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Old 03-28-2020, 06:24 PM   #21
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I tried to save my begonia tubers, but I think I let them dry out. Trying to rescusitate them.

Started some annuals inside mid February. Almost time to get them out. I also started some lettuce. It is planted and doing well. I didn't plan for a "stay at home" directive when I started these seedlings. Just luck that the lettuce will come in handy at that time.

The one annual I'm trying this year are downy-mildew resistant impatiens. We'll see. I miss my impatiens greatly. Supposedly these are almost immune. They started very easily and are quite robust. Let's see how they go when I get them out in the germs. We've had our own pandemic wiping out the impatiens in much of the more temperate areas of the country.

Here's a little article about downy mildew that alarmingly reads similar to the covid-19 mess. It is a worldwide pandemic too.
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Old 04-04-2020, 06:10 PM   #22
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My gardening "funny" for the day. For years I have dumped kitchen vegetable scraps out of the front door behind some large bushes. We have been doing some garden chores including putting stepping stones next to the house behind the bushes. I was digging up some volunteer lilies that were in the way to pass along to a friend, and I dug up- a potato. Apparently it had grown from tossed potato peels...
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Old 04-04-2020, 06:41 PM   #23
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I was digging up some volunteer lilies that were in the way to pass along to a friend, and I dug up- a potato. Apparently it had grown from tossed potato peels...
I occasionally get potatoes growing out of my compost bin. They are more sturdy that we think.
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Old 04-04-2020, 07:31 PM   #24
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Before the coronavirus mess, I had put together a propagation box, but hadn't done anything with it. Spring is here in Alabama- and I've been working in the garden nearly every day. Right now I have sweet potato vines, rose cuttings, and basil rooting in the box. I haven't had success rooting this particular rose. Maybe this will be the year. Tomorrow I'm going to root some of my favorite hydrangeas- instead of pastel, they bloom in a deep dark purple.
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Old 10-11-2020, 11:36 AM   #25
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Geraniums are out of hibernation, denuded and back in dirt. Was surprised to see that new shoots had begun even while they were hanging upside down in the dark.
This process of overwintering of geraniums worked well for me, so am getting ready to repeat it this winter. The one thing I learned (or at least I think I learned) is that the plants need a gradual hardening off in the spring before being placed outside permanently. All the leaves that grew in April, while the plants were under grow lamps in the warm basement, withered and dropped off after I placed them outside. They eventually came back and flowered beautifully, but were set back by a good 3 weeks.
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Old 10-11-2020, 12:11 PM   #26
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I built a greenhouse several years ago to propagate my own landscaping plants. Turns out growing your own in a green house is a lot like fishing; much cheaper to just go to the store and buy than do it yourself. Ha! But the experience is a hobby I enjoyed. I ended up on a forum with a guy out of Florida (I'm in California) and we developed a dwarf banana tree. The idea was to create a banana tree that could survive indoors and not be too tall. The shortest tree at the time was over 11' tall. Ours tops out at 9' tall. The bananas are only ornamental, but it could be possible to have eatable fruit with enough genetic knowledge thrown in. We don't have that.
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Old 10-11-2020, 02:44 PM   #27
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I stuck a few of those tiny, sweet red potatoes in a flower pot one year, and they went nuts putting out vines. Next thing I knew, we had enough tiny red potatoes for one dinner. They were so good (from being fresh)!

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I occasionally get potatoes growing out of my compost bin. They are more sturdy that we think.
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Old 10-11-2020, 05:59 PM   #28
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I'm thinking of trying to grow gazania from seed next spring as the local nursery stores don't grow many of them and they are fairly expensive for the number of plants I use. Some of the stores have stopped even offering them in cell packs and only sell 'Jumbo' annuals at prices too high for me.
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Old 10-11-2020, 07:24 PM   #29
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I tried to save my begonia tubers, but I think I let them dry out. Trying to rescusitate them.

Started some annuals inside mid February. Almost time to get them out. I also started some lettuce. It is planted and doing well. I didn't plan for a "stay at home" directive when I started these seedlings. Just luck that the lettuce will come in handy at that time.

The one annual I'm trying this year are downy-mildew resistant impatiens. We'll see. I miss my impatiens greatly. Supposedly these are almost immune. They started very easily and are quite robust. Let's see how they go when I get them out in the germs. We've had our own pandemic wiping out the impatiens in much of the more temperate areas of the country.

Here's a little article about downy mildew that alarmingly reads similar to the covid-19 mess. It is a worldwide pandemic too.
So how did the begonias and impatiens work out? I bought some tuberous begonias in the spring and they were absolutely gorgeous. Hope I can get them back again next year.
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Old 10-12-2020, 05:12 AM   #30
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So how did the begonias and impatiens work out? I bought some tuberous begonias in the spring and they were absolutely gorgeous. Hope I can get them back again next year.
Never planted any begonias, since I killed my tubers.

The impatiens turned out GREAT! They are back, baby! These really did resist the mildew problem.

When the sun comes up I'll try to take a picture. The mound is nearly 2' high right now.
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Old 10-12-2020, 06:24 AM   #31
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OK. A little before and after from the exact same spot and angle.

I planted my grown-from-seed seedlings on March 29. I took a chance regarding frost, had to cover them two nights. I started the seedlings in mid Feb. Impatiens are very easy to grow from seed.

The after picture was taken 10 minutes ago. I also planted a few tomatoes on the side. The celosia growing among the impatiens are volunteers from my compost, courtesy last year's crop and a cold winter compost. It was live and let live with volunteers this year. The celosia bloom really late, starting on September and now are going crazy, adding a nice late season complement to the impatiens.

I fertilized twice in the season with liquid miracle grow. My real secret is mixing in a good amount of home brewed compost each February.
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Old 10-12-2020, 06:34 AM   #32
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BTW, in my older age, I've jettisoned pure order. 20 years ago I would have picked every celosia "weed" and just had a nice mono-mound of impatiens. I also would not have thought of planting an ugly tomato on the side.

With the pandemic, the tomato had to go somewhere. So, it went there. And volunteers? You are welcome to my garden any time. Welcome back, friend. I have 5th year vinca (annual type) that I've nurtured through the years as volunteers only. I pluck them and transplant to appropriate places.
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Old 10-12-2020, 07:12 AM   #33
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I built a greenhouse several years ago to propagate my own landscaping plants. Turns out growing your own in a green house is a lot like fishing; much cheaper to just go to the store and buy than do it yourself. Ha! But the experience is a hobby I enjoyed. I ended up on a forum with a guy out of Florida (I'm in California) and we developed a dwarf banana tree. The idea was to create a banana tree that could survive indoors and not be too tall. The shortest tree at the time was over 11' tall. Ours tops out at 9' tall. The bananas are only ornamental, but it could be possible to have eatable fruit with enough genetic knowledge thrown in. We don't have that.
I intermittently toy with the idea of adding a greenhouse, mainly to get an early start on things like dahlias, tomatoes and other late/slow bloomers that have short windows here in the Northeast (zone 5). Clustering bulky, dirty pots around the windows of our house is not a big hit with the spouse, but I think you are right...fun, but not a practical investment. Will probably add grow lights in the basement.

Engineering a new banana tree...now that is ambitious. Way out of my league.
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Old 10-12-2020, 11:21 AM   #34
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Clustering bulky, dirty pots around the windows of our house is not a big hit with the spouse, but I think you are right...fun, but not a practical investment. Will probably add grow lights in the basement.
I have a few lights on the workbench from Feb to April in my garage basement. During those times, neighbors always ask what I'm growing, with a wink.

We're zone 7b, so this works well.

As for the cost and investment aspect. Well, I think I'm doing pretty well. Start a hundred or so seedlings each year. I'd guess after about 4 years, I'm even. Maybe next year I can get ahead.

BTW, the new LED grow lights are super lightweight and easy to work with.
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Old 10-27-2020, 01:36 PM   #35
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I know this is pretty minimal compared to y'all but I'm in zone 8b, and I hardly have to dig up anything. I'm going to try digging up and replanting my ornamental sweet potatoes this year.
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Old 10-28-2020, 05:22 AM   #36
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I know this is pretty minimal compared to y'all but I'm in zone 8b, and I hardly have to dig up anything. I'm going to try digging up and replanting my ornamental sweet potatoes this year.


I just take a few cuttings and leave em in a glass jar for a few months. They are prolific rooters.
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