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Old 04-29-2014, 02:30 PM   #41
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This is not my choice, but an Italian fellow I met in the USA recently told me he loved waffles and has them every morning while in the USA. I don't think I have ever seen a breakfast waffle in Italy, plenty of delicious pizzelli, but not breakfast waffles.
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Old 04-30-2014, 08:35 PM   #42
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There was a place in northern Laos with a small menu, and two of the items on it were "mole" and "large lizard". (Don't you just hate when you order lizard and you get one of those little ones!) Neither my friends nor I ordered either of those items, but who knows what they actually served us. It was the only bad meal I've ever had in SE Asia, and it definitely did not taste like chicken, which is what I ordered.
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Old 04-30-2014, 08:54 PM   #43
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.. it definitely did not taste like chicken, which is what I ordered.
Uh Oh!

Perhaps next time, you could insist on seeing before your eyes a live chicken being killed and cleaned.
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Old 04-30-2014, 09:04 PM   #44
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Shashlik in Kazakhstan! Giant skewers of random meat cooked over a fire and brought to the table heaped over small plates.
We've cooked it since then, using a recipe from the Internet, but nothing matches the memory of a real hot meal after too many days of ramen noodles and cereal bars.
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Old 04-30-2014, 09:14 PM   #45
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Silvanas, a refrigerated cookie from the Philippines. Three bites of pure mouth happy that go better with robusta bean coffee than anything else I've tried.
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Old 04-30-2014, 09:59 PM   #46
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Another SE Asia food story. A friend and I were biking along the east coast of Malaysia. We'd stop at little roadside places for food and drink. Many of them had baskets on the tables of something edible rolled up in banana leaves. If you wanted one, you just took it, opened it up, and later paid for it. After seeing these for a few days, we decided to try one. It was filled with a delicious mixture of sweetened rice & coconut. The next day we stopped at another place which had the baskets on the tables with the banana leaf rollups. We each took one, expecting the rice & coconut mixture. It turned out to be rice & fish. It was good, but not the sweet treat we were expecting.

In a town in far northern Laos a stone's throw from China, there was a restaurant which served wonderful thick pancakes made of cooked sticky rice mixed with chopped up hot peppers. They sauteed the thick pancakes so the outside got crispy but the inside remained chewy. They were wonderful.
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Old 05-01-2014, 09:36 AM   #47
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Interesting thread, I had to think on it a while.

I decided it is really the little things I've tasted while traveling that I miss. Since we are near a major city, we pretty much can get any foreign meal we want. I loved the Korean food I had in Seoul (after getting warnings from some other less adventurous co-workers). And the places I've found in the city, and even the suburbs are close enough for me (though a gas flame is more common here than charcoal at the table, but gas was also used in Seoul). Even the super-market variety Kim-chee is good, though you don't get the variety you get from a good restaurant.

And I can get German and Irish food here, could probably seek out haggis if I really wanted (had it, it was OK, but I'm not going out of my way to order it). All seemed pretty close to what I had in those places.

But now I remember getting some little sweet-bean filled cookie-like things that we bought from a street vendor in Seoul. They poured a kind of waffle-batter into a metal mold that was fish-shaped (and flipped open/close like a waffle maker), scooped some bean paste into it, more batter on top (or the other side, can't recall), and closed the mold to finish cooking.


Hmmmm, the warm, sweet bean paste and crisp, fresh cooked batter made a delicious little snack. Sweet bean paste is maybe a little like a thick plum filling. I have not seen those even in the Asian pastry shops here (they have some sweet bean filled pastries, but not these type), I finally found the name of them (I'd have to search my hard drive for it now), and I made something similar, but not the same. The next street vendor had boiled(?) silk worms. My co-worker wan't up to the challenge, so we passed on that. But those little bean cookie things were awesome!

Same with some little things in Ireland - breakfast stood out for me as a little 'treat'. I don't care for some of their sausages, but their bacon (rasher) is different and very good. Never had Irish style bacon here. I don't know why, but potatoes in Ireland are subtly better than any I've had anywhere else.

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Old 05-01-2014, 11:31 AM   #48
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Ema datchi in Bhutan,some of the hottest food I have experienced.And ika mata in Rarotonga,the best citrus marinated fish I have eaten.Tried to make both of these dishes at home and even after searching out good ingredients my efforts were just not as good as the originals.
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Old 05-01-2014, 11:47 AM   #49
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I remember having Arrosticini while in Italy. We bought about 4 skewers each (they are rather small) and BBQ's them over this long narrow troughs. I am not sure why the sheep has to be castrated. Here's a description:

Quote:
made from castrated sheep's meat (mutton), cut in chunks and pierced by a skewer. It is cooked on a brazier with a typically elongated shape, called canala as it resembles a gutter.
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Old 05-01-2014, 11:52 AM   #50
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I had to look up "Arrosticini" to be sure that the meat is not the part that is cut off.

It is not! So, perhaps the castrated mutton is less gamy. Note that it is mutton meat and not lamb.
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Old 05-01-2014, 12:59 PM   #51
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I had to look up "Arrosticini" to be sure that the meat is not the part that is cut off.

It is not! So, perhaps the castrated mutton is less gamy. Note that it is mutton meat and not lamb.
That's what I was wondering as well. He said they were small!

OK, not really 'foreign', but AFAIK, you cannot get beignets outside of New Orleans. At least I've never seen them. And as wonderful as they are fresh out of the fryer, I also recall taking some back to the hotel room, and you just don't want to eat them later. And this was probably just hours later.

They are just a bit of dough, deep fried and topped with powdered sugar. I'm not big on such things, but these were just wonderful. I could go for some a few times a year as a treat, if I could find them.



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Old 05-01-2014, 03:36 PM   #52
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But now I remember getting some little sweet-bean filled cookie-like things that we bought from a street vendor in Seoul. They poured a kind of waffle-batter into a metal mold that was fish-shaped (and flipped open/close like a waffle maker), scooped some bean paste into it, more batter on top (or the other side, can't recall), and closed the mold to finish cooking.
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Try looking inside of your local Korean mega store (Super-H Mart or Assi plaza comes to mind).
The frequently have stalls with Bungeoppang
My kids love it, especially now when the old man who makes these told them, that they can have chocolate filling instead of bean paste.
Instant happiness to the young sailors
In Japan they are called Taiyaki
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Old 05-01-2014, 04:47 PM   #53
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Try looking inside of your local Korean mega store (Super-H Mart or Assi plaza comes to mind).
The frequently have stalls with Bungeoppang
My kids love it, especially now when the old man who makes these told them, that they can have chocolate filling instead of bean paste.
Instant happiness to the young sailors
In Japan they are called Taiyaki
Yes! That is it. Now at least I now what to ask for.

Here's a video with links to the recipe for the sweet beans. I winged it for a recipe I made, and it was close. I did look for these in the Korean Mega-Mart near us (Matsuwa - I didn't try H-Mart). That is where they had other bean filled pastry, but not these fish cakes. But in the video, she says they are only good warm/fresh.

Not sure I want to buy the pan for such occasional use. I suppose I could get the same basic flavor (w/o the cool fish shape) with DW's Æbleskiver pan.

Fish-shaped bread with sweet red bean filling (Bungeoppang) recipe - Maangchi.com

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Old 05-01-2014, 05:14 PM   #54
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It seems that there really are a lot of people who would eat something that I would push across the table as fast as I could. Good curry is about it for me. I spent 5 years in Okinawa.......really didn't find much I could eat "willingly". I tried raw fish a couple of times....tasted ok, texture left something to be desired. Yoka Soba at one place was my fav. Other attempts got me soups that had floating tentacles/eye balls/etc that......well......I guess I am inhibited. But the Soba place just outside the N Gates of Torii Station ......mmmmm. Especially after a dive. Now.....there was a Pepper Steak place outside Giessen in Germany..........THAT, would be the meal I would want once a week.
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Old 05-01-2014, 06:45 PM   #55
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Bermuda Gold liqueur (loquat fruit liqueur).

A very inexpensive dark chocolate from the Amsterdam equivalent of Target (their in-store brand). Wow! Best dark chocolate ever for $2.
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Old 05-01-2014, 09:03 PM   #56
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All this talk of korean food is making me hungry.

What I miss most is Gimbap. My mother used to make huge batches of this which I just devoured. Sometimes korean grocery stores have this but right now I'm in an ethnic food desert.

I also like Jajangmyeon noodles but I don't recall seeing it very often in restaurants in the US. Koreans considered this a chinese dish, but I don't think it's really from china (probably "chinese inspired")

I've also never seen bindaetteok in korean restaurants (I've only had it homemade and it didn't look like the picture in wikipedia). Usually korean restaurants will have the more common pajeon. However pajeon is made with flour where as bindaetteok is made from ground mung bean so it has a very different consistency.

Hotteok is typically a street food (pancake with melted brown sugar filling). I tried making this but it was a disaster. Probably for the best since it's not very healthy.
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Old 05-01-2014, 09:28 PM   #57
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Saoto soep. Javanese soup from Suriname. Best place is at Waspada, near the Alcoa plant, in fact the only place to eat near there.
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Old 05-04-2014, 07:39 PM   #58
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There are quite a few dishes or food items mentioned in this thread that I have not heard of. Asian countries have quite a few pastries or rice cakes that are fairly unique.

Here's a list of "50 Best Foods in the World" that I ran across a while back. Look through it, and you will find quite a few familiar items. There's no explanation on how the listed foods were selected.

PS. Hah! There was no list as I forgot to attach it.

Now there is. See: World's 50 Best Foods.
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Old 05-06-2014, 07:44 PM   #59
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Cola Nuts. While hitchhiking around Zaire around 30 years ago (yes I had a life even before FIRE) you would see in markets people with a plank with mounds of earth. Inside the mounds were Cola Nuts. They were kept in earth because they oxidize rapidly in air. They were about the size of an avocado pit as I remember but were whiteish. They were a favorite when sitting around a bar and drinking beer. You would nibble on the nut, just a scrape and the white flesh would turn florescent pink in front of your eyes (the oxidation part). They were VERY bitter and were an acquired taste, but went well with the local beer (take that all you wine and cheese snobs).

Every time I saw that old 7 Up commercial (These are Cola Nuts, These are Un Cola Nuts...) I would long for a beer and a Cola Nut.
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Old 05-06-2014, 08:26 PM   #60
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It's not a foreign food, and folks in New York State are welcome to laugh. A Genesee Cream Ale would be a real treat. You might find it out here, every couple of years, with luck.

Last 6 pack I found was $9.99, I used to buy it for $0.99.

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