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The Right Dose of Exercise for a Longer Life
Old 05-08-2015, 04:57 AM   #1
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The Right Dose of Exercise for a Longer Life

Yet more studies on exercise and longevity summarized in the NY Times:
http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2015/0...WCARETARG&_r=0

People who exercised moderately for 150 mins per week had a 31% lower chance of dying during the 14 year study versus the non-exercising people.

Triple that to 450 mins - best odds - 39% lower chance.

30% of exercise being vigorous improved odds 13%.

Recommendations - min 150 mins per week with 20 to 30 being vigorous.

I confess this showed up in my Facebook feed.
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Old 05-08-2015, 05:30 AM   #2
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Interesting link, thanks.
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Old 05-08-2015, 07:10 AM   #3
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There is the whole correlation/causation thing of course.
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Old 05-08-2015, 07:45 AM   #4
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There is the whole correlation/causation thing of course.
Yes. On the other hand, I've visited 4 assisted living facilities this week. What stands out about so many residents is not that they are old or infirm, but that they are feeble. Getting regular exercise should enable you to take better care of yourself and not have to rely on others.
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Old 05-08-2015, 07:51 AM   #5
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Whether or not exercise prolongs my life, keeping physically fit should help my quality of life.
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Old 05-08-2015, 08:07 AM   #6
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Yes. On the other hand, I've visited 4 assisted living facilities this week. What stands out about so many residents is not that they are old or infirm, but that they are feeble. Getting regular exercise should enable you to take better care of yourself and not have to rely on others.
My dad is feeble. He got quite a bit of exercise until about 75. He used to jog several times a week until then. Then difficulty with his feet and joints set him back. He has difficulty walking now. He believes that he way overdid it with the running/jogging over decades. I think he has some serious arthritis issues.

He is quite frail and slow moving now in his mid-80s. He was never overweight, but now he is definitely underweight.

He's finally worked up to walking outside around the house six times. So he's trying.

So it's hard to me to conclude that folks who are feeble today are the ones who weren't active most of their lives.
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Old 05-08-2015, 08:25 AM   #7
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For me, adding bicycling as a commuting alternative (leave the car at home), allows me to easily meet these goals. For example, yesterday, DW and I rode to the mall in order to return an item. Along the way, we ran a couple of errands. With the advantage of being retired, time was not critical for this 12 mile round trip. With all the stops, it took about 90 minutes. I expect in the car, it would have been at least 45 minutes, so really not much more time.

I do not ride my bike all the time but before I take the car, I reject riding the bike. Not the other way around.

I know for physical reasons/other, the bike is not an alternative for everyone. But, if there is a concern about traffic, hills, etc. with some training from experienced cyclists, bike stores, bike clubs, online guides for safe riding (many exist), everyone can negotiate traffic/roads that were originally designed just for cars. Confident and trained cyclist can safely share the road with cars in most communities. In those communities that have made the investment toward a Bicycle Friendly Community, many resources are in place and makes the transition from driver to cyclist much easier.

As you can tell, I am a big bike enthusiast. I ride many miles but started like most people being a bit fearful and not in the best of shape. I expect that there is hardly a road (or reaching a location) most/all people would not negotiate in their car. In time, your bicycling experience will be equal to your driving experience.

I guess I am suggesting to give it a try, build your experience/confidence. When that happens, you will find the bicycle being your first choice for many of the events that require commuting vs your car.
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Old 05-08-2015, 08:48 AM   #8
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As I get older, I'm realizing that strength training is at least as important as cardio exercise. When an unfit/weak/feeble person has an accident, they tend to break something and spend a lot of time recovering, and often are never the same as they were before. When a strong/fit person has an accident, they are much much more likely to bounce back up with just some scratches, and even if they are injured, they tend to recover more quickly and fully.
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Old 05-08-2015, 08:50 AM   #9
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Originally Posted by Philliefan33 View Post
Whether or not exercise prolongs my life, keeping physically fit should help my quality of life.
+1

I would rather die fit at 85, than be old and decrepit from 80 to 90.

OTOH, I heard an interview on NPR this morning with a WW2 vet. He sounded mentally sharp. Especially considering that he was 109.
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Old 05-08-2015, 08:53 AM   #10
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As I get older, I'm realizing that strength training is at least as important as cardio exercise. When an unfit/weak/feeble person has an accident, they tend to break something and spend a lot of time recovering, and often are never the same as they were before. When a strong/fit person has an accident, they are much much more likely to bounce back up with just some scratches, and even if they are injured, they tend to recover more quickly and fully.
+1
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Old 05-08-2015, 08:53 AM   #11
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Yes. On the other hand, I've visited 4 assisted living facilities this week. What stands out about so many residents is not that they are old or infirm, but that they are feeble. Getting regular exercise should enable you to take better care of yourself and not have to rely on others.
This is one of the main reasons why I go to the gym. Lots of women seem to become really feeble in their later years, and living alone, I don't want to be in that position if I can avoid it. I love weightlifting at the gym, and the house I am purchasing is in a very walkable neighborhood so I am hoping to walk more after I move there.

If I still become feeble, despite the gym and despite walking a little more, I'll probably have to move to assisted living. Being the INTJ that I am, I'd really rather just live out my life at home.
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Old 05-08-2015, 09:20 AM   #12
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Getting feeble both physically and mentally would be really scary
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Old 05-08-2015, 09:28 AM   #13
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One of the first things I did when I ER'd was hook up with a trainer and join a gym. However, my goal is to train for everyday living. I'm not training for maximum strength or speed, for a sport, or to recover from an injury. You can get to a good place physically with moderate consistent exercise. We have a couple of women over 80 in my class at the gym.
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Old 05-08-2015, 12:00 PM   #14
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Dying is easy. Living is a pain in the butt. It's like an athletic event. You've got to train for it. You've got to eat right. You've got to exercise. Your health account, your bank account, they're the same thing. The more you put in, the more you can take out. Exercise is king and nutrition is queen: together, you have a kingdom. - Jack Lalanne
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Old 05-08-2015, 12:09 PM   #15
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For me it's a treadmill.......don't have to worry about rain or snow, don't have to spend time driving to a gym.......just get up every morning and then just before dinner walk on a treadmill in front of a TV for about 285 minutes a week. Since I started this 10 years ago I've lost weight, feel great and combined with a lot of veggies and salads I'm in much better health than I was earlier in my life.
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Old 05-08-2015, 12:19 PM   #16
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This is part of why I go to the gym 3 - 4 times a week. While I could (and did) exercise at home I find the gym provides a greater incentive. Can't say I know why, other than that since I paid for it I then "have" to get my money's worth. It gets me out of the house on days I otherwise wouldn't go out and we find that prodding each other keeps it up too.

Neither is trying to maximize strength or anything, just maintain general fitness.
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Old 05-08-2015, 12:29 PM   #17
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I know for physical reasons/other, the bike is not an alternative for everyone. But, if there is a concern about traffic, hills, etc. with some training from experienced cyclists, bike stores, bike clubs, online guides for safe riding (many exist), everyone can negotiate traffic/roads that were originally designed just for cars. Confident and trained cyclist can safely share the road with cars in most communities. In those communities that have made the investment toward a Bicycle Friendly Community, many resources are in place and makes the transition from driver to cyclist much easier.
I don't know how the US or other countries stack up, but in the UK and the Netherlands, cycling proved just as safe as driving and was actually safer for 17 to 20 year old males.

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Researchers from UCL have found that cycling is safer than driving for young males, with 17 to 20 year old drivers facing almost five times greater risk per hour than cyclists of the same age.
Cycling safer than driving for young people
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Old 05-08-2015, 01:13 PM   #18
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I don't know how the US or other countries stack up, but in the UK and the Netherlands, cycling proved just as safe as driving and was actually safer for 17 to 20 year old males.

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Researchers from UCL have found that cycling is safer than driving for young males, with 17 to 20 year old drivers facing almost five times greater risk per hour than cyclists of the same age.
Cycling safer than driving for young people
Per hour? But don't cars average must faster speeds? How about per mile, to compare biking to work versus driving (assuming a reasonably short commute)?

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Old 05-08-2015, 01:25 PM   #19
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This is part of why I go to the gym 3 - 4 times a week. While I could (and did) exercise at home I find the gym provides a greater incentive. Can't say I know why, other than that since I paid for it I then "have" to get my money's worth. It gets me out of the house on days I otherwise wouldn't go out and we find that prodding each other keeps it up too.

Neither is trying to maximize strength or anything, just maintain general fitness.
It's the same with me. I need to get out of the house to really get a good workout. Also, I joined the local University gym and I take a class for strength training for members over 50 yrs old. I get access to a trainer and some equipment I wouldn't otherwise have access to. And there are nice people there to meet and talk to.
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Old 05-08-2015, 01:37 PM   #20
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Personally, I believe that strength training and walking are the way to go once you're done competing or doing whatever sport you want when you're younger. I once thought I wanted to be the 75 year old triathlete. Nope. Sometime after my competitive days are over (probably in my late forties) I'll switch to walking 2-3 miles a day (golf!), lifting twice a week, maintaining flexibility and an occasional intense workout (bike ride, swim, run maybe once a week or every other). I no longer believe running is good long-term as it's too hard on the joints. Cycling might be better, but having experienced trauma from crashing I won't want to be riding anything like I do now in my 50s-60s because I won't be able to recover from it as easily or completely. Swimming might be where it's at!
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