Join Early Retirement Today
Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 06-27-2016, 05:55 AM   #21
Recycles dryer sheets
oma's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Tampa/St Petersburg, FLA
Posts: 305
Quote:
Originally Posted by LOL! View Post
It looks like I'm screwed with no upside in the next few months. Probably time to go from 60/40 to 40/60.
I moved my TSP from I/S to F-fund. Will hold it there until after the election, I guess. I told myself not to time the market and it appeared that the Brexit would be to "remain" two days prior, but the move did allow me to save a portion of the portfolio from the volatility.

Might move it back if I see a huge drop in the market (buying opportunity), but I've got to get out of this habit of timing the market that I periodically do. I won't need the money for a long time if ever thankfully.
__________________

__________________
oma is offline   Reply With Quote
Join the #1 Early Retirement and Financial Independence Forum Today - It's Totally Free!

Are you planning to be financially independent as early as possible so you can live life on your own terms? Discuss successful investing strategies, asset allocation models, tax strategies and other related topics in our online forum community. Our members range from young folks just starting their journey to financial independence, military retirees and even multimillionaires. No matter where you fit in you'll find that Early-Retirement.org is a great community to join. Best of all it's totally FREE!

You are currently viewing our boards as a guest so you have limited access to our community. Please take the time to register and you will gain a lot of great new features including; the ability to participate in discussions, network with our members, see fewer ads, upload photographs, create a retirement blog, send private messages and so much, much more!

Old 06-27-2016, 07:12 AM   #22
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
imoldernu's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Location: Central Illinois
Posts: 4,090
Over the weekend, most of the financial news TV stations were geared to the international effects of the Brexit. Many of the financial gurus keyed their expectations for the individual country's markets, to the intrinsic value based on the outstanding debt.

This website covers the basics. The detailed columns are sortable by clicking on the headings.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_o..._external_debt

While the current confusion about the future of world markets will likely take some time before stabilizing, the personal individual debt may give an indication of long term volatility. Just one more factor to consider as we look into that crystal ball.
__________________

__________________
imoldernu is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-30-2016, 09:53 AM   #23
Recycles dryer sheets
FIREmenow's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2013
Posts: 378
Today, my 60/40 portfolio is back to -0.078% from where it was the day before the Brexit decision.
__________________
FIREmenow is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 06-30-2016, 10:39 AM   #24
Dryer sheet aficionado
 
Join Date: May 2016
Location: Finger Lakes
Posts: 29
With my 40/60 portfolio, I am within a few bucks of where I was.

If the S&P closes up ( up about 18 right now) I should be to the plus side...
__________________
LuckyDog is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-30-2016, 06:18 PM   #25
Recycles dryer sheets
 
Join Date: Jun 2014
Posts: 426
Drama is great for the media as it gives them something new to talk amount.

It's great for institutions because it causes activity... ie transaction fees.

Not sure how much it matters to me.

There's super low correlation between big historical events and major market moves I think?

Sent from my HTC One_M8 using Early Retirement Forum mobile app
__________________
petershk is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-03-2016, 06:59 AM   #26
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Alberta/Ontario/ Arizona
Posts: 2,483
Quote:
Originally Posted by petershk View Post
Drama is great for the media as it gives them something new to talk amount.

It's great for institutions because it causes activity... ie transaction fees.

Not sure how much it matters to me.

There's super low correlation between big historical events and major market moves I think?

Sent from my HTC One_M8 using Early Retirement Forum mobile app
Yes, I would agree. Historical events can certainly increase volatility though. I still think best to simply ignore almost everything of this nature.
__________________
Danmar is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-03-2016, 08:28 AM   #27
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
Major Tom's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: SF East Bay
Posts: 2,951
Quote:
Originally Posted by LOL! View Post
What kind of question is that? I thought I had the most-viewed newsletter thread on this forum that defined me. I must work harder on that.
Oooooer, now you've upset him
__________________
ER, for all intents and purposes. Part-time income <5% of annual expenditure.
Major Tom is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-03-2016, 10:20 AM   #28
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Posts: 8,051
Quote:
Originally Posted by Major Tom View Post
Oooooer, now you've upset him
No worries. My indignation was short-lived -- about as short-lived as the dump from Brexit.
__________________
LOL! is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-30-2016, 08:59 AM   #29
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Posts: 1,495
Bumped this thread after reading this excellent blog" post on lessons learned in the aftermath of all the Brexit hoopla of sound and fury signifying nothing."

Tim Harford — Article — Brexit and the power of wishful thinking

Quote:
Perhaps the most important lesson is that we spend too much energy trying to foretell the future, and too little trying to be resilient whatever happens.
Quote:
It’s time for more serious scenario thinking about the UK’s future in Europe. Because scenarios are persuasive stories, they can help us face up to uncomfortable prospects and think clearly about possibilities we would rather ignore. And because scenarios contradict each other, they force us to acknowledge that, in the end, we cannot actually see into the future. As a result, we move from a sterile question to a fertile one — from “What will happen?” to “What will we do if it does?” it does?
__________________

__________________
Options is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Brexit! Taxman59 FIRE Related Public Policy 142 11-07-2016 01:00 PM
Brexit Paper Loss retire2020 FIRE and Money 98 06-28-2016 09:05 AM
Brexit Ed_The_Gypsy Stock Picking and Market Strategy 0 06-24-2016 11:50 PM

 

 
All times are GMT -6. The time now is 04:35 AM.
 
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.