Join Early Retirement Today
Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 09-18-2013, 04:32 AM   #21
Full time employment: Posting here.
Moscyn's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Posts: 728
I also find Red Eye flights are especially cold. Don't know why the air cond is blasting cold. I need to be snug and warm in order to sleep. The flight blankets are also quite thin ( except for those on business or first class). Well, I'll be taking a 13- hr flight from Hong Kong to Paris next week and I hope my usual Xanax will help me sleep at least 6 hours. I thought I am one of those few who resort to medication but it appears quite a number do the same too.
__________________

__________________
Moscyn is offline   Reply With Quote
Join the #1 Early Retirement and Financial Independence Forum Today - It's Totally Free!

Are you planning to be financially independent as early as possible so you can live life on your own terms? Discuss successful investing strategies, asset allocation models, tax strategies and other related topics in our online forum community. Our members range from young folks just starting their journey to financial independence, military retirees and even multimillionaires. No matter where you fit in you'll find that Early-Retirement.org is a great community to join. Best of all it's totally FREE!

You are currently viewing our boards as a guest so you have limited access to our community. Please take the time to register and you will gain a lot of great new features including; the ability to participate in discussions, network with our members, see fewer ads, upload photographs, create a retirement blog, send private messages and so much, much more!

Old 09-18-2013, 09:20 AM   #22
Recycles dryer sheets
Willers's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2013
Posts: 480
The key for me has been to stay up once I reach my destination, especially when heading east to Europe. No naps, no down time, then going to sleep at 8 or 9 PM local time and getting a solid 10 hours of sleep. I know that doesn't work for everyone, but it has for me. I also try for red eyes whenever I can adjust the sleep schedule more easily (I fall asleep easily on planes so daytime flights really mess with my clock).

When I've had to stay up late at my destination it's undone much of this. I try to sneak out when I can.
__________________

__________________
Willers is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-18-2013, 10:25 AM   #23
Administrator
W2R's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: New Orleans
Posts: 38,846
Quote:
Originally Posted by Moscyn View Post
I also find Red Eye flights are especially cold. Don't know why the air cond is blasting cold. I need to be snug and warm in order to sleep. The flight blankets are also quite thin ( except for those on business or first class). Well, I'll be taking a 13- hr flight from Hong Kong to Paris next week and I hope my usual Xanax will help me sleep at least 6 hours. I thought I am one of those few who resort to medication but it appears quite a number do the same too.
Not me. I have never taken medication of any kind to sleep, whether prescription or OTC, whether at home or traveling. Oh my, there's an area of expertise that I have but hadn't identified! I am really, really good at sleeping. Too bad that skill isn't worth some money, somehow.

Long ago I was told that they turn down the oxygen and temperature on airplanes at night in an effort to encourage passengers to sleep (less work for the flight crew that way). Don't know if that is true or not, but it is what it is. Maybe you could tuck one of those fleece truckers' blankets in your carry-on to provide a little added warmth to what you can get from the flight blankets. They don't take much space.
__________________
Already we are boldly launched upon the deep; but soon we shall be lost in its unshored, harbourless immensities.

- - H. Melville, 1851
W2R is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-18-2013, 11:37 AM   #24
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
Marita40's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2011
Location: St. Paul
Posts: 1,117
I fly to Rome every so often and the direct flight gets there around 8 a.m. I never sleep on planes--just can't do it, although I might doze lightly for a little while. I do exactly what Willers states. I play "mind over matter" and just tell myself that I can function for a day on no sleep, and I proceed to keep active all day and eat regular meals. I then turn in early--7 or 8 p.m.--and always sleep very well, waking up refreshed. This tends to solve my jet lag problems completely for the duration of the trip. Granted, this is only to Europe. I don't know how I'd handle a longer trip. Probably not well.
__________________
Marita40 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-18-2013, 12:25 PM   #25
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Posts: 1,988
Quote:
Originally Posted by W2R View Post
Long ago I was told that they turn down the oxygen and temperature on airplanes at night in an effort to encourage passengers to sleep (less work for the flight crew that way). Don't know if that is true or not, but it is what it is.
I also heard this from a flight attendant a few years ago.

omni
__________________
omni550 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-18-2013, 07:54 PM   #26
Full time employment: Posting here.
Moscyn's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Posts: 728
Quote:
Originally Posted by W2R View Post

Long ago I was told that they turn down the oxygen and temperature on airplanes at night in an effort to encourage passengers to sleep (less work for the flight crew that way). Don't know if that is true or not, but it is what it is. Maybe you could tuck one of those fleece truckers' blankets in your carry-on to provide a little added warmth to what you can get from the flight blankets. They don't take much space.
In my past few trips, I have resorted to taking along a thin down feather jacket which is really comfy. Also, it can be folded to a small square and easy to carry plus light.
__________________
Moscyn is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-18-2013, 08:57 PM   #27
Recycles dryer sheets
check6's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Posts: 383
Quote:
Originally Posted by W2R View Post
Long ago I was told that they turn down the oxygen and temperature on airplanes at night in an effort to encourage passengers to sleep (less work for the flight crew that way). Don't know if that is true or not....
It is not true. The amount of oxygen is based on what the pressurized cabin altitude is, normally 5-8,000 feet and that system is run automatically based on what altitude the aircraft is at the time.

On older aircraft, the temperature is controlled in the cockpit. There are gauges that tell the temp in various cabin zones. The pilots set it based on what they "think" the temperature should be until the flight attendants tell them to turn it up or down.

If you are cold or hot TELL the flight attendants. On the newer aircraft like the Airbus 330, the flt atts can control the temp from a panel in their galley.
__________________

__________________
check6 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


 

 
All times are GMT -6. The time now is 09:52 PM.
 
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.