Join Early Retirement Today
Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 12-06-2014, 08:37 AM   #21
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
travelover's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Posts: 9,896
I use the dishwasher. With apples, if you use the dry cycle they come out nicely cooked.
__________________

__________________
Yes, I have achieved work / life balance.
travelover is offline   Reply With Quote
Join the #1 Early Retirement and Financial Independence Forum Today - It's Totally Free!

Are you planning to be financially independent as early as possible so you can live life on your own terms? Discuss successful investing strategies, asset allocation models, tax strategies and other related topics in our online forum community. Our members range from young folks just starting their journey to financial independence, military retirees and even multimillionaires. No matter where you fit in you'll find that Early-Retirement.org is a great community to join. Best of all it's totally FREE!

You are currently viewing our boards as a guest so you have limited access to our community. Please take the time to register and you will gain a lot of great new features including; the ability to participate in discussions, network with our members, see fewer ads, upload photographs, create a retirement blog, send private messages and so much, much more!

Old 12-06-2014, 09:23 AM   #22
Full time employment: Posting here.
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Posts: 925
Quote:
Originally Posted by travelover View Post
I use the dishwasher. With apples, if use the dry cycle they come out nicely cooked.
Apparently Alton Brown does use his washing machine for greens: Why is Alton Brown putting lettuce in the washer/? - thenest

At the very least, he thought the idea made for good TV.
__________________

__________________
If there's one thing in my life that's missing; It's the time I spend alone
Sailing on the cool and bright clear waters; There's lots of those friendly people
Showin me ways to go; And I never want to lose your inspiration
CoolChange is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-06-2014, 09:34 AM   #23
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Location: Toronto
Posts: 1,417
I thought Cosmo Kramer had a great idea when he was preparing everything in the shower.
__________________
6miths is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-06-2014, 09:40 AM   #24
Recycles dryer sheets
Theseus's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2013
Posts: 484
Quote:
Originally Posted by LOL! View Post
I often eat wild mulberries, strawberries, and blackberries right when I pick them without washing. I blow off most of the bugs and just eat the rest.
Hand picked and devoured immediately, best stuff in the world!

Quote:
Originally Posted by LOL! View Post
As for germs, I want my immune system to be continually challenged in small ways, so that when a larger challenge occurs that I am ready.
+1, but with this caveat... sickness and/or fatalities from food-borne illness tend to impact rather specific populations, those with compromised immune systems, or frail elderly, etc. and that kind of thing makes headlines. It is very bad for business for megafoodcorp to make those kinds of headlines. Unfortunately those things do happen, and that has led to society as a whole being more aware of food-borne illness. I tend to look at in a historical perspective -- before we had megafoodcorps and lawyers aplenty -- people dying off from foodborne illnesses were the result of scattered incidences not readily assignable to a root cause on some else's part. If the farmer/consumer messed up and contaminated his own family's food, it was as simple as that. If something goes awry in today's megafoodcorp process or distributions it could affect thousands of homes. If, for instance we somehow returned to the farmer/consumer mode, more people would be impacted by random, scattered incidents as all of those individual "producers" would be all over the map in terms of adherence to sanitary food handling during processing. But would that make the headlines? Or would we all go on thinking everything was just fine?

Quote:
Originally Posted by LOL! View Post
If something falls on the floor, I have 5 minute rule instead of a 5 second rule.
The cat has first dibs on that stuff
__________________
Theseus is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-06-2014, 10:43 AM   #25
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
MooreBonds's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: St. Louis
Posts: 2,091
As another poster mentioned, the level of pesticide and other chemical use in the 1910s/1930s, even perhaps the early 1950s was presumably much lower than today. So when I hear people say "my grandparents lived to their 80s, and they ate everything that didn't bite them back, so I don't worry", I can't necessarily say that they're comparing the same conditions back them to how things are now.

I am not a chemist or farmer, and I don't know the life-cycles of various chemicals that farmers use, but for safety's sake, I typically peel all veggies and fruits that have a skin, except potatoes (I'll admit to eating the skins on sweet potatoes and brown potatoes), and give them a rinse before I do. In addition to rinsing lettuce and other products (like strawberries, celery, etc.) that don't have a skin. I haven't thought about some of the ideas here (like a vinegar wash for fruits), but will look more into it now that people have mentioned it.

Is there any specific evidence or research people have seen that suggests one specific type of wash over another to remove pesticides? (i.e. vinegar and water, versus diluted dish soap, etc.)
__________________
Dryer sheets Schmyer sheets
MooreBonds is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-06-2014, 12:00 PM   #26
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
Live And Learn's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: Tampa Bay Area
Posts: 1,689
I give everything a good rinse buy you guys are scaring me enough that I may start doing more ! DH doesn't rinse anything despite my repeated attempts to gross-him-out into doing it
__________________
"For the time being no discipline brings joy, but seems grievous and painful; but afterwards it yields a peaceable fruit of righteousness to those who have been trained by it." ~
Hebrews 12:11

ER'd in June 2015 at age 52. Initial WR 3%. 50/40/10 (Equity/Bond/Short Term) AA.
Live And Learn is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-06-2014, 12:10 PM   #27
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Posts: 8,625
It is amusing that folks wash a bunch of germs off things, then they go looking to buy germs in the form of probiotics to eat. Then there are prebiotics which sound like probiotics.

I would guess that ingesting soap & detergent was just as bad as ingesting pesticides. Vinegar is OK, but what else is in that acetic acid?
__________________
LOL! is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-06-2014, 12:45 PM   #28
Full time employment: Posting here.
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Posts: 925
Quote:
Originally Posted by MooreBonds View Post
....
Is there any specific evidence or research people have seen that suggests one specific type of wash over another to remove pesticides? (i.e. vinegar and water, versus diluted dish soap, etc.)
I did a bit of poking around on the 'net looking for just this before starting this thread; but, I did not find anything useful amongst all the noise. Honestly, I was hoping someone from this esteemed group would post exactly what you are asking about.

Note: I did find some very positive pages with regard to using a vinegar & water wash for disinfecting produce, enough to convince me this is useful.

Quote:
Originally Posted by LOL! View Post
....
I would guess that ingesting soap & detergent was just as bad as ingesting pesticides. Vinegar is OK, but what else is in that acetic acid?
This is part of the reason I do not do more at this point; although, I am already inclined to start using a vinegar wash rather than just tap water.

I am also hoping to hear from some folks living in less developed areas of the world on this subject. When I first started traveling to Mexico, 20+ years ago, it seemed that almost everyone was washing produce in either a bleach and water solution or one made with some kind of silver compound, both very diluted. Now, it seems that almost no one is doing this; but, I do not know why:
  • Better general sanitation
  • Preventative worse than risk
  • Other
This is another area where I would welcome any actual evidence.
__________________
If there's one thing in my life that's missing; It's the time I spend alone
Sailing on the cool and bright clear waters; There's lots of those friendly people
Showin me ways to go; And I never want to lose your inspiration
CoolChange is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-06-2014, 12:53 PM   #29
Moderator Emeritus
Bestwifeever's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Posts: 16,375
Pretty lackadaisical when it's just DH and me, lightly rinsing off only stuff that we don't peel. Superclean when we have company over for dinner, though. I do rub mushrooms with a dry paper towel to get whatever that black stuff is off.

My grown kids wash all produce (which they buy only organic anyway), peeled or not, in some fancy soap before serving to our grandkids. I probably would too if I were a young parent today.
__________________
“Would you like an adventure now, or would you like to have your tea first?” J.M. Barrie, Peter Pan
Bestwifeever is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-06-2014, 04:15 PM   #30
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
Dash man's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Location: Limerick
Posts: 1,670
I rinse off fruits and vegetables to get any remaining soil off. In many vegetables pesticide residue on the surface is minimal, but some may have been absorbed into the produce and couldn't be washed off anyway. Some items are coated in a waxy substance to help preserve them, trapping any residue that is there. Many organic items may not actually be organic since controls and inspections are minimal. So I pretty much just hope it won't affect me before something else gets me first. I've tried growing my own organic veggies, but the little buggers get to it before I do. I'm at least thankful pesticides keep people from being hungry and living long enough to worry about the long term effects.


Sent from my iPhone using Early Retirement Forum
__________________
Dash man is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-06-2014, 05:25 PM   #31
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
audreyh1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Rio Grande Valley
Posts: 16,480
We wash fruits and vegetables thoroughly, often using a type of fruit/veggie wash and rinsing well.

Mushrooms we only wipe.

We eat out often enough to expose our immune systems.
__________________
Well, I thought I was retired. But it seems that now I'm working as a travel agent instead!
audreyh1 is online now   Reply With Quote
Washing Fruits and Vegetables
Old 12-06-2014, 06:44 PM   #32
Recycles dryer sheets
Cassie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Posts: 281
Washing Fruits and Vegetables

Like Richard444, I use vinegar for some fruits. I also try to buy organic.

ImageUploadedByEarly Retirement Forum1417912991.518100.jpg
__________________
Cassie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-06-2014, 07:24 PM   #33
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Posts: 11,018
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cassie View Post
Like Richard444, I use vinegar for some fruits. I also try to buy organic.

Attachment 20582
Hmm. Must give this a try. Anything that stops my strawberries from going fuzzy must be good. These days vinegar is my go-to household chemical of choice.
__________________
Meadbh is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-06-2014, 10:16 PM   #34
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Posts: 7,530
We wash most things before eating. Some veggies have dirt on them like celery, potatoes, and zucchini. I wash most fruit. Plain water wash, no soap or vinegar.

I don't wash lettuce any more. I just peel off the outermost 1-2 layers and eat whatever is inside. I probably consume a bug or two per head. Free protein.
__________________
Retired in 2013 at age 33. Keeping busy reading, blogging, relaxing, gaming, and enjoying the outdoors with my wife and 3 kids (5, 11, and 12).
FUEGO is offline   Reply With Quote
Some Links and My Current Thoughts
Old 12-08-2014, 09:13 AM   #35
Full time employment: Posting here.
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Posts: 925
Some Links and My Current Thoughts

Quote:
Originally Posted by imoldernu View Post
Good subject... Will be very interesting....
Thank you. This thread did generate more activity than I expected.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Richard4444 View Post
I use a mixture of vinegar and water for all of the vegetables and berries that I use for a shake to sit in for 15 minutes, then rinse well in an attempt to get rid of as much pesticide as practical. Also, I only use organic if I can.
After quite a bit of reading over the weekend, this is the habit I am going to try get myself into for my produce. This seems to be the best cost/benefit, risk/reward, etc. in my mind.

The vinegar & water wash is the best option in my opinion for reducing pathogens. Here is a pointer to one of the better studies I found on this topic; the abstract is free: Reduction of poliovirus 1, bacteriophages, Salmonella montevideo, a... - PubMed - NCBI

Apparently, buying organic and rinsing with tap water (link below) are the two best approaches to reducing pesticides (other than buying/raising organically). While I am probably too cheap and lazy to go all organic, I will likely pay more attention to this for the items at the top of this list which ranks pesticide residue after rinsing (and, sometimes pealing): EWG's 2014 Shopper's Guide to Pesticides in Produceâ„¢

Quote:
Originally Posted by W2R View Post
I rinse anything I might actually eat (not bananas, obviously, because I don't eat the peel). I also scrub lightly with my fingertips while rinsing.
Quote:
Originally Posted by MooreBonds View Post
....
Is there any specific evidence or research people have seen that suggests one specific type of wash over another to remove pesticides? (i.e. vinegar and water, versus diluted dish soap, etc.)
Here one link to some research I found on the 'net this weekend on this subject. My summary is that W2R's method of scrubbing with tap water is about the best thing we can do for removing pesticides: CAES: Removal of Trace Pesticide Residues from Produce

Quote:
Originally Posted by 6miths View Post
I thought Cosmo Kramer had a great idea when he was preparing everything in the shower.
As do I; but, my current shower doesn't have the workspace that I would need nor a disposal. This may be a consideration for the next remodel. It should also reduce the number of dinner guests I entertain.
__________________

__________________
If there's one thing in my life that's missing; It's the time I spend alone
Sailing on the cool and bright clear waters; There's lots of those friendly people
Showin me ways to go; And I never want to lose your inspiration
CoolChange is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Growing Vegetables in Containers FIREd Other topics 42 11-29-2009 01:08 PM
Playing with Melons and Fruits.... bbbamI Other topics 14 01-28-2009 04:57 PM
Of vegetables, I eat more xxxx ... (poll) haha Other topics 31 09-15-2008 09:57 PM
Americans Not Eating Enough Fruits and Veggies Mountain_Mike Health and Early Retirement 29 04-04-2007 09:53 PM

 

 
All times are GMT -6. The time now is 09:35 PM.
 
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.