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-   -   New Tax Law and Charitable Giving (http://www.early-retirement.org/forums/f28/new-tax-law-and-charitable-giving-95392.html)

gcgang 12-23-2018 08:00 PM

New Tax Law and Charitable Giving
 
https://www.cnbc.com/2018/12/18/how-...aboolainternal

Article states almost half of charitable givers who currently get a tax deduction will lose their deduction with the new tax law. Fears of charities that giving may decline are mentioned, as is the strategy of "bunching & skipping" annual donations.

For givers over 70 1/2 who take RMDs from their IRAs, the charitable option becomes even more attractive. That may appeal to me down the road as my DAF, funded during my high income years, becomes exhausted.

gerntz 12-23-2018 09:14 PM

Two things: 1) With lower tax rates, the income deductions - they aren't tax deductions - aren't worth as much, and 2) The income deductions lost for those folks are covered by higher standard income deduction; i.e., in many cases the standard income deduction is so large that they get a bigger total deduction if gifting the same amounts than they would have under that old law.

Really, are people gifting because they value the charity or because the want an income deduction?

Greg V 12-23-2018 09:22 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by gerntz (Post 2161885)
Really, are people gifting because they value the charity or because the want an income deduction?

I think it's a bit of both.

Souschef 12-23-2018 09:23 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by gcgang (Post 2161857)
https://www.cnbc.com/2018/12/18/how-...aboolainternal
For givers over 70 1/2 who take RMDs from their IRAs, the charitable option becomes even more attractive. That may appeal to me down the road as my DAF, funded during my high income years, becomes exhausted.

Absolutely!I do a lot of giving from my IRA, as that part of the RMD is not taxed. QCD's to me are an absolute necessity.

VanWinkle 12-24-2018 06:13 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Souschef (Post 2161890)
Absolutely!I do a lot of giving from my IRA, as that part of the RMD is not taxed. QCD's to me are an absolute necessity.


+1 QCDs are the best thing for charities to come along for many years.

Midpack 12-24-2018 06:28 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by gerntz (Post 2161885)
Really, are people gifting because they value the charity or because the want an income deduction?

Quote:

Originally Posted by Greg V (Post 2161889)
I think it's a bit of both.

+2. Some people will contribute less due to the change in standard deductions, whether it’s significant or not is TBD.

Some recent discussion here http://www.early-retirement.org/foru...ons-95218.html.

Fishingmn 12-24-2018 07:56 AM

We did reduce ours as we will no longer be able to itemize.

Lewis Clark 12-24-2018 08:01 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by gerntz (Post 2161885)
... Really, are people gifting because they value the charity or because the want an income deduction?

I think most people gift primarily to support the cause, and take the deduction as an extra benefit for themselves.

Making a donation with a *primary* goal of benefiting from the tax savings makes no sense mathematically.

Hermit 12-24-2018 08:26 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by gcgang (Post 2161857)
https://www.cnbc.com/2018/12/18/how-...aboolainternal

Article states almost half of charitable givers who currently get a tax deduction will lose their deduction with the new tax law. Fears of charities that giving may decline are mentioned, as is the strategy of "bunching & skipping" annual donations.

For givers over 70 1/2 who take RMDs from their IRAs, the charitable option becomes even more attractive. That may appeal to me down the road as my DAF, funded during my high income years, becomes exhausted.

From the article:
Quote:

Using a qualified charitable distribution lets you reduce your taxable income by the amount donated, up to 50 percent of your adjusted gross income, according to the National Association of Enrolled Agents.
I have never heard this about a QCD before. The way I read this statement, if you have a gross income of 50K, the most you can give in the form of a QCD and have it not not be taxed is 25K. I thought the only restriction was up to 100k could be given in a year and would count as not taxable.

Choices 12-24-2018 08:30 AM

We will give the same, maybe a bit more. The charities that we support are important to us. I urge my kids to donate rather than buy me gifts.
Most folks do not realize how tax deductions work, the same folks who never figured out the “ progressive” part.

FireFool 12-24-2018 08:37 AM

My charities will have received less in 2018 because I doubled up in 2017 - effectively pre-giving for 2018. I'm planning on giving earlier in 2019 to help smooth their revenues a bit, not that in the large scheme that my gifts are any recognizable percentage to any charity.

JoeWras 12-24-2018 08:46 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by FireFool (Post 2162001)
My charities will have received less in 2018 because I doubled up in 2017 - effectively pre-giving for 2018. I'm planning on giving earlier in 2019 to help smooth their revenues a bit, not that in the large scheme that my gifts are any recognizable percentage to any charity.

This is where a Donor Advised Fund helps. You can bunch your giving while evening out the grants.

This is our last year working so we gave heavily to our DAF. We have charitable giving covered for the next four years. Good thing too since it looks like we may be running into sequence of return issues in our new retirement.

harllee 12-24-2018 09:07 AM

I am giving less this year because I doubled up on charitable giving last year last year. I think charitable giving will be down this year--some because many people like me doubled up last year and some because people will not be itemizing. I am on the Board of a charity and it looks like for that charity giving of that organization will definitely be down this year. That charity is working hard to tap the QCDs but many of their donors are not yet old enough to do QCDs. DH has a couple more years before he can do the QCD (and I have 3 more years) so we are telling some charities that we are going to limit our giving until we can do the QCDs and then we will up our charitable giving to make it up. Right now charitable giving presents a cash flow problem for us since most of our remaining assets are in traditional IRAs.

Bir48die 12-24-2018 09:31 AM

Sad that helping an organization would come down to whether you could deduct it or not. I'm a steady giver myself and have not adjusted anything

Teacher Terry 12-24-2018 09:44 AM

We give regardless of tax deductions.

JoeWras 12-24-2018 09:53 AM

We'll give too, short of them making any charitable giving an actual penalty by law. In the meantime, since there is still a deduction after the standard number, we'll take advantage of it through bunching.

The fact is this will affect some people. Just as some people insist the mortgage deduction is the only reason they'd buy a house.

One more example, which is most disturbing. Because of minimums and out of pockets for medical care, I've seen people not go to the doctor even when they suspected something serious, simply because "they'd have to pay" for that $150 doctor visit. This happened a lot after many plans were changed from complete pay or small co-pay to a higher deductible model. Meanwhile, they drive to their Lexus dealer and fork over $1000 for simple maintenance. It is the strange way humans act.

gerntz 12-24-2018 09:58 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Bir48die (Post 2162031)
Sad that helping an organization would come down to whether you could deduct it or not. I'm a steady giver myself and have not adjusted anything

Tax laws affect spending, giving, investing, earnings & where people choose to live. Being oblivious gets you killed.

RunningBum 12-24-2018 10:12 AM

Are some people giving less than normal because of the loss of the tax deduction, or were they giving more than normal before because of the tax deduction?

38Chevy454 12-24-2018 10:27 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by gerntz (Post 2162046)
Tax laws affect spending, giving, investing, earnings & where people choose to live. Being oblivious gets you killed.


Just playing Devil's advocate, there are also a lot of other reasons that are not tax related, such as personal, family, familiarity, preference; for people to use in their decisions. I do agree that tax laws can have an effect for those that are aware of the ways taxes affect. I still do charitable, although with new tax laws and also now being retired, there will be no Sch A deductions this year. Just taking the std deduction, for almost the first time since started my working career.

scrabbler1 12-24-2018 10:28 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by RunningBum (Post 2162051)
Are some people giving less than normal because of the loss of the tax deduction, or were they giving more than normal before because of the tax deduction?

For me it's the latter. I was due to make another clothing donation because, as I described in that "purge" thread, my closets were getting too stuffed. I made it late last year while I could still get some value from the donation via itemized deduction, something I don't expect to take again anytime soon.


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