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Old 12-05-2011, 04:58 PM   #41
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I've been saying for years that Canada is a socialist, not a democratic, country.
I's just like to point out that socialism and democracy aren't mutually exclusive. I think Canada actually has a mixed economy as the state doesn't own the means of production, but does regulate in many areas.
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Old 12-05-2011, 07:30 PM   #42
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Comax is a popular community for retirees.
I think it's Comox.....
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Old 12-05-2011, 09:04 PM   #43
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I think it's Comox.....
I wasn't going to say.
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Old 12-05-2011, 09:15 PM   #44
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Healthcare always has to be paid for, Canada just does it in a very different way from the US so that Canadians aren't aware of paying for treatment when they need it.

The UK system is paid for by general taxation and is "free at the point of service" so patients never see a bill......this is a big plus in my book. I had an outpatient surgery in the US a few years ago and the level of care was good and it cost me $250 in total for various tests and deductibles. However, the volume of paperwork that I received afterwards was ridiculous.....no wonder the US system costs so much more than other 1st world systems
So true. The Canadian system has the virtue of simplicity. Highly desirable, especially when we get older and more irritable.

Full disclosure: I am a happy customer. The Canadian health care system saved my life when my appendix disintegrated in the middle of the night.

Please do be aware that scarce resources are allocated. There is a point with older people where decisions are made as to who gets treated and who does not. Even so, because the US is close by, many have the option to get treatment south of the border. It is nice to have options like that.

The more I think about it, the more I want to go back.
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Old 12-05-2011, 09:28 PM   #45
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Cost of living in Vancouver: bring lots of money

Buying a home in Vancouver is expensive. My nephew just bought a tiny starter home for $499,000.

Condos start at about $200K

Rents are $900 and up

The price of gas is a killer: it was $1.30/litre this morning - about $4.50/gallon.

The cost of food is about the same as in the US - although you have more variety

Because of the mild winters, you don't need much in the way of winter clothes.

Cars are more expensive than in the US but they last longer - we don't get rust on our cars. Mine is 11 years old and still looks like it came from the showroom (except for the side panel when I took out a post...sigh!)
Please be aware that the greater Vancouver area is a housing bubble waiting to pop. It is just that no-one knows when. Once residency/citizenship is established, it would be a lot cheaper to move to Washington State, just across the border. Commuting is tedious, but I did it for a year, every day. There are four border crossings (not including Point Roberts, which doesn't get you anywhere). It would be possible to live aboard a boat, too.

And you can always drive down to Bellingham Costco to buy gas. Everybody in BC does.

It snows in BC. Sometimes a lot. Right down to the border--then it stops. I have a beautiful set of mounted almost-new winter tires (*) for a 6-bolt Chevy Astro that I will part with. The Astro can go with them, too.

(*) Winter tires are NOT snow tires. They are a soft compound rubber like silicone that does not get rigid in extreme cold. Do not drive on them when the temperature is more than about 40F. There is a big difference between them and any other tire.
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Old 12-05-2011, 10:33 PM   #46
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Cost of living in Vancouver: bring lots of money

Buying a home in Vancouver is expensive. My nephew just bought a tiny starter home for $499,000.

Condos start at about $200K

Rents are $900 and up

The price of gas is a killer: it was $1.30/litre this morning - about $4.50/gallon.
Sounds like a bargain compared to silicon valley

For the OP, I first worked in the US on a NAFTA permit and it was a very easy process. There is a list of approved professions (engineering is one of them) and you just have to show up at the border with a carefully worded letter of employment. I assume (but am not completely sure) that the process to come to canada from the US would be similar.
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