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AnIntentionalRoad 01-02-2017 03:06 PM

Graduate School After Retirement
 
I've been ERed for 4 years and have several hobbies that keep me pretty busy but I've always wanted to go back to school to get a PhD in a field that I had a strong intellectual interest in. I've recently been accepted into a doctoral program in business, where I'll specialize in entrepreneurship. I start next fall and will likely be 51 when I complete the program. Not sure what I'll do with the degree. I might teach PT in a business school in my 50s or I might just enjoy the journey of the program without ever putting it to use professionally.

I'm curious if anyone else has started in a Masters or Doctoral program after retiring? Why? Did you finish? What did you do after? Anything you would do differently?

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Meadbh 01-02-2017 03:32 PM

Not me. I have three degrees, including a Masters and a doctorate. I got my third degree in my 40s. All three helped me forge a great career. However, there is no way I would go to the expense and work of doing another degree in ER. There would be no financial payback as I have no intention of rejoining the workforce. I have a lifelong love of learning, which I satisfy now by taking free online courses, workshops, and the occasional hands on course in eclectic subjects ranging from economics to history to Italian cooking.

Bigdawg 01-02-2017 03:56 PM

I may go back and finish a MBA just to zero out my gi bill. They pay a little over 2K/month housing stipend so may do it for financial reasons but never actually use it for a job. I have 19 months left so I could definately add some $ to the stash.

braumeister 01-02-2017 04:11 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Meadbh (Post 1819576)
Not me. I have three degrees, including a Masters and a doctorate. I got my third degree in my 40s. All three helped me forge a great career. However, there is no way I would go to the expense and work of doing another degree in ER. There would be no financial payback as I have no intention of rejoining the workforce. I have a lifelong love of learning, which I satisfy now by taking free online courses, workshops, and the occasional hands on course in eclectic subjects ranging from economics to history to Italian cooking.

+1
Describes me exactly.

bclover 01-02-2017 04:27 PM

I've gone back to school for a class or two and would do so to get a degree. I enjoy education simply for the fact of learning.

erkevin 01-02-2017 04:28 PM

No thank you. Three degrees here; Bachelors and two M.Eds. I AM DONE!

Ronstar 01-02-2017 04:32 PM

At one time post-retirement, I thought about going after my MBA. I've since changed my mind since I have no interest in business anymore. But I would like to go back for a BA in American History. That would be fun.

mamadogmamacat 01-02-2017 05:14 PM

Have Bachelors and Masters in engineering. Began a 2 yr certification program, online mainly, while still working, in ministry. Just recently completed it, 10 months into ER. Mainly for the enjoyment, and the interaction with others of similar faith background but widely varying racial/ethnic/social backgrounds in the online courses. Whether I do anything with it beyond that, and whether that is all volunteer, or perhaps teaching for a small stipend, or some of both, is TBD. Have no interest in a PhD, too time consuming.

euro 01-02-2017 05:22 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by braumeister (Post 1819599)
+1
Describes me exactly.

+2

rodi 01-02-2017 05:29 PM

I thought about it. I've taken 4 classes since retiring. I decided that I don't want a formal degree (beyond what I already have) - but would rather take courses in subjects that interest me - but not necessarily organized or related as they'd need to be for a formal degree. So I could take Italian one term, accounting the next, and history the third.... That suits my retirement educational goals.

W2R 01-02-2017 05:30 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Meadbh (Post 1819576)
Not me. I have three degrees, including a Masters and a doctorate. I got my third degree in my 40s. All three helped me forge a great career. However, there is no way I would go to the expense and work of doing another degree in ER. There would be no financial payback as I have no intention of rejoining the workforce. I have a lifelong love of learning, which I satisfy now by taking free online courses, workshops, and the occasional hands on course in eclectic subjects ranging from economics to history to Italian cooking.

+3

I don't need to prove anything to myself, or to anybody else. I don't have any practical use for another degree, because I am FI and have no intention of ever working again.

Before I retired, I thought I'd like to get an MBA and also pass the CPA exam. Why? I have no clue. I guess I was afraid I'd get bored without the formal structure of a degree program. Now that I'm retired, I find that this isn't the case (for me).

broadway 01-02-2017 05:44 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by mamadogmamacat (Post 1819643)
Have Bachelors and Masters in engineering.

Me too.

I have thought about getting an AS in Accounting just so that people take me seriously when I discuss money. I can't very well show them my net worth. ;D

beanctr88 01-02-2017 05:44 PM

I have considered going to law school so I could spend time representing people that I feel are getting a raw deal and need representation. Also to keep state and local politicians and regulators honest by filing suit over laws and regulations that are overreaching.

broadway 01-02-2017 05:53 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by beanctr88 (Post 1819668)
I have considered going to law school so I could spend time representing people that I feel are getting a raw deal and need representation. Also to keep state and local politicians and regulators honest by filing suit over laws and regulations that are overreaching.


An animal rescue had their domain name *.com and *.net taken by a different animal rescue. This also means that the $ are being directed to the wrong organization.

I know this is not right, and I recalled that major corporations have sued to stop this, but that requires $$$ that animal rescue #1 does not have.

If I was a lawyer, I would do something about this.

However, I would not be a good lawyer because it requires a completely different mentality than what I am good at.

Philliefan33 01-02-2017 05:58 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by beanctr88 (Post 1819668)
I have considered going to law school so I could spend time representing people that I feel are getting a raw deal and need representation. Also to keep state and local politicians and regulators honest by filing suit over laws and regulations that are overreaching.



I get the same idea whenever I read about about how poorly some defendants are represented by overworked public defenders. "Just Mercy" by Bryan Stevenson had me looking into local law schools.

But then I remember that if I enrolled I might need to set an alarm to get to class, and be on a schedule, and the feeling passes.

Texas Proud 01-02-2017 06:03 PM

Not me either.... not interested in being called a Dr....

And what other reason is there to get the degree.... if you want to go learn, audit the courses and learn... then you do not have to follow a program...

If you are good, I would bet that they would allow you to help out in any research etc. if you volunteer....


So, would you be doing it to challenge yourself or do you want to 'reward' of a PHD???

Bestwifeever 01-02-2017 06:33 PM

DH did, in his creative field. He had worked in a niche his whole career so jumped at the idea of going back to school full time for a masters the year after REing (he would have gotten his masters before starting his career but his Uncle Sam had another plan). An amazing two years experience that gave him tons of happiness. If it's something that appeals to you, why not?

AnIntentionalRoad 01-02-2017 06:48 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by beanctr88 (Post 1819668)
I have considered going to law school so I could spend time representing people that I feel are getting a raw deal and need representation. Also to keep state and local politicians and regulators honest by filing suit over laws and regulations that are overreaching.

That's awesome! Love it.

jjquantz 01-02-2017 07:04 PM

I've been tempted to enroll in a music program. Not so much for the classwork (history and theory) as for a chance to play and sing in higher quality ensembles than are generally available to an amateur musician. It also might help me build additional connections for performance opportunities outside the college setting. I've been reluctant to take on anything that resembles a regular schedule, however. I enjoy unstructured time too much right now. But that might change.

Montecfo 01-02-2017 07:58 PM

I would do it. Just one degree here. Love the idea if it is something you want.


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