Join Early Retirement Today
Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 07-18-2015, 01:41 PM   #41
Moderator Emeritus
 
Join Date: May 2007
Posts: 11,038
We have been thinking about getting a EU passport for DW. Turns out, when we got hitched 15 years ago, I screwed up the final step of the convoluted process to make our marriage official back in my home country. So, as far as they are concerned, I am still single! And she cannot apply until I correct the situation. Although I wonder if she could still get a EU passport based on the fact that her mother was born in a EU country - and as far as I know never renounced her citizenship when she moved to the US. It seems possible in some EU countries but not in others, so we may have to look into that.
__________________

__________________
FIREd is online now   Reply With Quote
Join the #1 Early Retirement and Financial Independence Forum Today - It's Totally Free!

Are you planning to be financially independent as early as possible so you can live life on your own terms? Discuss successful investing strategies, asset allocation models, tax strategies and other related topics in our online forum community. Our members range from young folks just starting their journey to financial independence, military retirees and even multimillionaires. No matter where you fit in you'll find that Early-Retirement.org is a great community to join. Best of all it's totally FREE!

You are currently viewing our boards as a guest so you have limited access to our community. Please take the time to register and you will gain a lot of great new features including; the ability to participate in discussions, network with our members, see fewer ads, upload photographs, create a retirement blog, send private messages and so much, much more!

Old 07-18-2015, 01:53 PM   #42
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Posts: 5,326
Quote:
Originally Posted by FIREd View Post
We have been thinking about getting a EU passport for DW. Turns out, when we got hitched 15 years ago, I screwed up the final step of the convoluted process to make our marriage official back in my home country. So, as far as they are concerned, I am still single! And she cannot apply until I correct the situation. Although I wonder if she could still get a EU passport based on the fact that her mother was born in a EU country - and as far as I know never renounced her citizenship when she moved to the US. It seems possible in some EU countries but not in others, so we may have to look into that.
That may be possible and also some countries have fast track to citizenship for spouses - but they usually require continued residence for a certain number of years.
__________________

__________________
Even clouds seem bright and breezy, 'Cause the livin' is free and easy, See the rat race in a new way, Like you're wakin' up to a new day (Dr. Tarr and Professor Fether lyrics, Alan Parsons Project, based on an EA Poe story)
daylatedollarshort is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-18-2015, 02:02 PM   #43
Moderator Emeritus
 
Join Date: May 2007
Posts: 11,038
Quote:
Originally Posted by daylatedollarshort View Post
That may be possible and also some countries have fast track to citizenship for spouses - but they usually require continued residence for a certain number of years.
My country only requires two things for citizenship through marriage (at least for people like us who are not residents):

1) having been married to a citizen for at least 4 years and being able to prove that we live together. Check.
2) having a good knowledge of our language (spoken and written). Hum, DW needs to work a bit more on that.
__________________
FIREd is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 07-18-2015, 09:46 PM   #44
Moderator
Alan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Eee Bah Gum
Posts: 21,091
Quote:
Originally Posted by Peter View Post
BarbWire, if you moved to the UK permanently, you would have NHS coverage. So would anyone, UK passport or not.
+1

People settling from outside the EU have to be resident for a period (I think) but for sure a UK citizen is entitled to the NHS on day 1 that they arrive in the country as a permanent resident.

I can understand BarbWire's father not wanting to give up his old passport, but you always get the old, expired passport returned and I have my old big thick and heavy passports going back to my original British passport in 1976.
__________________
Retired in Jan, 2010 at 55, moved to England in May 2016
Now it's adventure before dementia
Alan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-18-2015, 09:52 PM   #45
Recycles dryer sheets
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Posts: 143
Quote:
Originally Posted by daylatedollarshort View Post
That may be possible and also some countries have fast track to citizenship for spouses - but they usually require continued residence for a certain number of years.
I have a friend who is trying to establish Italian citizenship based on parentage. Their process is more complex, takes much longer and is more expensive: for example he needs pricey "official" translations into Italian of all non-Italian documents (eg birth certificates) and that ain't cheap.

He's rather jealous of the UK process, which is insanely simple by comparison.
__________________
BarbWire is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-18-2015, 09:57 PM   #46
Recycles dryer sheets
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Posts: 143
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alan View Post
+1

People settling from outside the EU have to be resident for a period (I think) but for sure a UK citizen is entitled to the NHS on day 1 that they arrive in the country as a permanent resident.
That's good to know about the NHS, though I doubt I will become an official permanent UK resident any time soon (despite my absurd premium under the ACA for maternity care and other coverage I don't need...oops, wrong forum for that rant). For the next few years I'd like to spend half my time in Europe and half my time in, oh, I dunno, Thailand and Indonesia ....

In all seriousness, though, I suppose I should figure out where it makes more sense to spend time in an Alzheimer's home or nursing home: US or UK. I suppose it is good to have options...
__________________
BarbWire is offline   Reply With Quote
Just because you can...doesn't mean you should
Old 07-19-2015, 12:15 AM   #47
Recycles dryer sheets
Dd852's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Location: London/UK
Posts: 212
Just because you can...doesn't mean you should

I am a dual US/UK citizen. I became naturalized in the UK when I lived there and bought property; for me, the key was being able to return and live and work there without worrying about visas whenever I wanted. I'd say it was the right decision for me.

But if I didn't have property in the UK, and I had no desire to work in Europe, and I had no future plans to rely on the NHS, I think the hassle and expense wouldn't be worth it. Passports cost about 82 GBP ($120) now...but all governments around the world use rising fees to supplement taxes and who knows what it will cost next time around.

Unless you live there, taxes aren't an issue, which is great (just don't spend too long there in any one year! Here's the official guidance for when you fall into the UK tax net: https://www.gov.uk/government/upload...ted_078500.pdf)

But the bottom line is really what do you gain? The list of countries where US and UK citizens can travel without visas is basically overlapping. And US citizens get six months visa free entry to the UK -- you just can't work.

So that brings us back to work... if you think you'll want to work in the EU, go for it. Otherwise, I think it's no huge harm if it is something you really want for sentimental reasons. But no huge gain either.
__________________
Dd852 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-17-2016, 04:23 PM   #48
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
 
Join Date: Feb 2014
Posts: 1,049
Just an update, I am the OP.

Waiting on my US passport now. Had to get my long form birth certificate showing parents full names, that took 2 months. Will send the UK application soon.

My thinking is, you never know how things will turn out and I would like the option to escape the US if needed. And besides I think it is cool to have. Might move there for a year, it would be an adventure.
__________________
jim584672 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-17-2016, 05:51 PM   #49
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Posts: 1,684
We have/had certificates of patriality for the UK, as does my son. We got ours years ago when we were 'vanning it' through Europe. Our son got his a few years go whe. He was working his way through Europe. He was very thankful to have it.

We have parents/grandparents born in the UK and we are citizens of a Commonwealth country. It gives us just about everything except the right to vote. Our son got off the plane and started work within days. His employer processed his National Insurance forms and he was working straight away. Never had occasion to access the social systems or the health systems though.

It never hurts to have options.
__________________
brett is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-18-2016, 10:14 AM   #50
gone traveling
 
Join Date: Apr 2016
Location: Tenerife
Posts: 67
British passport is the best passport for travelling on the planet, and it allows you free travel, immigration, work, and investment across all EU countries.
A definte yes is the answer if you could get one.
Being British doesn't entitle you to the NHS, you need to be a paying national insurance contributor to be entitled to it.
Good luck
__________________
languagefan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-18-2016, 10:51 AM   #51
Full time employment: Posting here.
dixonge's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Ajijic
Posts: 847
My family was originally from the UK - by any chance does this possibility extend back over multiple generations, to -- like, maybe -- say 1689?

Just checking...

__________________
dixonge is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-18-2016, 01:24 PM   #52
Recycles dryer sheets
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Posts: 447
Quote:
Originally Posted by languagefan View Post
Being British doesn't entitle you to the NHS, you need to be a paying national insurance contributor to be entitled to it.
Good luck
Not quite correct. The requirement is that you are permanently resident in the UK.
__________________
Peter is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 04-18-2016, 01:33 PM   #53
Full time employment: Posting here.
NYEXPAT's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Miraflores,Peru
Posts: 873
Quote:
Originally Posted by jim584672 View Post
Just an update, I am the OP.

Waiting on my US passport now. Had to get my long form birth certificate showing parents full names, that took 2 months. Will send the UK application soon.

My thinking is, you never know how things will turn out and I would like the option to escape the US if needed. And besides I think it is cool to have. Might move there for a year, it would be an adventure.
Nice thing about the UK is you can get two passports issued with different numbers.
__________________
NYEXPAT is online now   Reply With Quote
Get a British passport?
Old 04-18-2016, 02:18 PM   #54
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
Fedup's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Location: Southern Cal
Posts: 2,930
Get a British passport?

If you have NHS, how do they know you are paying or not?
Just out of curiosity, my health insurance carries overseas.

Sent from my iPad using Early Retirement Forum
__________________
When I post IIRC, that means going by memory. Google is your friend for facts. Stop being a lazy bum, I can't do all the googling for you. I'm lazy too. LOL
Fedup is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-18-2016, 03:12 PM   #55
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
 
Join Date: Feb 2014
Posts: 1,049
Based on what I have read legal residency is the sole requirement for free coverage.
__________________
jim584672 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-18-2016, 03:38 PM   #56
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
Fedup's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Location: Southern Cal
Posts: 2,930
My niece is a doctor there but she told me I would get coverage there, my husband has NHS but he is no longer contributed to NHS. Both of my kids have UK passports but no NHS. When I see her this year I need to ask again, just for information only.


Sent from my iPad using Early Retirement Forum
__________________
When I post IIRC, that means going by memory. Google is your friend for facts. Stop being a lazy bum, I can't do all the googling for you. I'm lazy too. LOL
Fedup is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-19-2016, 08:47 PM   #57
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Posts: 1,684
Wait until after the Grexit vote!
__________________
brett is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-20-2016, 12:12 AM   #58
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Posts: 11,017
Quote:
Originally Posted by brett View Post
Wait until after the Grexit vote!
Do you mean the Brexit vote?
__________________
Meadbh is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-20-2016, 07:36 AM   #59
gone traveling
 
Join Date: Apr 2016
Location: Tenerife
Posts: 67
Residency and national insurance contribution are both necessary.
__________________
languagefan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-20-2016, 08:54 AM   #60
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
 
Join Date: Feb 2014
Posts: 1,049
Quote:
Originally Posted by languagefan View Post
Residency and national insurance contribution are both necessary.
I am trying to understand the UK system. So I register my citizenship, move to the UK indefinitely. I have paid no UK taxes in my life. I would not get free coverage?
__________________

__________________
jim584672 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
British Sub-prime humor ats5g FIRE and Money 8 12-14-2007 04:47 AM
Iran the british navy and what should be done. newguy88 Other topics 80 04-05-2007 03:06 PM
British pulling out of Iraq laurence Other topics 74 03-02-2007 04:39 PM
Middle-age Americans Sicker than British REWahoo Life after FIRE 21 05-03-2006 10:44 PM
British Expats, Need Rescueing OldAgePensioner Other topics 9 03-20-2006 10:14 PM

 

 
All times are GMT -6. The time now is 02:52 PM.
 
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.