Early Retirement & Financial Independence Community

Early Retirement & Financial Independence Community (http://www.early-retirement.org/forums/)
-   Life after FIRE (http://www.early-retirement.org/forums/f29/)
-   -   Finding the perfect "Second Act" after ER (http://www.early-retirement.org/forums/f29/finding-the-perfect-second-act-after-er-51781.html)

cardude 08-24-2010 07:03 AM

Finding the perfect "Second Act" after ER
 
Midpack started a thread that got me thinking about finding the perfect second job after ER, and I was wondering if anyone has had any success with this?




As I explained on his thread, I'm having trouble finding the perfect "Second Act" after 20 years in a fairly specialized position (running a car dealership), and after 1.5yrs in ER. The only things I've been able to come up with so far, unfortunately, are car business related:
  1. First, I did some active wholesaling with one of my old car business contacts for a short time. It was interesting getting out of the house, but it was not really worth the hours I had to put in for the amount of money made. Plus, it seemed too much like work since it was car business related, like I was just hanging on to my old career and had no imagination, if you know what I mean.
  2. I'm currently doing some inactive wholesaling right now, where I simply back some existing wholesalers with my money, and they go out and do all the work. This is better, because there is no demand on my time, but so far the money is pretty small and it's not actually that rewarding, because it's still in the car business for crying out loud!
It seems I've lost much of my childlike imagination over the years, and that's making it difficult to come up with interesting things to do. Or, when I do come up with something that sounds interesting to me........
Starting a Baja Fish Taco stand only on W-TH-FRI and only in the evenings and not during the summer so our kids can learn the value of work and earn some extra change but so we can still travel all summer!! (as I explain breathlessly and excitedly to anyone who will listen)

just sounds goofy as hell when I try to describe it to people (especially DW).

Anyhoo, just wondering if any other folks have had any success starting up something new in ER, and if so what kind of stuff did you have to go through to get it going?

Moemg 08-24-2010 07:28 AM

I have mentioned several times how I started selling on ebay after I retired . I only do it part time usually six hours a week plus the mailing which takes just a few minutes and answering all the questions . For me it is the perfect retirement second act . I did not go into it for the money but as a way to keep active and engaged . I spent forty years in Nursing so to me this is an extremely low stress second act .

Nords 08-24-2010 08:38 AM

Once again the surfing must really suck over there.

Have you tapped out on Ernie Zelinski's "Get-A-Life" tree? It's on page 82 of the "search inside the book" link: Amazon.com: How to Retire Happy, Wild, and Free: Retirement Wisdom That You Won't Get from Your Financial Advisor (9780969419495): Ernie J. Zelinski: Books

Have you read Marc Freedman's "Encore"? The man can't even spell ER but he has good ideas about life after retirement the first career.

What's in your community for volunteering? Is there a state/local college with an entrepreneurship school/center, or a SBA office, or a SCORE or ENCORE chapter (http://www.encore.org/)? What about joining a community foundation/philanthropy organization or an angel-investing group?

Walt34 08-24-2010 09:32 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by cardude (Post 971190)
Anyhoo, just wondering if any other folks have had any success starting up something new in ER, and if so what kind of stuff did you have to go through to get it going?

I kind of ran into that issue too - "Where do I go from here?" We were careful to make sure all the numbers worked, but I didn't plan very well on what to do with me. DW adjusted a lot better than I did.

I did try some new things - you'd appreciate the irony that I was a flop as a car salesman - but at least it cleared up any notions of a 2nd career in sales.:laugh:

So for now I'm doing armed security at one of those government facilities discreetly set back from the road, and while the bulk of the extra/unplanned-for income goes to savings, I splurged on a motorcycle, a higher-end computer than I would have bought otherwise, and I've regained an interest in photography, since once you're past the entry costs digital photography is essentially free. Well, unless you print a lot.

But the job meets my other requirements of having a short commute, lack of unnecessary BS, very little paperwork, and no heavy lifting.

An interesting side note, perhaps deserving of it's own thread: At my request, yesterday the Alumni Association posted a note in the newsletter that there were four vacancies where I work. This morning alone I've received three E-mails from law enforcement retirees inquiring about the nature of the job, who to contact, etc.

So apparently not everyone wants to stay retired.

Nords 08-24-2010 09:59 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Walt34 (Post 971279)
So apparently not everyone wants to stay retired.

Or perhaps the recession robbed them of a choice...

cardude 08-24-2010 10:01 AM

Quote:

Once again the surfing must really suck over there.
Nords, you have no idea..............:nonono:

Texas in the summer is freakin TERRIBLE for surfers. Sometimes we will get some decent storm swell, but it's usually pretty dicey-- if the storm gets too close it's blown out VAS crap, and of course if it gets really close it blows all our houses away.

Current surfcam picture
Flagship Cam

Some folks go tanker surfing in the summer............
YouTube - Tanker Wave Surfing Texas_Wheat&Brian Very Nice Double Wave GBay IslandStyle 10 02 09
These dudes are just standing on their boards however-- no turns, nothing........what's up with that?

But yes, if I could get some decent surf all my problems would instantly, magically, vanish. Haven't caught a wave since June in Costa Rica.
http://www.early-retirement.org/atta...e56fc9c07d.jpg

Sue J 08-24-2010 10:08 AM

I started working as a School Crossing Guard after my "career" as a stay-at-home-mom. I initially did this to finish my Social Security credits but most of the other guards are retirees. Some need the money to live, others do it for fun or for the extra cash or just to have a reason to get out every day.

Except for the part where you stand in the street looking at oncoming cars it's very low stress, kind of pleasant and low impact on the rest of your life. The time commitment is so small that it lets you do other things.

Just started my 5th year, today is the first day of school.

CoolChange 08-24-2010 10:47 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Nords (Post 971242)
Have you read Marc Freedman's "Encore"? The man can't even spell ER but he has good ideas about life after retirement the first career.

Thanks for this. It looks interesting; I will be picking it up from my local library tomorrow.

dex 08-24-2010 12:38 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by cardude (Post 971190)
Anyhoo, just wondering if any other folks have had any success starting up something new in ER, and if so what kind of stuff did you have to go through to get it going?

You might try identifying the qualities the 'job' would have that would make you happy.

haha 08-24-2010 12:47 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by cardude (Post 971190)
The only things I've been able to come up with so far, unfortunately, are car business related...

Most of us only wish that our careers dealt with something as interesting as cars.
Quote:

Or, when I do come up with something that sounds interesting to me........
Starting a Baja Fish Taco stand only on W-TH-FRI and only in the evenings and not during the summer so our kids can learn the value of work and earn some extra change but so we can still travel all summer!! (as I explain breathlessly and excitedly to anyone who will listen)

just sounds goofy as hell when I try to describe it to people (especially DW).
The reason for that is it is goofy as hell. :) Maybe cars is best. You already know the territory. It's a huge part of the American economy, likely some niche will suit you and still be low time/stress.

I used to live in a community that had begun to attract well off early retirees many of whom quickly found themselves at sixes and sevens and started businesses. Most of these businesses were goofy as hell, unless they keyed off some service aspect of their former careers/businesses. A huge number just became dead businesses walking, and finally they quit walking too.

Ha

flyfishnevada 08-24-2010 01:15 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Nords (Post 971242)
Have you tapped out on Ernie Zelinski's "Get-A-Life" tree? It's on page 82 of the "search inside the book" link: Amazon.com: How to Retire Happy, Wild, and Free: Retirement Wisdom That You Won't Get from Your Financial Advisor (9780969419495): Ernie J. Zelinski: Books

+1 on the "Get-A-Life-Tree". Mine is more a of a bullet list, but it has about 60 things on it and many of those open further possibilities, like travel. A worthy exercise. My most oddball idea: Build a Potato Gun. Already did it. Spent less than $25 bucks and it uses compressed air. Its a blast (no pun intended). ;D

I have settled into being a part-time house-husband. I do the shopping and cook dinner, I take my kids to practice and out and about fishing and such, I do some chores and projects around the house and all that helps my DW, who still works part-time from home, focus on her work. It's nice after years as the primary bread-winner, to get to do the domestic stuff. I really like it.

ERD50 08-24-2010 01:23 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by haha (Post 971354)
I used to live in a community that had begun to attract well off early retirees many of whom quickly found themselves at sixes and sevens and started businesses.

Ha

Had to google that one...

Your English Connection: June 2010

Quote:

4) "They found themselves at sixes and sevens." - A distinctly British saying not usually used in North America that equates to "being disorganized". In this case the ball was sent through towards goal but the forward players did not seem to know where the ball was and who should be going to get it. The play failed because of this disorganization.
-ERD50

haha 08-24-2010 01:24 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ERD50 (Post 971374)
Had to google that one...

Your English Connection: June 2010



-ERD50

ERD, I am surprised by this etymylogical note. I picked this saying up from my US born parents.

Ha

Nords 08-24-2010 05:36 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by cardude (Post 971301)
Haven't caught a wave since June in Costa Rica.

I think you're narrowing in on the solution...

Quote:

Originally Posted by flyfishnevada (Post 971369)
+1 on the "Get-A-Life-Tree". Mine is more a of a bullet list, but it has about 60 things on it and many of those open further possibilities, like travel. A worthy exercise.

I've had a blank copy sitting on my desk blotter for years. Maybe someday I'll get around to doing something with it.

73ss454 08-24-2010 05:51 PM

Since you don't need the money and your DW is gamefully employed maybe you can do some volunteer work to keep busy.

Midpack 08-24-2010 06:05 PM

I also highly recommend the Zelinski Get-A-Life-Tree exercise. I posted a long thread about my findings about a year ago. However, I found it more useful for activities outside of work, though I guess it could be useful for identifying types of work too.

I'm a manufacturing Plant Manager now, pretty much burned out. The jobs I really enjoyed before my professional career were waiter and greenskeeper - who knows, maybe I'll take a crack at one of those again since the money's a secondary issue. I won't miss being "the boss" one bit - the whiners get really tiresome eventually.

Free To Canoe 08-24-2010 06:20 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Midpack (Post 971518)
I also highly recommend the Zelinski Get-A-Life-Tree exercise.....

I wonder if the "Tree" is the same as a bucket list? Doing the tree exercise helps you to think outside the box.

Completing my first summer of Summer Park Ranger, a long held ambition / goofey idea. Glad I tried it.

Free to canoe

flyfishnevada 08-24-2010 10:47 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Free To Canoe (Post 971532)
I wonder if the "Tree" is the same as a bucket list? Doing the tree exercise helps you to think outside the box.

Completing my first summer of Summer Park Ranger, a long held ambition / goofey idea. Glad I tried it.

Free to canoe

Not so much a bucket list, but ya it helps you think outside the box. I suppose you could use it to build a bucket list. Mine is more things to do long term rather than the classic bucket list stuff like sky diving and climbing mount Everest.

One of my ambitions is to be a Jungle Cruise skipper at Disneyland. Crazy, yes, but I talked to a skipper and he used to be a lawyer. Now he drives to jungle boats on weekends and loves it. Wish I would have talked to him more.

TargaDave 08-25-2010 05:17 PM

Actually I think the partime Baja Fish Taco Stand sounds cool! Doesn't sound like you're jumping in too deep and if ya keep expectations and startup cost low then why not?

We moved from PA to the Outer Banks and I completely walked away from the previous life of running a small biz in the hi-tech materials world. At first I thought I would do something like home rehab/maintenence type work (did it many moons ago with my older bro) but too many unemployed contractors here to start with and really didn't have enough interest. Also thought about joining the national park service but the actual job descriptions were not as interesting as you might think and tons of competition to get in.

The last thing I considered was making money off my favorite pastime (and a big reason we moved here), kiteboarding. I worried about ruining what I enjoyed by trying to make money at it, or even having the stamina to do it every day. Tip-toed in by working at a kiteboard shop/resort as an employee. Decided I liked teaching far more than doing retail/mail-order stuff, as long as it was parttime. Still piddly money as an employee, so I made a deal with the owner to teach as a contractor and cover all my own costs (gear, insurance, jet-ski, etc) in return for a higher percentage of the lesson fee. That made all the difference.

First time I've ever played the role of teacher which I enjoy. It also forces me to stay in far better shape than I otherwise would be (almost 52). Is it the perfect play job? Nope. Is it generally fun/rewarding? You bet. Plenty of time off to play and the season is Apr-Oct so also have the winters off to do other stuff. Might stay with this "while it lasts" or let it evolve into something else, who knows.

If you asked me 8 years ago whether I would end up doing this as an ER fun job, I would have said, "yeah right, in my fantasy dream". Maybe that's why I don't think your food stand idea is so crazy right now

Anyway, good luck!

NW-Bound 08-25-2010 05:42 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by cardude (Post 971190)
...because it's still in the car business for crying out loud!

I really do not relate to this at all. My life work has allowed me to build up valuable experiences, which have enabled me to make a comfortable living doing just part-time work right now. You know the car business, having done this for 20 years. Why quit now?

I understand why some people get fed up with their workplace and just want to get away from it. I would be too, in fact was unhappy with the work environment to walk away from my secure megacorp job at the age of 40. But once I got free from it, and not having to feel like Dilbert, I learned to love my work again.

In your case, you have always been your own boss. What's the problem?

Within the last 6 months, I have bought 3 used vehicles, an RV and two cars, from 3 different individuals who bought cars to flip. They went to car auctions, car impounds, used car dealerships, or got cars from individuals to resell. I didn't really know how much they got my cars for, but as long as I got them at a fair or good price compared to elsewhere, I was OK. I did have a friendly chat with them all, as I was curious about their work. I didn't think their work was boring. One used to own a car lot; he said he sold it 2 or 3 years ago and got out at the right time. He still had plenty of wealth to prove it; a nice custom house in a prestigious neighborhood where houses were all seven-figures. Not a bad life at all, although I wouldn't know how to do it and would not learn now.


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 01:00 PM.

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.