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Old 02-02-2013, 05:34 PM   #21
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...I agree, but I've found for myself that when we go it alone I enjoy the excursions less because I'm so much more concerned about getting back to the ship. I never managed to get past that.
I used to have this same issue; but, I am actually becoming more adventurous/risk-tolerant in some areas as I age (possibly as I gain both experience and funds to deal with anything going sideways). I moved from worrying about this to thinking of it as part of the adventure to not even thinking about it now.

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....And watch the alcohol. Booze (esp hangover!) makes motion sickness worse
I had not heard this before; but, it does agree with personal experience: The only two times in my life that I have dealt with any kind of seasickness both also involved drinking beforehand.

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You didn't ask, but I lived in Keflavik, Iceland for a year. You will be tempted to visit the Blue Lagoon. It is a big tourist trap. It is actually a geo-thermal plant of some sort with a big lake full of runoff water. They charge you to swim in this runoff with a bunch of non-Icelanders.

As an alternative, I suggest the Reykjavik public swimming pool. It will actually be full of locals and the water is much hotter and much cleaner than the Blue Lagoon. There are various temperature hot tubs, an olympic size pool, and a slide or two, not to mention steam rooms and tall blonde Icelandic women. It is probably 5% of the price of the Blue Lagoon
These are exactly the kind of non-cruise ship sponsored excursions that I usually seek. Thank you very much for the tip; now, if only I can remember it when/if I finally do visit Iceland.
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Old 02-02-2013, 07:08 PM   #22
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DW and I have weak stomachs so we definitely know that Dramamine works for us. Typically for a day fishing trip in AK offshore waters, we take a single pill of the old style (classic?) pill the night before. This one works faster and makes you drowsy but if you take it the night before, it helps you sleep and is an advantage. The morning of the trip, we take a single pill of the newer less drowsy version (the words are on the package so you can tell). AFAIK this is like a time-released version so it doesn't make you drowsy and lasts longer.

For our 2 wk AUS-NZ cruise, we didn't want to be drugged up the whole time so tried to check out the weather forecasts for the next day on the ship's TV. This is taking a bit of a risk because,as mentioned by others, the pill is a preventive measure , not a cure. If you wait until you are feeling queasy, it may be too late.........so perhaps take a pill if in doubt. We did survive the trip w/ no problems.........good forecasting on the TV or perhaps just luck.
Walmart had great prices for Dramamine compared to the chain drugstores.
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Old 02-02-2013, 07:20 PM   #23
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Just got back from a cruise. I do get motion sickness and I wore the patch. I said on this cruise that I was going to explore other types of prevention on future cruises, because of the side effects. Years ago, when I wore contacts, the patch blurred my vision and I would have trouble reading. It makes me tired and very thirsty. This time, my eyes were partially dilated (which made them tired and sensitive to sunlight). I will have to try some of these other remedies.

As others said, the tips were automatically charged to our bill. A few dollars extra was given when they had room service in the morning. One of our group left the ship in a wheelchair and they tipped the person who helped her $5.00.
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Old 02-02-2013, 08:11 PM   #24
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I've also had success with Bonine (meclizine) as a preventive seasick medicine. But whatever you choose, I strongly recommend you not get cocky and stop while you are on the cruise. As another poster noted, it is difficult to recover from seasickness once it sets in, while preventing it is so much easier.
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Old 02-02-2013, 08:39 PM   #25
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In the North Atlantic, I have found that, except in extremely heavy sea states, once you go below 150 feet you don't feel the motion.
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Old 02-02-2013, 08:43 PM   #26
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In the North Atlantic, I have found that, except in extremely heavy sea states, once you go below 150 feet you don't feel the motion.
If I stop posting here it's probably because I've gone below 150 feet.
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Old 02-02-2013, 11:35 PM   #27
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Best cruise info website I use is Cruise Reviews, Cruise Deals and Cruises - Cruise Critic to pick up tips and info. We have 23 cruises under our belts and use this site extensively to research ships, activities, ports, excursions, etc.

For sea sickness, drink...seriously! ;-) Nothing like putting a lil' Capt Morgan's in ya' to steady the sails! Just sayin'.
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Old 02-03-2013, 12:05 AM   #28
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We were in Bermuda this past summer and our cruise departure was delayed by several hours by a couple who,did. Or make it back to the ship in time and they were NOToff on any ship related tour. Their secret? I think it was because they had left a minor child on the ship and the ship would neither leave without the parent nor would they leave an unattended minor n shore and depart....so not always true that they will leave without you if you are late.
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Old 02-03-2013, 02:02 AM   #29
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I use the sea bands and have very good luck with them, they work by hitting an acupressure spot on the inside of your wrists. They probably aren't enough if you get really seasick, but for milder issues it's a nice drug free way to go. I also eat candied ginger and drink ginger ale.

I've heard of a lot of people having problems with side effects with the patches, and that you can cut the patches in half to get a smaller dosage with less side effects.
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Old 02-03-2013, 05:45 AM   #30
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The least amount of movement on board ship is an inside cabin on the lowest deck in the middle of the ship. The higher you go on the outside cabins fore or aft the more motion. Motion = potential Mal de Mer.

Cheers!
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Old 02-03-2013, 08:33 AM   #31
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ask the cpt to steer the ship. That worked for me when sailing in the GoM.
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Old 02-03-2013, 08:41 AM   #32
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Utterly irrelevant to cruise ships, but two anecdotes:

When I was young, my father used to take me deep sea fishing. While I loved the fishing part, I usually got violently seasick. These were boats 80-110 feet long, and swells were often 20 feet or more, especially in winter.

Eventually, I figured out the secret, at least for me. Keeping my stomach full was the key to avoiding nausea. I ate a huge breakfast and brought plenty of sandwiches for the day on the water. Once I started doing this, I never got seasick again.

Another:
My mother had a weak stomach, and generally got seasick even going out on flat water in the bay. We got her Bonamine, which always solved the problem. Then one day I happened to notice that the Bonamine pills looked exactly the same as Bufferin tablets, so my father and I replaced the pills in her Bonamine bottle with Bufferin. She never noticed, but never had a problem either. The placebo effect at work!
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Old 02-03-2013, 09:56 AM   #33
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In the North Atlantic, I have found that, except in extremely heavy sea states, once you go below 150 feet you don't feel the motion.
You also don't get to see the spectacular northern lights.
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Old 02-03-2013, 10:41 AM   #34
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I've tried every motion sickness remedy out there. What works for me is the wristband that emits very tiny electrostatic shock (barely perceptible).

Too late now, but I always try to get a cabin close to the middle of the boat and the lower the level, the less motion.
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Old 02-03-2013, 10:55 AM   #35
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Thanks again for all the replies, which DW has also reviewed.

The booking agents were very good and advised cabins in midships low down, which was something we had not considered before calling them.
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Old 02-03-2013, 11:14 AM   #36
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...
Eventually, I figured out the secret, at least for me. Keeping my stomach full was the key to avoiding nausea. I ate a huge breakfast and brought plenty of sandwiches for the day on the water. Once I started doing this, I never got seasick again....
This should be very easy to try on a cruise. Maybe this also explains why I am rarely seasick.
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Old 02-03-2013, 12:03 PM   #37
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The cruise ships these days are so big that you only feel the biggest swells although we also book midships. Keep in mind, the Bismarck was 41,000 tons. The last cruise ship I was on, the Norwegian Star, is 91,000 tons. That being said, I have taken the old standby Dramamine.

I also recommend the Cruise Critic boards for discussions of what to do in each port.
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Old 02-03-2013, 01:11 PM   #38
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If you want to try non-drug alternative, DW & I have used these accupressure wrist bands with good results-
Buy Sea-Band The Original Wristband, Adult, One Size & More | drugstore.com

And watch the alcohol. Booze (esp hangover!) makes motion sickness worse
I get seasick very easily and the bands do a great job keeping me feeling well.
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Old 02-03-2013, 01:25 PM   #39
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Utterly irrelevant to cruise ships, but two anecdotes:

Another:
My mother had a weak stomach, and generally got seasick even going out on flat water in the bay. We got her Bonamine, which always solved the problem. Then one day I happened to notice that the Bonamine pills looked exactly the same as Bufferin tablets, so my father and I replaced the pills in her Bonamine bottle with Bufferin. She never noticed, but never had a problem either. The placebo effect at work!
It took me a few years to try the bands because I had a hard time believing they would work. I became a believer when I saw it was not just the placebo effect. We were on a catamaran trip in St. Thomas (cruise ship excursion) and several of us were turning green and feeding the fishes. One of the passengers was wearing bands and he shared one with a girl who was as miserable as I was. The guy spoke English and the girl didn't so he couldn't explain to her what the band was for. Within 10 minutes of putting on the band, she was fine. Typically, you wear one on each wrist but he wasn't giving both of them away no matter how pretty she was! My stomach is doing flip flops just thinking about that boat ride.
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