Early Retirement & Financial Independence Community

Early Retirement & Financial Independence Community (http://www.early-retirement.org/forums/)
-   Life after FIRE (http://www.early-retirement.org/forums/f29/)
-   -   You retirees w/ 10+ years experience, what's next? (http://www.early-retirement.org/forums/f29/you-retirees-w-10-years-experience-whats-next-14218.html)

Nords 12-11-2003 07:02 PM

You retirees w/ 10+ years experience, what's next?
 
Here's the questions to the description below: Were any of you in this situation 10 years ago? How has it worked out? Any surprises or other issues to watch out for? Anything you'd do differently?

Here's the description:

Am I missing something here in Paradise?

I ER'd 18 months ago (age 42) on a small govt pension that permits lifetime unemployment. Married, kid finishing elementary school, frugal lifestyle, with a retirement portfolio (& spouse's pension) overcapitalized to survive at least another six decades. We've survived & prospered through the bear market (so far). Life is good & worry-free.

Life is busy, too. Parenting, home improvement, exercising, reading, investing, and surfing (both ocean & Internet) more than fill our days and leave us happily exhausted by nightfall. Our to-do list is getting longer, not shorter. With all of these compelling interests, I can't imagine how I used to find the time to go to work.

Work was fulfilling and (mostly) enjoyable, but I don't miss it a bit. During the retirement process, we were heavily conditioned on how to seek further employment. Admittedly most of my less-frugal compatriots, with more kids and debts, will be employed for another 20+ years. And some of the others just can't imagine NOT being employed. One or two have even tried to retire and gone groveling back to their offices. But my father & father-in-law, my mentors, have been happily retired for 17 & 8 years with no issues. I feel lucky to have their help in overcoming the brainwashing.

So I can't believe that it's been 18 months already. I don't miss commuting, business clothes, meetings, suffering fools gladly, and 50-hour workweeks. I enjoy the tasks we've set before us but I can see that they'll dwindle in the next five years. I'm pretty sure that new interests will arise (and our kid will be a licensed driver by then!) so I don't see life getting less busy.

What the heck is my problem, right? Well, I'm a bit surprised to discover that I don't have one. Apparently I rightfully ignored the "You'll be so BORED!" and "But what will you DO all day?!?" warnings and I'm happy to say that I see plenty of self-imposed challenges in my busy future. I don't think I'll never chase a paycheck again and I don't think I'll ever revert to the office environment. I raise this issue more from an engineer's paranoia than from angst.

Advice? Comments?

unclemick 12-12-2003 04:08 AM

Re: You retirees w/ 10+ years experience, what's n
 
Will be eleven years in january 04. Engineers paranoia? Maybe - but luckily a tornado took the roof off in 95 and Hurricane George the front and back porch in 98 so the remodeling juices got satisfied. Also took a temp job for 14 months in 95-96 which more than paid for the remodeling.

I keep in touch - our retiree's group meets once a month and they are always looking for volunteer's to judge school science fairs - which I avoid like the plague.

It's amazing how fast the day goes 'doing nothing'. The desire to design, build, experiment surfaces periodically but it passes. Aerospace 1966 - 1992 ER'd Jan 1993.

John Galt 12-13-2003 07:24 AM

Re: You retirees w/ 10+ years experience, what's n
 
Hello! Semiretired since 1993. My situation is just
like cut-throat. As one activity is dropped (due to age or whatever), there is always a big list of others that
I want to try, or maybe just do more of. I expect this
will continue until my demise. I recall once that my brother asked my parents "But what does he do all day?" That made me smile.

John Galt

John Galt 12-18-2003 02:25 AM

Re: You retirees w/ 10+ years experience, what's n
 
Now here's a typical day (winter schedule):

Coffee with the wife before she leaves for work.
Feed and water livestock (read dogs).
Check e-mail.
Spend some time on financial/business issues.
Run errands/finish Christmas shopping.
Kill some time at Barnes and Noble.
Pick up mail/lunch with folks.
Clean up/fix up around house (househusband duties).
Exploring the woods with my black lab, Maggie.
Wife returns/cocktail hour and conversation.
Evening news, then a good book or video and/or back on the computer.

Summer schedule is similar, except add in boating, fishing, motorcycle and putzing in the yard.

Sure beats workin' !

John Galt

Nords 01-25-2010 12:47 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Nords (Post 262359)
I ER'd 18 months ago (age 42) on a small govt pension that permits lifetime unemployment. Married, kid finishing elementary school, frugal lifestyle, with a retirement portfolio (& spouse's pension) overcapitalized to survive at least another six decades. We've survived & prospered through the bear market (so far). Life is good & worry-free.

195 days until that elementary-school kid starts college, but everything else is current. Gee, still recovering from the bear market, too.

The retirement portfolio is smaller but our cashflow is bigger due to a few rounds of mortgage refinancings and raising the tenant's rent.

Quote:

Originally Posted by Nords (Post 262359)
Life is busy, too. Parenting, home improvement, exercising, reading, investing, and surfing (both ocean & Internet) more than fill our days and leave us happily exhausted by nightfall. Our to-do list is getting longer, not shorter. With all of these compelling interests, I can't imagine how I used to find the time to go to work.
Work was fulfilling and (mostly) enjoyable, but I don't miss it a bit. During the retirement process, we were heavily conditioned on how to seek further employment. Admittedly most of my less-frugal compatriots, with more kids and debts, will be employed for another 20+ years. And some of the others just can't imagine NOT being employed. One or two have even tried to retire and gone groveling back to their offices. But my father & father-in-law, my mentors, have been happily retired for 17 & 8 years with no issues. I feel lucky to have their help in overcoming the brainwashing.
So I can't believe that it's been 18 months already. I don't miss commuting, business clothes, meetings, suffering fools gladly, and 50-hour workweeks. I enjoy the tasks we've set before us but I can see that they'll dwindle in the next five years. I'm pretty sure that new interests will arise (and our kid will be a licensed driver by then!) so I don't see life getting less busy.

No changes here.

From what I'm told, the military's transition-assistance planning seminars may be shorter and more efficiently delivered (online as well as in the classroom) but the content hasn't changed much: "Know your benefits, use your GI Bill, git a job."

Quote:

Originally Posted by Nords (Post 262359)
What the heck is my problem, right? Well, I'm a bit surprised to discover that I don't have one. Apparently I rightfully ignored the "You'll be so BORED!" and "But what will you DO all day?!?" warnings and I'm happy to say that I see plenty of self-imposed challenges in my busy future. I don't think I'll never chase a paycheck again and I don't think I'll ever revert to the office environment. I raise this issue more from an engineer's paranoia than from angst.

Never been an issue here, either. I suppose that in the next 10 years I might find some compelling reason to return to some sort of paid employment but... nah, not seein' it.

Quote:

Originally Posted by Nords (Post 262359)
Am I missing something here in Paradise?

Apparently not!

I remember that back then I was far more concerned about the finances of ER than I was about how I'd spend my time. Confidence rises with more ER time-- even after another round of bear market that concern has largely disappeared.

However my fears concerns about parenting a teenager were right on the money...

bbbamI 01-25-2010 12:59 PM

Hummm...this is an old thread....no 'hehs' from unclemick...

Gone4Good 01-26-2010 02:29 PM

Great post and follow-up. It's good to hear from folks who have managed ER successfully, both from a financial and an emotional stand point. It's certainly reassuring for someone who is going to take the plunge himself in a couple of weeks or so.

Congrats!

unclemick 01-26-2010 02:54 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by bbbamI (Post 896994)
Hummm...this is an old thread....no 'hehs' from unclemick...

heh heh heh -----PLUS:

When did I cut loose with the first pssst Wellesley?

heh heh heh - :coolsmiley: Boy I'm starting feel old. :whistling:

REWahoo 01-26-2010 03:10 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by unclemick (Post 897283)
When did I cut loose with the first pssst Wellesley?

Although it seems like it was several decades ago, it appears to have been less than 5 years: http://www.early-retirement.org/foru...tml#post296030

flyfishnevada 01-30-2010 12:15 AM

I thought someone was "thread mining", but you came back and answered your own question. Its funny. I have spoken with and read posts from a lot of folks that have retired and despite all the concerns, things just seem to work out and they enjoy it. Not that planning and a little constructive concern isn't a good thing, but maybe we tend to over think things a little. Like you, I'm an engineer too. Must come with the territory.

audreyh1 01-30-2010 07:01 AM

Pretty cool Nords! Congrats!!!!!

Audrey

FIYes 01-30-2010 01:40 PM

Wow Nords--this is so COOL! I saw the thread title and clicked on it since I am a 4 month newbie at retirement. I really enjoy retirement and I am surprised that I don't feel a need to more. I thought that I would need bunches of projects lined up to stave off boredom, but that is not the case at all. I hope that in a few years I look back and can say "yep, this is pretty good!"

BunsGettingFirm 01-31-2010 02:43 PM

Wow, almost 6 years went by since the original posting. For a 39-year-old guy, let's just say that ER used to be just a possibility somewhere in the future, but now it's more like if I can increase my portfolio by a manageable percentage through just my contributions, I can pull the plug. ;) Still, with ER a concrete, reachable goal in the next few year, it's feels strangely more difficult. It's nice to see a retrospective that ER isn't as difficult as some make it out to be.


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 11:56 PM.

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.