Portal Forums Links Register FAQ Community Calendar Today's Posts Search Log in

Join Early Retirement Today
Reply
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Mission to Mars
Old 02-18-2021, 07:46 AM   #1
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
street's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2016
Posts: 4,006
Mission to Mars

Looking forward to seeing and reading about the landing today for the Rover to land on Mars. I beleive it has been in space for about 7 months now and will finally reach it's destination.
https://mars.nasa.gov/mars2020/timeline/landing/
street is offline   Reply With Quote
Join the #1 Early Retirement and Financial Independence Forum Today - It's Totally Free!

Are you planning to be financially independent as early as possible so you can live life on your own terms? Discuss successful investing strategies, asset allocation models, tax strategies and other related topics in our online forum community. Our members range from young folks just starting their journey to financial independence, military retirees and even multimillionaires. No matter where you fit in you'll find that Early-Retirement.org is a great community to join. Best of all it's totally FREE!

You are currently viewing our boards as a guest so you have limited access to our community. Please take the time to register and you will gain a lot of great new features including; the ability to participate in discussions, network with our members, see fewer ads, upload photographs, create a retirement blog, send private messages and so much, much more!

Old 02-18-2021, 08:24 AM   #2
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Posts: 6,231
Me too. I love seeing (and even hearing) the sights and landscape.

Sadly, it's becoming a regular event with regular photos of the planet (or is it just me because I'm so interested in it and view everything?)

Hoping to live long enough to see a human landing/colony!
__________________
Living well is the best revenge!
Retired @ 52 in 2005
marko is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-18-2021, 09:48 AM   #3
Recycles dryer sheets
 
Join Date: Jan 2018
Location: Boise
Posts: 89
Me as well. Very interesting to see the technologies developed to deploy the rover, drone, etc. Gives me hope that our tech, engineering and science communities are alive and well.
__________________
Regards,

Tom
tominboise is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-18-2021, 11:47 AM   #4
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
 
Join Date: Jan 2017
Posts: 1,590
I have a meeting scheduled to start 30 minutes after touchdown. I'm so bummed!

Then again, there probably won't be any real action until I get home, so I suppose it's OK.

My only fear at this point is the news has been hyping this up so much, they've jinxed it.

Fingers crossed that all goes well!
CaptTom is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-18-2021, 12:55 PM   #5
Full time employment: Posting here.
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Posts: 536
I spent a lot of the morning reading about the instrumentation on this thing, it's pretty fascinating stuff:
https://mars.nasa.gov/mars2020/spacecraft/instruments/
https://mars.nasa.gov/mars2020/spacecraft/rover/

It's also pretty wild how the rover will be storing rock and soil samples in sealed tubes, so that a future mission might be able to return those samples to earth.
DayDreaming is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-18-2021, 03:04 PM   #6
Administrator
Gumby's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Posts: 16,059
Successful landing. Sending out pictures from the surface of Mars.
__________________
Living an analog life in the Digital Age.
Gumby is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 02-18-2021, 03:16 PM   #7
Moderator
braumeister's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Flyover country
Posts: 17,466
Love seeing those ear-to-ear grins on everyone at JPL.

Hoping the Chinese have good luck with their lander.
__________________
I thought growing old would take longer.
braumeister is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-18-2021, 03:21 PM   #8
Recycles dryer sheets
Go-NoGo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2016
Posts: 315
Love it.. what a landing!
Now waiting for all the science results to come back and the helicopter flight
Go-NoGo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-18-2021, 03:33 PM   #9
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
Koogie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: GTA
Posts: 1,592
Good work NASA !!

That'll teach those dusters...


(Expanse reference)
__________________
Family Motto: "Every penny's a prisoner"
Koogie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-18-2021, 03:38 PM   #10
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
timo2's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: Bernalillo, NM
Posts: 2,660
I'm glad the USA mission is working. UAE and China are close behind this year.
__________________

"We live the lives we lead because of the thoughts we think" ...Michael O’Neill
"We can cannot compel others to do our will" ....Norman Goldman
"There never is shortage of the gullible to accept the illogical"...Anonymous
timo2 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-18-2021, 04:01 PM   #11
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
JoeWras's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Posts: 6,952
First low res image, through the dust cover:


They are getting faster with the images. Missions from long ago used to take way too long.
__________________
Retired Class of 2018


JoeWras is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 02-18-2021, 07:41 PM   #12
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
 
Join Date: Jan 2017
Posts: 1,590
Quote:
Originally Posted by braumeister View Post
Love seeing those ear-to-ear grins on everyone at JPL.

Hoping the Chinese have good luck with their lander.
I didn't see any grins - they were all wearing masks!

Did you notice that the UAE sent a lander. The Chinese one-upped that with a rover. The USA sent a rover... AND a helicopter! AND we lowered the whole thing down with a rocket-powered sky crane!

(I wish all the missions well, and congratulate the other two. But I'm also allowing myself a little bit of national pride.)
CaptTom is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-18-2021, 08:05 PM   #13
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Fair Lawn
Posts: 2,108
I've been absolutely addicted to astronomy since I was a little kid (parents bought me a telescope for my 9th birthday). All of these missions and discoveries never fail to put me in awe.
What also amazes me, though, is how beyond-brilliant all of these scientists are. You can't just point the rocket in the general direction of Mars and hope it gets there, somehow. Truly awesome stuff.
mystang52 is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 02-19-2021, 02:14 AM   #14
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
skipro33's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: Placerville
Posts: 1,509
Watched the whole thing from T-minus 1 hour before touch-down. What I found amazing was that there literally was nothing for anyone to do at JPL but watch. Everything had been programmed to happen at the right time and so that's the way it went down. All they could do was monitor the data.
BTW, takes 11 minutes to send a command and another 11 minutes to get a reply. 22 minutes round trip.
I also thought it was interesting how FAST things progressed after the capsule was freed from the rocket that brought it to Mars. A matter of minutes and it was on the ground!!
skipro33 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-19-2021, 06:30 AM   #15
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Posts: 1,349
Quote:
Originally Posted by CaptTom View Post
... AND we lowered the whole thing down with a rocket-powered sky crane! ...
I'm not fond of the sky crane approach - it looks like an overly-complicated, highly-risky disaster-waiting-to-happen. I'm glad everything went well this time.

Why not fly the payload directly to the planet's surface and separate from the rockets post-landing? I've never done any research or engineering in this area so my opinion isn't worth much, which is why I'm posting it on the Internet.
socca is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-19-2021, 06:31 AM   #16
Recycles dryer sheets
 
Join Date: Nov 2017
Location: solomons
Posts: 410
we watched too, Skip, yes they watched but they all had a job to do, not much different then flight test of jets, we all watching our screens.... Just we wouldn't have 11 minutes to tell the test director if something's jacked ;-) one thing i was wondering about, i did lots of mission planning, route planning, bomb drop locations using earths Lat/Longs etc. have they developed a Lat/Long system for Mars? They got her down pretty close to where they wanted.... also what happened to the PERV delivery vehicle, moved it a mile east and crashed her?
f35phixer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-19-2021, 07:33 AM   #17
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
 
Join Date: Jan 2017
Posts: 1,590
Quote:
Originally Posted by socca View Post
I'm not fond of the sky crane approach - it looks like an overly-complicated, highly-risky disaster-waiting-to-happen.
Yup. A uniquely American solution. Reminds me of the (probably apocryphal) story of how NASA spent a fortune developing a pen which would write in zero-gravity, in freezing temperatures, in a vacuum, etc. Presented with the same problem, the Russians just used a pencil.

Quote:
Originally Posted by f35phixer View Post
one thing i was wondering about, i did lots of mission planning, route planning, bomb drop locations using earths Lat/Longs etc. have they developed a Lat/Long system for Mars? They got her down pretty close to where they wanted.... also what happened to the PERV delivery vehicle, moved it a mile east and crashed her?
I had the same thought. They used terrain for the final adjustments, and apparently the lander radioed its touchdown location to the MRO. They made a big deal about knowing exactly where it was. My first thought was whether they used terrain or a coordinate system for that positioning. And if the latter, what do they use for the prime meridian? That's the curse of having navigation experience. You can never get it out of your mind.

And yes, the PERV was just crashed a safe distance away. There was some talk about picking up the seismic activity from the landing on the sensors on another lander already there. Probably not the crash, but maybe the rocket vibrations.
CaptTom is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-19-2021, 07:37 AM   #18
Recycles dryer sheets
 
Join Date: Nov 2017
Location: solomons
Posts: 410
Quote:
Originally Posted by CaptTom View Post
Yup. A uniquely American solution. Reminds me of the (probably apocryphal) story of how NASA spent a fortune developing a pen which would write in zero-gravity, in freezing temperatures, in a vacuum, etc. Presented with the same problem, the Russians just used a pencil.



I had the same thought. They used terrain for the final adjustments, and apparently the lander radioed its touchdown location to the MRO. They made a big deal about knowing exactly where it was. My first thought was whether they used terrain or a coordinate system for that positioning. And if the latter, what do they use for the prime meridian? That's the curse of having navigation experience. You can never get it out of your mind.

And yes, the PERV was just crashed a safe distance away. There was some talk about picking up the seismic activity from the landing on the sensors on another lander already there. Probably not the crash, but maybe the rocket vibrations.
maybe all they have is a compass, then they have MAGVAR to worry about too
f35phixer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-19-2021, 07:40 AM   #19
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
street's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2016
Posts: 4,006
Quote:
Originally Posted by skipro33 View Post
Watched the whole thing from T-minus 1 hour before touch-down. What I found amazing was that there literally was nothing for anyone to do at JPL but watch. Everything had been programmed to happen at the right time and so that's the way it went down. All they could do was monitor the data.
BTW, takes 11 minutes to send a command and another 11 minutes to get a reply. 22 minutes round trip.
I also thought it was interesting how FAST things progressed after the capsule was freed from the rocket that brought it to Mars. A matter of minutes and it was on the ground!!
Yes, I agree and it always amazes me how technology is so advanced.
street is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-19-2021, 07:42 AM   #20
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
JoeWras's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Posts: 6,952
Quote:
Originally Posted by socca View Post
I'm not fond of the sky crane approach - it looks like an overly-complicated, highly-risky disaster-waiting-to-happen. I'm glad everything went well this time.

Why not fly the payload directly to the planet's surface and separate from the rockets post-landing? I've never done any research or engineering in this area so my opinion isn't worth much, which is why I'm posting it on the Internet.
Viking did a direct land. Another direct land approach (Polar Lander) failed.

The problem with direct land is primarily the shielding needed to deal with the rocks and dust coming back at the instruments. The sky crane allows the designers to skip all that, the instruments can nearly be wide open bare, with only light shielding needed, if any.

The bouncing airbags were cool, but not appropriate for something this size. This thing is HUGE!

So they came up with this idea.

Here's a good article on it: https://www.discovermagazine.com/the...l-land-on-mars
__________________
Retired Class of 2018


JoeWras is online now   Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 2 (1 members and 1 guests)
Koolau

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
57 and on a mission ATLfornow Hi, I am... 9 12-10-2014 04:29 PM
Hi, I am 29 and on a mission to succeed after this recession. GreatlksSailor Hi, I am... 8 09-10-2014 09:46 PM
Voyager Mission mickeyd Other topics 7 10-24-2013 10:10 PM
Who Doesn't Love a Good Classified Mission? mickeyd Other topics 9 06-20-2012 10:22 AM
The IRS Mission TromboneAl FIRE and Money 16 01-11-2009 11:54 PM

» Quick Links

 
All times are GMT -6. The time now is 06:48 PM.
 
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2021, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.