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Old 09-07-2016, 01:35 PM   #21
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So...yeah, I can see how that would be a good thing for y'all.
Here's my take: put everything in the RV you need to use it on short notice--bed linens, silverware, toiletries, paper towels/plates, trash bags, etc. Keep them in it. Those huge ziplock bags are great for storing linens and towels (throw a dryer sheet in there, too).

We did lots of short trips in the Argosy and because it was ready to go, it was easy to just load up the beer and snacks and hit the road. That makes it painless. As you know, we didn't worry too much about cleanliness (what with 10 people sorta living out of it at the music festival) but did give it a deep clean a few times a year.

I liked the motorhome because we could just GO. I wouldn't necessarily object to a towable, but if you don't already have a tow-ready vehicle, then that's another thing to maintain and pay insurance and taxes on.

I can say that we used to do a weekend camping trip every year with friends who had a pop-up. Jeez, it rained one time, and they had a damn mess trying to get that thing packed back up and closed. We just unplugged the shore power and drove away.
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Old 09-07-2016, 01:35 PM   #22
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It sounds to me like getting ready to go, doing the traveling (even a short 2 hour trip) and clean up afterwards means at least a two night trip, just to have some time to actually relax.
You got it. Taking the RV out for only one night is simply not worth the effort - at least not for me.
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Old 09-07-2016, 02:19 PM   #23
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The least amount of time we take it for is 2 nights. It is a lot of work to pack/unpack, etc. We have 4 dogs so need their stuff too. Even with dishes in bags so as not to get dirty you still have to load the food, meds, etc and clothes.
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Old 09-07-2016, 02:28 PM   #24
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The least amount of time we take it for is 2 nights. It is a lot of work to pack/unpack, etc. We have 4 dogs so need their stuff too. Even with dishes in bags so as not to get dirty you still have to load the food, meds, etc and clothes.
I would agree that is the min for us as well. We have a very nice county campground 15 miles from the cabin and do many 2-3 night stay there. Can even run back if we forgot something.
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Old 09-07-2016, 02:29 PM   #25
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Also at the end of the season you have to bring in everything and wash it and store it. If you put it back in RV it will be dusty by spring.
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Old 09-07-2016, 02:34 PM   #26
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So...yeah, I can see how that would be a good thing for y'all.
Here's my take: put everything in the RV you need to use it on short notice--bed linens, silverware, toiletries, paper towels/plates, trash bags, etc. Keep them in it. Those huge ziplock bags are great for storing linens and towels (throw a dryer sheet in there, too).

We did lots of short trips in the Argosy and because it was ready to go, it was easy to just load up the beer and snacks and hit the road. That makes it painless. As you know, we didn't worry too much about cleanliness (what with 10 people sorta living out of it at the music festival) but did give it a deep clean a few times a year.

I liked the motorhome because we could just GO. I wouldn't necessarily object to a towable, but if you don't already have a tow-ready vehicle, then that's another thing to maintain and pay insurance and taxes on.

I can say that we used to do a weekend camping trip every year with friends who had a pop-up. Jeez, it rained one time, and they had a damn mess trying to get that thing packed back up and closed. We just unplugged the shore power and drove away.

A whole dryer sheet?
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Old 09-07-2016, 02:48 PM   #27
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If it's a recycled sheet, I don't see why not. One needs to splurge once in a while.
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Old 09-07-2016, 02:56 PM   #28
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We only use our 25' class C for long treks of more than 1 month. However, if one uses the motorhome more often, say at least once every two weeks, and if he is able to park the motorhome at home, then the preparation does not take that long because a lot of stuff can be left in. You can keep the fridge plugged in, so that you do not have to empty it, for example.

I can use the sewer drain cleanout at the front of the home to dump tanks. That, and the ability to park it at home makes the preparation, plus the maintenance of the RV a lot more convenient. I can get to it whenever I feel like, instead of having to drive it to and from a storage lot.

And I can do the same at both of my homes. We always stop by the high-country home on the way out or back, if it is on the way. And that is always true when I head in the north or northeast direction, which happens quite often as we live in the southwest.
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Old 09-07-2016, 03:01 PM   #29
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Originally Posted by Sarah in SC View Post
So...yeah, I can see how that would be a good thing for y'all.
Here's my take: put everything in the RV you need to use it on short notice--bed linens, silverware, toiletries, paper towels/plates, trash bags, etc. Keep them in it. Those huge ziplock bags are great for storing linens and towels (throw a dryer sheet in there, too).

We did lots of short trips in the Argosy and because it was ready to go, it was easy to just load up the beer and snacks and hit the road. That makes it painless. As you know, we didn't worry too much about cleanliness (what with 10 people sorta living out of it at the music festival) but did give it a deep clean a few times a year.

I liked the motorhome because we could just GO. I wouldn't necessarily object to a towable, but if you don't already have a tow-ready vehicle, then that's another thing to maintain and pay insurance and taxes on.

I can say that we used to do a weekend camping trip every year with friends who had a pop-up. Jeez, it rained one time, and they had a damn mess trying to get that thing packed back up and closed. We just unplugged the shore power and drove away.
Oooh! Floydfest! I wasn't even thinking about that. Now I can go do the whole hippie thing, instead of driving back to my hotel each night. Which was not a good idea most of the time. OK, I'm sold.
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Old 09-07-2016, 05:20 PM   #30
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I can use the sewer drain cleanout at the front of the home to dump tanks. That, and the ability to park it at home makes the preparation, plus the maintenance of the RV a lot more convenient.
How hard is that to do? One of my hesitations about getting an RV is that I would see using a small RV primarily for going to my running races, sporting events, and road trips, and not as much at campgrounds where I'd have easy access to a dumping station. And I think I'm probably 30 minutes from the nearest place I could go. Dumping at home would be very attractive.

I know where my cleanout is. It's downhill from my driveway, which is good, though not super easily accessible. It actually sticks about a foot above ground, rather than at ground level like I think most of them are, and right before the grinder pump to help send the sewage up to the road.
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Old 09-07-2016, 05:40 PM   #31
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We own a 34 foot diesel pusher motor home. We have gone on a two month sabbatical rv trip all over the country as well as one week trips to Key West, New Orleans and Maine. We have also enjoyed going on weekend trips to music festivals, jeep festivals, college football games, punkin chunkin, the beach, etc. We enjoy the freedom and variety of being able to be in totally different surroundings from one night to the next. This past Christmas week we spent two blocks from the French Quarter in the middle of New Orleans. We left that camping resort and the next day drove to a state park that was totally secluded and scenic. I tell people that buying the motor home was the most irrational thing I have ever done in my life, but sometimes you just need to be irrational and enjoy life and the fruits of your labor. So far we have rv'd to all 48 of the US continental states. I say go for it!!!!!!!!
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Old 09-07-2016, 06:29 PM   #32
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How hard is that to do? One of my hesitations about getting an RV is that I would see using a small RV primarily for going to my running races, sporting events, and road trips, and not as much at campgrounds where I'd have easy access to a dumping station. And I think I'm probably 30 minutes from the nearest place I could go. Dumping at home would be very attractive.

I know where my cleanout is. It's downhill from my driveway, which is good, though not super easily accessible. It actually sticks about a foot above ground, rather than at ground level like I think most of them are, and right before the grinder pump to help send the sewage up to the road.
I have a maceration pump from Flojet that hooks to the rv and then uses a hose to the cleanout of my septic. Only way to go. Works great and can go anywhere.
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Old 09-07-2016, 06:41 PM   #33
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Oooh! Floydfest! I wasn't even thinking about that. Now I can go do the whole hippie thing, instead of driving back to my hotel each night. Which was not a good idea most of the time. OK, I'm sold.

Oh yeah...now you are thinking right! And showers!!! No carney feet in sight.
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Old 09-07-2016, 06:58 PM   #34
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I vote for go for it! A small RV is well suited to what you described - everything from tailgating, going to the lake for the day, etc.

We had a Class B (van) for several years and it was perfect IMO for short trips and reasonably well-suited for long trips too. A small Class C would work well too but don't overlook a Class B. Class B is even easier to park - both in your driveway and while traveling - and generally takes up less room. A 19' - 22' or so Class C would work well for you I'm sure.

Regarding the start up part... That depends on you. Some thoughts to consider - keep some clothes and food in the RV at all time? Load clothes and food only when going on a trip? Keep the refrigerator cold at all times? or turn in on a day before leaving? You get the idea.

Regarding departing from campground... in our Class B we very seldom connected to anything other than electric and that was only when we wanted to run the air conditioner for extended times. So our departure time was very quick. We found leveling the Class B was normally not necessary (compared to our trailer). We normally filled the fresh water tank when needed and dumped the sewer when needed - for us that was every third day or so.

Boondocking can range from staying overnight in a Cracker Barrel parking lot to staying overnight in a backcountry Forest Service area. Both have their pluses and minuses and were integral parts of our travels.

For comparison, there is quite a bit more effort involved with traveling in/with our trailer. For short duration trips there is nothing like a small motorhome.

Best Wishes. Keep us posted.
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Old 09-07-2016, 07:27 PM   #35
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Winters away from the house in warmer non snow-belt areas in our new to us
older 28' refurbished travel trailer. this will be an adventure and a baptism by fire. not a shorter nearer to home jaunt. we have tried a couple outings one boondocking and one at a private park with power. Well the nice thing is that we can always head for
the barn if we get tired of the road. Oh...and the equipment is all PAID FOR.
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Old 09-07-2016, 08:47 PM   #36
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I find it's close to a full day packing the camper to leave for a trip regardless how long you're gone. Unless you're camping next to a grocery store, you have to plan ahead every bite you eat and I tend to take too much food. Then plan your clothing. I keep the camper stocked with linens and cookware. My husband sorts the fishing gear and loads the bikes. Once you get to the campsite, it's only about 15 minutes getting hooked up, same when you depart. Then another day unpacking and cleaning when we get home. We did the motorhome thing for ten years, now down to a small pull camper. I've about decided it's time to rent cabins or hotel rooms.
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Old 09-07-2016, 08:57 PM   #37
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We do it all the time. We started with a 24 foot class c, then a 31 foot class c and now, a 34 foot class a with 3 slides. I do one night to multi-week trips. Love it. I've had them for almost 20 years. I like that I can stay in places where there aren't motels or hotels.
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Old 09-07-2016, 09:31 PM   #38
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How hard is that to do? One of my hesitations about getting an RV is that I would see using a small RV primarily for going to my running races, sporting events, and road trips, and not as much at campgrounds where I'd have easy access to a dumping station. And I think I'm probably 30 minutes from the nearest place I could go. Dumping at home would be very attractive.

I know where my cleanout is. It's downhill from my driveway, which is good, though not super easily accessible. It actually sticks about a foot above ground, rather than at ground level like I think most of them are, and right before the grinder pump to help send the sewage up to the road.
The cleanout pipes at my homes happen to be in a convenient spot where I can park the RV next to them. They are of the same diameter (3") as the dump hose and the standard dump station pipe. All I do is to remove the cap and stick the dump hose elbow in.

If your pipe sticks out above ground but is still lower than the RV, a trough can be made to support the hose off the ground, yet still maintains a slant downhill from the RV to the pipe. In fact, this is what I had to do at my high-country home.

The ability to dump tanks at home is great. I can take my time to clean out and flush the tanks well before putting the RV away. At public dump stations, there are often people waiting, and I would not want to hold them up to do a good job.
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Old 09-07-2016, 09:35 PM   #39
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Winters away from the house in warmer non snow-belt areas in our new to us
older 28' refurbished travel trailer. this will be an adventure and a baptism by fire. not a shorter nearer to home jaunt. we have tried a couple outings one boondocking and one at a private park with power. Well the nice thing is that we can always head for
the barn if we get tired of the road. Oh...and the equipment is all PAID FOR.
Do yourself a great favor. Before you hit the road on a long voyage, do many more weekend trips. There's nothing worse than not knowing how the RV works and how to handle setting up and moving really well. These things take a certain amount of ingenuity to deal with.

And go to a big parking lot and practicing backing up a long trailer. Don't forget to look up when you're in tight places as they're very tall.
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Old 09-07-2016, 09:53 PM   #40
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We often spend a single night at a beachside casino. 3 hour drive each way with maybe a half hour getting ready to go including loading and a half hour after returning which includes unloading and dumping the tanks just before getting home. We are in a 32' class c and only boondock, usually 2 or 3 nights at a time be it out in the desert or some river or lake in the PNW. We do have storage at home and the mh is plugged in full time including the fridge. If we are staying several days we will put out the solar on sunny days to charge the batteries.
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