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Old 08-29-2010, 10:06 PM   #41
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One more question - any opinions on oatmeal and oat cereals? Lots seem to think it's good for lowering cholesterol (at least the commericals for these products indicate this - and we all know we can trust commercial messages).
Avoid the instant and quick cook oats - those are like refined starches and can raise blood sugar levels quickly. Some folks use the steel cut oats which are much slower to digest. In general the soluble fiber in oats helps slow digestion, which helps slow release of sugars into the blood stream, but it's best to eat only the most whole grain form like steel cut.

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Old 08-29-2010, 11:23 PM   #42
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In my store steel cut oats are $5.79 and old fashioned oats are $1.75.

I've been craving oatmeal lately, maybe I'll try the steel cut oats and see if I like them $4 more than the old fashioned.
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Old 08-30-2010, 07:25 AM   #43
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In my store steel cut oats are $5.79 and old fashioned oats are $1.75.

I've been craving oatmeal lately, maybe I'll try the steel cut oats and see if I like them $4 more than the old fashioned.
You can find them for $3 a box instead of the pricey cans. And there are non-imported brands than are less.

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Old 08-30-2010, 08:04 AM   #44
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A prescription form of omega fatty acids exist (Lovaza), but OTC omega concentrates seem to be just as effective.
Dr Davis agrees:
http://heartscanblog.blogspot.com/2010/07/no-more-lovaza.html
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Old 08-30-2010, 09:47 AM   #45
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I'm guessing you eat bison instead of beef because it's lower in fat.
That’s probably why we started, but we’ve been eating it so long that we prefer it to beef.

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We also do brown rice and whole wheat breads and pastas - if you hang onto some carbs, I suspect it's better than foods made from white flour or white rice.
I still enjoy the taste of semolina (but eat very little), but I always preferred brown rice over white. So does my 16 months old granddaughter.

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You can find them for $3 a box instead of the pricey cans. And there are non-imported brands than are less.
Don’t they also sell oats in bulk for less at Whole Foods?
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Old 08-30-2010, 10:57 AM   #46
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That’s probably why we started, but we’ve been eating it so long that we prefer it to beef.

I still enjoy the taste of semolina (but eat very little), but I always preferred brown rice over white. So does my 16 months old granddaughter.

Don’t they also sell oats in bulk for less at Whole Foods?
Grass-fed beef has a better O6:O3 ratio. Fat has gotten a bad rap...
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Old 08-30-2010, 04:07 PM   #47
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Avoid the instant and quick cook oats - those are like refined starches and can raise blood sugar levels quickly. Some folks use the steel cut oats which are much slower to digest. In general the soluble fiber in oats helps slow digestion, which helps slow release of sugars into the blood stream, but it's best to eat only the most whole grain form like steel cut.

Audrey
The instant sometimes contain added sugar, so I'd agree to watch out for that regarding glycemic index.

But the rest are just variations in cutting, rolling, and maybe some heating in the process. I'm pretty sure that these are treated the same by our body. Cutting something smaller, or rolling it flat to make it cook faster, or pre-cooking it a bit would all be the same to our system, I would think.

Quaker Oats had this:
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All forms of Quaker® Oats, including Steel Cut, Old Fashioned, Quick, and Instant Oats are whole grains. That means they are equally nutritious because they supply all parts of the oat grain including the bran, endosperm and germ. The different size and shape of the oats only affects the cooking time and texture.
I did see a site that said there was a difference, but they also had some info I knew to be wrong - I'd need to see it from a trusted site, and I'd be curious as to the explanation if it is true.

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Old 08-30-2010, 06:35 PM   #48
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Its possible he suffers from "Metabolic syndrome".

Metabolic Syndrome
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Old 08-30-2010, 07:07 PM   #49
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My triglycerides peaked at just under 1200 (Yes 1200) about 23 years ago. I've been on meds ever since. But it wasn't until a combo of Niacin, Fish Oil and very low carbs that things finally came under control. I don't recall the last triglyceride number but total Cholesterol just came in at 111, on a steady diet of meats, cheeses, eggs, nuts and veggies. So I'm sold on low carb.
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Old 08-30-2010, 07:19 PM   #50
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The instant sometimes contain added sugar, so I'd agree to watch out for that regarding glycemic index.

But the rest are just variations in cutting, rolling, and maybe some heating in the process. I'm pretty sure that these are treated the same by our body. Cutting something smaller, or rolling it flat to make it cook faster, or pre-cooking it a bit would all be the same to our system, I would think.

Quaker Oats had this:


I did see a site that said there was a difference, but they also had some info I knew to be wrong - I'd need to see it from a trusted site, and I'd be curious as to the explanation if it is true.

-ERD50
I think the reference I have is Sandra Woodruff's book - not online. But the processing DOES matter. The Good Carb Cookbook: Secrets of ... - Google Books

How quickly food digests does directly affect the GI - the speed of release of sugar into the bloodstream. The more surface area exposed to the stomach (like flattened rolled oats compared to cut groats) the more quickly food is digested. In general, the less processed a food is from it's original whole form, the lower the GI.

The carbohydrate load is the same, the amount of calories is the same, but the speed of release of the sugar into the bloodstream is different, and this is what affects the body's insulin response.

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Old 08-30-2010, 07:20 PM   #51
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You know, I am kind of tickled that many of us here are on the same page with low-carb (at least with avoidance of empty starches) although I don't adhere to it as much as I should.

The thing is, nobody listened to me only 10 years ago when I found the better way of eating, including my diabetic friend (type2) who ate tons of white rice while avoiding fats like the plague...(That must have been the standard "healthy eating" then and it still is to a certain extent.) I guess things have turned around a bit (or people on this forum are better informed than the average...doctors.)
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Old 08-30-2010, 11:29 PM   #52
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The thing is, nobody listened to me only 10 years ago when I found the better way of eating, including my diabetic friend (type2) who ate tons of white rice while avoiding fats like the plague...(That must have been the standard "healthy eating" then and it still is to a certain extent.) I guess things have turned around a bit (or people on this forum are better informed than the average...doctors.)
I think this is still the ADA recommended diet for diabetes. My old roomate has diabetes, good insurance, lots of doctoring, but he eats the usual low fat diet (and necessarily high carb since you have to eat something). Poor guy no longer can feel where his feet are.

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Old 08-31-2010, 08:03 AM   #53
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I think this is still the ADA recommended diet for diabetes. My old roomate has diabetes, good insurance, lots of doctoring, but he eats the usual low fat diet (and necessarily high carb since you have to eat something). Poor guy no longer can feel where his feet are.

Ha
Mother was insulin dependent diabetic the last ~30 years of her life. I watched her stuff down all those refined carbs and she tried to tell me that I should be on the high-carb diabetic diet so I could lose weight.
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Old 08-31-2010, 08:20 AM   #54
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The carbohydrate load is the same, the amount of calories is the same, but the speed of release of the sugar into the bloodstream is different, and this is what affects the body's insulin response.

Audrey
OK thanks, I googled a few refs on this, most seem to indicate the steel cut have a GI of 42, and the rolled from 55-66 at different sources.

The reason I'm so skeptical is that while the steel cut are chopped and are thicker than rolled, they are cooked longer to compensate for this. They are both pretty 'mushy' after cooking. And we chew our food, I would think it would be pretty similar once it hits the stomach. But I guess the GI are taken from actual tests on humans, so if that test is really reflective (there are some skeptics on that end also - is two hours the 'right time'?), then I guess it does make some difference.

I actually like the steel cut, just never got into a good routine for getting it cooked for breakfast (boil the night before and let it sit covered and reheat the next AM worked OK though).

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Old 08-31-2010, 08:21 AM   #55
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Mother was insulin dependent diabetic the last ~30 years of her life. I watched her stuff down all those refined carbs and she tried to tell me that I should be on the high-carb diabetic diet so I could lose weight.
IIRC, the ADA wants you to stay away from refined carbs, but they do push complex carbs.

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Old 08-31-2010, 08:40 AM   #56
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IIRC, the ADA wants you to stay away from refined carbs, but they do push complex carbs.

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Hey, I thought Wonder Bread "builds strong bodies 12 ways".

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Old 08-31-2010, 08:47 AM   #57
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The problem with oatmeal isn't so much "rolled v. steel-cut", it's all the brown sugar I add. I add lots of "good" fat, though, in the form of butter...
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Old 08-31-2010, 09:25 AM   #58
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Mother was insulin dependent diabetic the last ~30 years of her life. I watched her stuff down all those refined carbs and she tried to tell me that I should be on the high-carb diabetic diet so I could lose weight.
I was diagnosed as a T2 a bit over ten years ago (complements of the U.S. government, but that's another story).

As part of my management plan, I had to take an 8-hour course at a local hospital to inform/teach me how to manage the situation. Even back then, they preached the idea of a low carb diet, as later accepted by the ADA:

http://www.diabeteshealth.com/read/2008/12/29/6033/ada-2009-recommendations-reaffirm-acceptance-of-low-carb-diet/

The problem with a high-fat (rather than high carb) diet for a diabetic is that you are in the same situation as one who has already had a heart attack:

http://www.newsroom.heart.org/index.php?s=43&item=380

So it is a constant balancing act to manage your diabetes (mainly T2, since T1 does not have all the dietary restrictions) by watching everything you eat.

I've been lucky to manage mine for more than a decade by diet/exercise. While my numbers (e.g. A1C) is increasing gradually, I know I'll have to go to meds, and maybe on to insulin in the future (hey, pills/needles don't bother me, and I'll get in increase in my VA disability).

Just my story...
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Old 08-31-2010, 09:49 AM   #59
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The problem with a high-fat (rather than high carb) diet for a diabetic is that you are in the same situation as one who has already had a heart attack:

http://www.newsroom.heart.org/index.php?s=43&item=380
Rescueme, maybe a vitamin B1 supplement can help protect against these cardiovascular risks:

BBC NEWS | Health | Diabetes problems 'vitamin link'

http://www.ingentaconnect.com/conten...64512a75d892a8

(this is no medical advice; I know nothing; newer research may have invalidated my supposition)
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Old 08-31-2010, 10:12 AM   #60
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I was diagnosed as a T2 a bit over ten years ago (complements of the U.S. government, but that's another story).

As part of my management plan, I had to take an 8-hour course at a local hospital to inform/teach me how to manage the situation. Even back then, they preached the idea of a low carb diet, as later accepted by the ADA:

http://www.diabeteshealth.com/read/2...low-carb-diet/
"The current edition reaffirms the ADA's landmark decision in 2008 to accept low carbohydrate diets as one method people with diabetes can use to lose weight in the short term (up to one year).

Previously, the ADA, as well as many other public health organizations, had recommended low fat diets that precluded any more than very light consumption of red meat, eggs, dairy products, and other high protein, high fat foods. Because diabetes increases the risk of cardiovascular disease, the concern was that a high fat intake could lead to arterial plaque and other vascular obstructions."

It appears from this piece that you cited above that the ADA in 2008 decided it was OK for diabetics to use carefully monitored low carb diet for up to one year, for the purpose of losing weight.

So I would say that your training in 2000 was not mainline ADA, and that mainline ADA even in 2010 is not low carb as the preferred diabetes control diet, but carefully monitored low carb for a short period for the purpose of losing weight.

Ha
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