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Old 03-14-2016, 09:13 PM   #21
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My sister wrote to me to tell me she was diagnosed with essential tremors in her hands by a neurologist last week. She too was worried about Parkinson's, but they ruled that out. She will turn 59 next week. I can't imagine how this will affect her at w#rk - she w#rks as a very high level admin assistant, and is on the computer all day.

Interesting previous post about the connection to lithium. My sister has been on meds for bipolar depression for decades.
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Old 03-15-2016, 08:19 AM   #22
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I have had a familial/essential tremor all my life. It is hereditary, dad has it, brother has it.
It was less pronounced, but still noticeable when I was younger.

Mine gets augmented depending upon the weight of the object I am holding. For example, if I am holding a 12oz glass, my tremor is less noticeable.
If I am holding a 4oz Dixie cup, whatever is in the glass will soon be all over the floor unless I am holding the cup with both hands.

When I drink, the tremor subsides, so when I'm drunk, I'm steady as a rock

There are drugs I can take, but the side affects aren't worth it.
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Old 03-15-2016, 02:24 PM   #23
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Apparently, the hand-tremor condition is hereditary. Carson, the head butler of Downton Abbey had it as did his father and grandfather. It became so prevalent, that Carson could no longer pour the wine for his employers at dinner (and lunch and breakfast and other times as well). He was forced into retirement, but did receive a pension from the Downton Abbey estate.
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Trembling hands
Old 03-15-2016, 02:28 PM   #24
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Trembling hands

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Apparently, the hand-tremor condition is hereditary. Carson, the head butler of Downton Abbey had it as did his father and grandfather. It became so prevalent, that Carson could no longer pour the wine for his employers at dinner (and lunch and breakfast and times in between). He was forced into retirement, but did receive a pension from the Downton Abbey estate.

I'm still able to pour wine and scotch...but holding a glass with one hand can be messy. Carrying a tray of drinks would be a disaster!
Id be let go without a reference!


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Old 03-15-2016, 02:34 PM   #25
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I'm still able to pour wine and scotch..

Well, at least you've got the essentials covered!!
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Old 03-15-2016, 04:49 PM   #26
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Trembling hands

My dad had tremor hands but never had Parkinson's, my nanny had Parkinson's but never had tremor hands. She couldn't moved her legs until she took some medicine to control it.


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Old 03-15-2016, 10:15 PM   #27
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Maybe this will give hope to those of the Trembling Hands

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Old 03-16-2016, 08:24 AM   #28
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Magnesium deficiency is said to be a possible cause of tremors. Easy enough to up your intake with supplements or soothing Epson salt soaks.
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Old 03-16-2016, 08:59 AM   #29
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Magnesium deficiency is said to be a possible cause of tremors. Easy enough to up your intake with supplements or soothing Epson salt soaks.

I know I was screened by my neurologist for all sorts of things, including mineral and vitamin deficiencies...nothing was found other than a B-12 and vitamin D problem that I was already being treated for. She believes I inherited the tremors. I quit diagnosing on the Internet a long time ago.


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Old 03-16-2016, 09:19 AM   #30
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There are a very large set of causes of tremors.
As such, there is no silver bullet.
My tremor was known about since before I was ten, and diagnosed by doctors for the first time 30 years ago.

Some tremors might be due to a magnesium deficiency, but certainly not all.
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Old 03-18-2016, 06:16 PM   #31
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My brother started to have hand tremors. He also had very small handwriting and a shuffling walk. Turned out he was diagnosed with Parkinson's.
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Old 04-13-2016, 05:16 PM   #32
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Hi all,

I'm new here and have a little info to add to this thread. The men in my family all suffer from Essential Tremor aka Inherited Tremor. I'm 57 and am just beginning to notice it in my hands when I'm under stress. My father, who died last year at 87 had it so bad he couldn't read his own handwriting and had great difficulty eating, shaving, brushing his teeth or putting a key in a lock. For a while, in FLA, he was getting Botox injections in his forearms to reduce it, but when I moved him away he couldn't get those shots anymore.

The thing that really helped him was an operation called Deep Brain Stimulation, or DBS. This involves implanting probes in the brain and battery packs in the upper chest. The battery pack actually sends signals to the probe in the brain to quell the tremors. There's a target area in the brain for ET, another for Parkinson's another for epilepsy, etc. They implant one probe on the right side of the brain for tremors in the left hand and another probe on the left side for the right hand. The patient is semi-awake during this stage of the operation so the neurosurgeons can verify the probe placement. After getting the operation at USC, my father could sign his name better than he had in 30 years! It was incredible.

The battery pack was made by Medtronic. Every 5 years or so they need to go back in to replace it when the battery runs low. They program it wirelessly to send out different kinds of signals and different amplitudes to find the most effective settings.

This was all done via Medicare when my father was in his 80's. If you suffer from this ailment and don't like drug side-effects you should check into this.

Best regards,
Bruceski
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Old 04-13-2016, 05:30 PM   #33
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Hi all,.... It was incredible.

The battery pack was made by Medtronic. Every 5 years or so they need to go back in to replace it when the battery runs low. They program it wirelessly to send out different kinds of signals and different amplitudes to find the most effective settings.

This was all done via Medicare when my father was in his 80's. If you suffer from this ailment and don't like drug side-effects you should check into this.

Best regards,
Bruceski
I wear a Medtronics unit under my chest skin, though not for essential tremor. I'm really hoping the next time it gets swapped out it will come with a music player, a bunch of extra memory, and some nifty apps. A new memory/brain interface and some memory I could count on? Psht. Cyborg me up!
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Old 04-14-2016, 11:49 AM   #34
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For now I'll stick to clonazapam. My writing is unreadable, but computers and iPhones reduce a lot of need for writing. Eating I can do with the medication. If it gets worse it's good to know there is a surgical operation, but at 59 I try to avoid surgery unless there are no there are no other options. Too many things can go wrong.


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