you're younger. I once thought I wanted to be the 75 year old triathlete. Nope. Sometime after my competitive days are over (probably in my late forties) I'll switch to walking 2-3 miles a day (golf!), lifting twice a week, maintaining flexibility and an occasional intense workout (bike ride, swim, run maybe once a week or every other). I no longer believe running is good long-term as it's too hard on the joints. Cycling might be better, but having experienced trauma from crashing I won't want to be riding anything like I do now in my 50s-60s because I won't be able to recover from it as easily or completely. Swimming might be where it's at!

I am 50 and that is exactly what I presently do. Though I picked up playing a little bit too competitive tennis again recently. Next day my back was a two by four in stiffness and couldn't put any weight on either heel for like 3 hours the next morning because they were so sore...What in the hell old age thing was that? They felt fine when I went to bed...of well they recovered...weird stuff...


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Old 05-08-2015, 06:40 PM   #26
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Me too. Strength training with some low-impact aerobics thrown in. Lots of walking. Yoga. And cycling too - but only on bike paths.
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Old 05-08-2015, 11:24 PM   #27
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I am 50 and that is exactly what I presently do. Though I picked up playing a little bit too competitive tennis again recently. Next day my back was a two by four in stiffness and couldn't put any weight on either heel for like 3 hours the next morning because they were so sore...What in the hell old age thing was that? They felt fine when I went to bed...of well they recovered...weird stuff...


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Milligan, I had the same issues. The last three times I had a minor injury i.e., what felt like a pulled muscle etc., they occurred nearly two days after the exertion. Never happened to me like that when I was younger


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Old 05-09-2015, 06:14 AM   #28
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So it's hard to me to conclude that folks who are feeble today are the ones who weren't active most of their lives.
Sorry to hear this about your dad. At that age there can be many things that affect his health. Becoming feeble and losing weight seem to reinforce each other, and not in a good way. Depending on the underlying cause, it can be treated and possibly reversed.

I do not know if exercise help people remain healthier longer as we age, but it seems to me that someone who doesn't walk much at 50 or 60 will find it harder to do so at 70 or 80, while someone more active at 60 might find it easier at 75. There is little doubt that, among the population that resides in assisted living and nursing homes there is a conspicuous absence of seniors that are physically active or have the appearance of being physically fit.
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Old 05-09-2015, 08:54 AM   #29
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There is the whole correlation/causation thing of course.
I agree; my thought is that people who have no health issues, good genes and are motivated to live a healthy lifestyle are more motivated to exercise and yes, they live longer. People who are overweight, have chronic pain, who smoke or drink too much probably aren't interested in exercise.

Just to be safe, I work out nearly every day anyway.
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Old 05-09-2015, 09:34 AM   #30
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Just to be safe, I work out nearly every day anyway.
Me too, but just to hedge the risk of dying young and in shape, I drank too much last night.
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Old 05-09-2015, 06:31 PM   #31
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Whether or not exercise prolongs my life, keeping physically fit should help my quality of life.
+1. I'd MUCH rather learn how to extend my quality of life for 85 years (and suddenly drop dead while still independent and functional) than learning how to live 95 years it if only forestalls the feeble years. I didn't see anything about that in the article, just impact on longevity. Having just returned from a 4 day visit with my 93 yo parents, still living independently (barely), will do that to you...
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Old 05-09-2015, 06:32 PM   #32
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Me too, but just to hedge the risk of dying young and in shape, I drank too much last night.
Please define "too much".

Putting on a nice buzz once in a while doesn't hurt a bit, except for the hangover. Drink lots of water before sleep. Sleep a lot.
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Old 05-09-2015, 06:50 PM   #33
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A friend who does not exercise told me thus: If I exercise I can add a year to my life, but I'll spend that much time exercising. I don't like exercising so it is not worth it for me. I think he was on to something. Many of us who exercise, actually like exercising. Others don't and maybe they are rational.
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Old 05-09-2015, 07:00 PM   #34
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A friend who does not exercise told me thus: If I exercise I can add a year to my life, but I'll spend that much time exercising. I don't like exercising so it is not worth it for me. I think he was on to something. Many of us who exercise, actually like exercising. Others don't and maybe they are rational.
If it were a digital result I might agree. Both my parents had strokes and were messed up for years before they actually died.
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Old 05-09-2015, 07:19 PM   #35
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One of the biggest problems people encounter when the become old old is falling and breaking something. If you do the right exercises and activities at the appropriate level for your age and fitness then you might avoid premature death as a result of falling.

I'm interested in quality of life much more than length of life. Good balance and strength should improve quality of life. However, if you are going to resist and be miserable if you exercise even a little bit then that is the life you choose.
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Old 05-09-2015, 09:00 PM   #36
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I love swimming. I swam 1800-2000 meters 4-5 times per week through med school and beyond. It's like a meditation, and one is always working on technique with each stroke. 10 years ago I stopped swimming, as gym membership cost was high and I was too busy to go. I go to the cheap gym and do weights, but aerobic exercise is boring. We're purchasing a swim spa this summer and I'll be able to swim, even in the winter, without the hassle of driving to the gym. Traveling last week I was able to swim laps for the first time in 10 years. Did 1000 meters the firs day, then 1800 meters the next two days. I'm really excited about swimming. Add some weights to my routine and I'll get both strength and aerobic capacity.

My dad never exercised and became more and more frail with many health problems. His last 6 years were spent dealing with multiple health problems and little else. I don't want that to happen to me, but if it does, I won't have regrets because I am trying to stay in shape, even with all the aches and pains.


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Old 05-09-2015, 09:15 PM   #37
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Personally, I believe that strength training and walking are the way to go once you're done competing or doing whatever sport you want when you're younger. I once thought I wanted to be the 75 year old triathlete. Nope. Sometime after my competitive days are over (probably in my late forties) I'll switch to walking 2-3 miles a day (golf!), lifting twice a week, maintaining flexibility and an occasional intense workout (bike ride, swim, run maybe once a week or every other). I no longer believe running is good long-term as it's too hard on the joints. Cycling might be better, but having experienced trauma from crashing I won't want to be riding anything like I do now in my 50s-60s because I won't be able to recover from it as easily or completely. Swimming might be where it's at!
Are you having joint issues now? It's not a given that running will cause joint problems. I'm 53 and I put in a lot of 50-60+ mile weeks this spring and ran a 100 with little issue. It helps that the race and most training was on dirt roads or trails, mostly non-technical, but I still do some road marathons too. If you're having issues now it'll probably get worse, but if you aren't, don't assume you will. I may be wrong about that, so do what you think is right, but I have no plans to stop running competitively.
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Old 05-09-2015, 09:45 PM   #38
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One of the biggest problems people encounter when the become old old is falling and breaking something. If you do the right exercises and activities at the appropriate level for your age and fitness then you might avoid premature death as a result of falling.

I'm interested in quality of life much more than length of life. Good balance and strength should improve quality of life. However, if you are going to resist and be miserable if you exercise even a little bit then that is the life you choose.
This is soo true and exactly how I see it. I would rather feel well and drop dead suddenly while mowing my lawn on a nice bright summer's day even if it's next summer rather that be like my mother who's 86 and in a nursing home. She hasn't been able to get around or be independent in years and can't see or hear well. What's the point.

I want to be the old guy who doesn't fall down in the first place, and if I do fall, I want to be able to get up instead of pushing that button hoping dispatch gets the message.
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Old 05-09-2015, 10:02 PM   #39
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My dad is feeble. He got quite a bit of exercise until about 75. He used to jog several times a week until then. Then difficulty with his feet and joints set him back. He has difficulty walking now. He believes that he way overdid it with the running/jogging over decades. I think he has some serious arthritis issues.

He is quite frail and slow moving now in his mid-80s. He was never overweight, but now he is definitely underweight.

He's finally worked up to walking outside around the house six times. So he's trying.

So it's hard to me to conclude that folks who are feeble today are the ones who weren't active most of their lives.
A lifetime of jogging is horrible for your body.

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Old 05-09-2015, 10:19 PM   #40
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This is soo true and exactly how I see it. I would rather feel well and drop dead suddenly while mowing my lawn on a nice bright summer's day even if it's next summer rather that be like my mother who's 86 and in a nursing home. She hasn't been able to get around or be independent in years and can't see or hear well. What's the point.

I want to be the old guy who doesn't fall down in the first place, and if I do fall, I want to be able to get up instead of pushing that button hoping dispatch gets the message.

Monday I will be going with my neighbor golfing for 18 holes with a bunch of other seniors. We are both seniors but he is 37 years older than me. He is 87 years old and he insisted on driving the 100 mile round trip to the course. Ya, I wanna be like him if possible.


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