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11 Stocks-5+years Div Growth-5% Yield
Old 12-02-2010, 10:40 AM   #1
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11 Stocks-5+years Div Growth-5% Yield

I noticed PAWS asking about seekingalpha.com website. It is has traders posts & industry posts-[precious metal, oil, etc] & dividend stock posts.
The subject line post is from a website Dividends4Life
Which has free & premium analysis of dividends stocks. The free portion is informative & gives some free analysis of dividend stocks[once a month]. I haven't signed up for the premium portion. But am giving it serious consideration $6/mo or $66/year. I have in NO WAY a financial or any other relationship with the owners of the dividend4life website. If I do sign up for the premium portion: I will report back.

Anyway here is link to the subject line article.
11 Dividend Stocks Offering 5+ Years of Dividend Growth and 5%+ Yields -- Seeking Alpha

As the author points out;"High-yield isnít free. There is usually a reason one stockís yield is higher than another and it is normally tied to risk."
So one must do their due diligence investigation.

I notice that two of the 11 are T & CTL that have significant exposure to the declining local line telephone business while doing battle with other wireless providers such as Verizon, TMobile, Sprint etc.

So the link has been provided for board members to peruse to determine whether there is a gem in the list.

And you might wish to peruse the free dividend4life 2010 analysis.

2010 Analyses | Dividends Value

Good hunting for that income providing stock!
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Old 12-02-2010, 10:52 AM   #2
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Location: Guadalajara Mexico
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If you sign up for the premium content I'd appreciate a follow up with your impressions.

I'm undecided if I should stick to index funds or try my luck at individual stock purchases. I like dividends and the low beta of quality blue-chip dividend payers.

My ROTH and 401K remain in index funds but I've recently begun buying dividend stocks in my taxable account. Hopefully I can support myself with dividends until I can access my 401K. Who know, maybe I'll change my mind
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Old 12-02-2010, 12:31 PM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FreqFlyer View Post
If you sign up for the premium content I'd appreciate a follow up with your impressions.

I'm undecided if I should stick to index funds or try my luck at individual stock purchases. I like dividends and the low beta of quality blue-chip dividend payers.

My ROTH and 401K remain in index funds but I've recently begun buying dividend stocks in my taxable account. Hopefully I can support myself with dividends until I can access my 401K. Who know, maybe I'll change my mind
Will do on premium content.

Index funds are really the path to retirement. I'm mostly in index funds & ETFs. But I got that itch to tinker So I tinker with 20% of my portfolio.

The down side of individual stocks is that they must be monitored more closely than an ETF or index fund. I suppose an alternative is to pick an ETF in stock sectors that are mature, pay a decent dividend, that consumers must make constant purchases such as utilities[XLU 4% yield .21 exp ratio ] or consumer staples[XLP 2.6% yield .21 exp ratio]. They track similar to S&P 500 have more yield. Another factor to take into consideration. XLU is more influenced by interest rates than other sectors though.

Burton G. Malkiel on why "buy & hold" & index funds are still the way to go.
Burton G. Malkiel: 'Buy and Hold' Is Still a Winner - WSJ.com
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Old 12-02-2010, 05:42 PM   #4
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Originally Posted by tjscott0 View Post
Will do on premium content.

Index funds are really the path to retirement. I'm mostly in index funds & ETFs. But I got that itch to tinker So I tinker with 20% of my portfolio.

The down side of individual stocks is that they must be monitored more closely than an ETF or index fund.
I agree which is the reason I've stuck to index funds for my retirement accounts.

A limited amount of stock picking is in part to add some risk/reward to the portfolio and also just a fun hobby. Having some money on the line is a great motivator to learn and stay on top of the markets.

Back during the tech boom I started to blindly buy stocks based on tips or the news. Of course I lost my shirt. Thankfully I was a poor grad student back then and didn't have the means to do anything really stupid.
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Old 12-20-2010, 09:30 AM   #5
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premium report:

First, Here is a accurate description of the Dividend4Life web owner's goals & method of selection:http://http://www.slackerwealth.com/2008/07/review-dividends4life.html

Now what did I get for my $5.95/month?
1)Analyst report on 200 companies. Now I can get free ValuLine reports at the local library. But its a 15 mile drive & someone else could be using the book versus going to the website & logging on.
2)An Open Office spreadsheet on companies in the portfolio of the web owner & companies not owned but have potential for ownership. There was 199 companies on this week's list. Information provided was he estimate of a company's value versus current stock price. Approx 20 were in his estimation selling at a discount to the value of the company. Also indicated is the number of years that a company has paid a dividend & dividend yield & debt to total capitalization & whether the stock is on the dividend achiever &/or aristocrat list to name a few.
3)the Dividend4Life Dashboard. The dashboard basically highlight the best potential buy of the 200 listed companies.

I sold last week two bond ETFs [EMB/LQD] & wish to use that money to buy 4 stocks. Previously throughout the years I've been screening for stocks on the Fidelity website where I've come up with a list of stocks.

Now did I use the Dividend4Life information to make my selections. Well yes & no. I bought ABT & HGIC which have been on my radar screen for a while. Dividend4Life merely reinforced my decision. I bought MCD which wasn't rated for a buy solely because its payout is over 60%. That fact wasn't enough to dissuade me. Now Dividend4Life did persuade me to purchase OMI due to its 20% discount to his perceived value. Now OMI was on my list of potential buys from the Fidelity list. But I wasn't as keen on it due to a dividend yield of only 2.5%. So due to the perceived discount; I bought it.

Now to my estimation of value of the service. He doesn't come up with any stocks that you couldn't come up with. However there is the convenience factor of his doing a weekly spreadsheet. Its worth it to me. I feel the $5.95 a month saves this early retiree time for fun stuff. The spreadsheets act as a backstop/second opinion to my screening. Now as he allows a monthly subscription & I will probably only make 1 to 2 buys a year. I'll subscribe then cancel then subscribe when I'm in position to make a purchase again.

What's really important about website is the idea of yield to cost idea. A person buy a solid company that continually increase dividends so that that stock will be yielding 5% to 10% based on the purchase price in 10 years.
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