Join Early Retirement Today
Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 07-21-2008, 07:26 PM   #41
Full time employment: Posting here.
flipstress's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Posts: 537
Thanks for sharing, Sarah--fascinating pictures!

I look forward to reading your travelogue and listening to your NPR interview this weekend, when I can leisurely enjoy them with a nice cup of hot coffee...
__________________

__________________
flipstress is offline   Reply With Quote
Join the #1 Early Retirement and Financial Independence Forum Today - It's Totally Free!

Are you planning to be financially independent as early as possible so you can live life on your own terms? Discuss successful investing strategies, asset allocation models, tax strategies and other related topics in our online forum community. Our members range from young folks just starting their journey to financial independence, military retirees and even multimillionaires. No matter where you fit in you'll find that Early-Retirement.org is a great community to join. Best of all it's totally FREE!

You are currently viewing our boards as a guest so you have limited access to our community. Please take the time to register and you will gain a lot of great new features including; the ability to participate in discussions, network with our members, see fewer ads, upload photographs, create a retirement blog, send private messages and so much, much more!

Old 07-21-2008, 09:02 PM   #42
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
simple girl's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Posts: 2,505
Wow, what an adventure! Some of the pictures of the landscape seemed surreal. I love how you got to intermingle with the locals. And I'm sure riding on the camel was an interesting experience!

The accommodations ("roughing it") only makes it all the more interesting.

Overall, how safe did you feel traveling there?
__________________

__________________
simple girl
less stuff, more time

(49, married; DH 53. I am fully retired as of 2015 (well ok, I still work part-time but only because I love the job and have complete freedom to call off if I want to travel with hubby for work), DH hopes to fully retire 2018 when he turns 55 to access 401K penalty-free...although he may decide to do part-time consulting)
simple girl is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-21-2008, 10:08 PM   #43
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
bbbamI's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Dallas 'burb
Posts: 9,039
When I first saw the title to your thread, I thought it was going to be about a recipe....

Seriously, thank you so much for sharing your trip info and pics with us.
__________________
There's no need to complicate, our time is short..
bbbamI is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-22-2008, 08:16 AM   #44
Moderator
Sarah in SC's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Charleston, SC
Posts: 13,456
Quote:
Originally Posted by simple girl View Post
Overall, how safe did you feel traveling there?
Amazingly so. The only place there is any danger at all of pickpockets is in Ulaanbaatar, and even there we never saw any sort of sketchy people. Otherwise it is really a very safe place, we didn't even see any car accidents--which is surprising considering how scary driving is in the city! Reminded us of Kingston, Jamaica!

Another point for you animal lovers like me: in every developing country we've ever visited, animals (from cats and dogs to farm livestock) have been in mostly poor condition due to the simple economics of living. In Mongolia, where the per capita income is quite low, the animals ruled. We saw many dogs crossing the street, and many people crossing the street--the cars would invariably stop for the dogs but not the people! All the dogs we saw were healthy and sound, and did not bother the livestock at all (if they are well fed, there is no need). We saw a big tough Mongolian driver at a ger restaurant reach down and pet a cat gentlythat came strolling by. We saw three little boys (their families were on vacation from the city), say 8-12 years old, gingerly carrying around an adorable kitten at the Huvsgol camp, asking if it belonged to any of the tourists there. It turned out to be the camp cat, and those boys spent hours playing with her.

I don't know if it is the Buddhist influence, but life has a significant value to Mongolians and they seem to treat all animals as they do humans, with kindness and respect. This is a relief to tender folks like us, who are often disturbed by the careless callousness that sometimes accompanies poverty in other countries we have visited.
__________________
“One day your life will flash before your eyes. Make sure it's worth watching.”
Gerard Arthur Way

Sarah in SC is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-22-2008, 08:38 AM   #45
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
simple girl's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Posts: 2,505
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sarah in SC View Post
Amazingly so. The only place there is any danger at all of pickpockets is in Ulaanbaatar, and even there we never saw any sort of sketchy people. Otherwise it is really a very safe place, we didn't even see any car accidents--which is surprising considering how scary driving is in the city! Reminded us of Kingston, Jamaica!

Another point for you animal lovers like me: in every developing country we've ever visited, animals (from cats and dogs to farm livestock) have been in mostly poor condition due to the simple economics of living. In Mongolia, where the per capita income is quite low, the animals ruled. We saw many dogs crossing the street, and many people crossing the street--the cars would invariably stop for the dogs but not the people! All the dogs we saw were healthy and sound, and did not bother the livestock at all (if they are well fed, there is no need). We saw a big tough Mongolian driver at a ger restaurant reach down and pet a cat gentlythat came strolling by. We saw three little boys (their families were on vacation from the city), say 8-12 years old, gingerly carrying around an adorable kitten at the Huvsgol camp, asking if it belonged to any of the tourists there. It turned out to be the camp cat, and those boys spent hours playing with her.

I don't know if it is the Buddhist influence, but life has a significant value to Mongolians and they seem to treat all animals as they do humans, with kindness and respect. This is a relief to tender folks like us, who are often disturbed by the careless callousness that sometimes accompanies poverty in other countries we have visited.
That is so cool. Really sounds like such an interesting place to visit!

I'm not so sure the way they treat animals has to do with the Buddhist influence, though, since when we were in Thailand there were many stray dogs and cats that did not appear in great condition. However, I never saw direct mistreatment at all - just seemed more a fact of economics, like you said, I think. So perhaps it is just something more ingrained in their culture itself? Interesting.

Oh, one more question - what was the temperature/weather like there?
__________________
simple girl
less stuff, more time

(49, married; DH 53. I am fully retired as of 2015 (well ok, I still work part-time but only because I love the job and have complete freedom to call off if I want to travel with hubby for work), DH hopes to fully retire 2018 when he turns 55 to access 401K penalty-free...although he may decide to do part-time consulting)
simple girl is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-22-2008, 09:01 AM   #46
Moderator
Sarah in SC's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Charleston, SC
Posts: 13,456
Temp/weather varies by time of year--I definitely don't want to be there in the winter, it is -40C in UB!
Summer is really nice, the desert was in the 80s most days, as we moved further north it got colder but still quite dry. We had a couple of days with afternoon rain, typical for rainy season, but not much humidity. Closer to the Siberian border it was downright cold for us. From about the middle of the country north, it was cold enough for a fire in the ger at night, and fleeces during the day. I think the season for visitors runs from about June (when you can go to the Yak Festival in Khongor-Tsaaten Tsaagen National Park) to about mid-September.

I think it really is more cultural, they show the same fondness for animals as they do children, and older folks are revered for their wisdom. The matriarch of families has a tremendous influence in the community and women have many more opportunities for education and jobs than I expected.
__________________
“One day your life will flash before your eyes. Make sure it's worth watching.”
Gerard Arthur Way

Sarah in SC is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-23-2008, 08:13 PM   #47
Moderator Emeritus
Martha's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: minnesota
Posts: 13,212
What an amazing adventure! The pictures are extraordinary.
__________________
.


No more lawyer stuff, no more political stuff, so no more CYA

Martha is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-23-2008, 10:15 PM   #48
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
bright eyed's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Posts: 1,891
Amazing! how wonderful and inspiring - i hope to travel like that some day! Thanks for sharing...i can live vicariously in the mean time....
__________________
If i think of something clever to say, i'll put it here...
bright eyed is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-23-2008, 11:06 PM   #49
gone traveling
 
Join Date: May 2008
Posts: 3,864
Great Pictures! What an adventure!
__________________
Westernskies is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-27-2008, 01:49 PM   #50
Recycles dryer sheets
 
Join Date: Dec 2002
Posts: 78
Very nice, Thanks!!!!!!!!
__________________
tjon72 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-27-2008, 06:58 PM   #51
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
Free To Canoe's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: Cooksburg,PA
Posts: 1,738
Sarah,

Thanks for sharing! What a great adventure.

Free to Canoe
__________________
Free To Canoe is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-27-2008, 07:18 PM   #52
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Posts: 11,018
Wonderful travelogue Sarah, thank you! Possible ER pursuit?

One of my colleagues was in Mongolia concurrently with you, climbing. She fell into three crevasses, and came home with snow blindness.

People seem to be at their most friendly in less travelled places! I admit I would not be up for that trip. I like my creature comforts.
__________________
Meadbh is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-28-2008, 12:29 PM   #53
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
lazygood4nothinbum's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Posts: 3,895
don't know how i missed this sarah. i must not have been in the travel section. what a great trip. thanx for sharing. good interview too. was curious to hear hansen trip up slightly in questioning you. seems you impressed even npr. nice job.
__________________
"off with their heads"~~dr. joseph-ignace guillotin

"life should begin with age and its privileges and accumulations, and end with youth and its capacity to splendidly enjoy such advantages."~~mark twain - letter to edward kimmitt 1901
lazygood4nothinbum is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-28-2008, 12:34 PM   #54
Moderator
Sarah in SC's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Charleston, SC
Posts: 13,456
Awww, thanks!
I was mighty nervous talking to her, Lazy. But since we'd been up drinking like locals the night before (do not ever buy a $5 bottle of vodka, even if it has Chinnghis Khan's picture on it), I tried very hard to be especially coherent!

Wow Mead, I'm glad we weren't trying anything so extreme--snow blindness sounds terrible. Has she recovered?
__________________
“One day your life will flash before your eyes. Make sure it's worth watching.”
Gerard Arthur Way

Sarah in SC is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-28-2008, 11:42 PM   #55
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
NW-Bound's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Posts: 19,420
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sarah in SC View Post
They are way tough hombres! I read somewhere that the Mongol army would run out of provisions, so they would keep going and just cut their horses necks open, drink some of the blood, and soldier on.

Can you imagine that Chingghis' army made it all the way to Vienna? And if it hadn't been for the death of the existing Khan that caused them all to turn around and go back home, I suspect they would have sacked all of Europe, and not just Russia, the Middle East, and the rest of Asia in the 15th century!
It was the 13th century. Tough as the Mongol were, they were not invincible. It took me some time to rediscover the following excerpt quoted below, referring to Kublai Khan, the grandson of Chingghis Khan, from a book I read a while ago.

"During the 13th century, the Mongol emperor Kublai Khan invaded Vietnam three times, pushing south to control the spice routes of the Indonesian archipelago. The Vietnamese, commanded by the illustrious Tran Hung Dao, repulsed each offensive. In the last great battle, which took place in the Red River valley in 1287, the Vietnamese routed 300,000 Mongol troops." Stanley Karnow. Vietnam - A History, 1991, p.113
__________________
NW-Bound is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 07-29-2008, 01:52 AM   #56
Full time employment: Posting here.
shiny's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Posts: 673
I finally got a chance to log in and look at the photos - awesome Sarah!

A friend of ours here in Japan keeps talking about how great he thinks Mongolia is - he even made a documentary while he was there. I'll have to keep it in mind for a future trip while we are here in Asia.
__________________
I'm made of atoms, you're made of atoms, and we're all in this together. Ben Lee
shiny is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-29-2008, 08:21 AM   #57
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
Eagle43's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: DFW
Posts: 1,883
Thanks for the great report and great pics. You're adventuresome to say the least.
__________________
Resist much. Obey Little. . . . Ed Abbey

Disclaimer: My Posts are for my amusement only.
Eagle43 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-29-2008, 06:50 PM   #58
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Posts: 11,018
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sarah in SC View Post
Wow Mead, I'm glad we weren't trying anything so extreme--snow blindness sounds terrible. Has she recovered?
She's getting better, thank you, and planning a parachute jump for charity
__________________
Meadbh is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-12-2008, 01:15 AM   #59
Full time employment: Posting here.
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Posts: 607
Sarah, incredible trip! Thank you so much for sharing! I'll admit, Mongolia not the next country of my list, but I'd definitely like to go sometime.

Call me an NPR nerd, but I've very impressed with the interview. What's next? A job with Globe Trekker?
__________________
WanderALot is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-12-2008, 08:20 AM   #60
Moderator
Sarah in SC's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Charleston, SC
Posts: 13,456
Thanks so much, Wander! I loved doing the interview, though I was mighty nervous and our connection was terrible!

With all the press (thanks to the Olympics) about visiting China and the incredible cultural treasures on offer, it occurs to me that I don't really want to go there, but I loved Mongolia. I think this is due to the sparse population of Mongolia (the least populous country on earth). There is so much open land that people are not crowded into dense urban areas. They also seem to appreciate their short warm season very much--since much of the winter is spent indoors.

Even in the one big city of UB, the outdoor parks were busy, active places, with lots of families getting exercise and enjoying themselves. I saw truly ancient people climbing the billion stairs up to the old Russian Friendship monument that has a great view of the city and surrounding mountains. The old folks struggled, but they still climbed the stairs, assisted by several generations of family, from the looks of it. Strong family connections and wonderfully independent kids everywhere you looked.
__________________

__________________
“One day your life will flash before your eyes. Make sure it's worth watching.”
Gerard Arthur Way

Sarah in SC is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Adventure Vacation Khan Other topics 2 06-09-2008 10:25 PM
A different adventure begins..... LeatherneckPA Other topics 18 05-12-2008 11:35 AM
My Adventure in FI (but not RE) Culture FIRE and Money 8 02-17-2008 09:55 PM
Travel Insurance and Mongolia Sarah in SC Travel Information 6 09-28-2007 11:14 AM
The next adventure dory36 Life after FIRE 44 02-15-2007 06:26 AM

 

 
All times are GMT -6. The time now is 12:35 AM.
 
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.