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Old 05-30-2021, 08:30 PM   #121
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Ah yes, herb gardens are a great one! Weíre lucky to live where we can keep most things growing year round, with the exception of cilantro which bolts in the summer. Iíve been looking at growing basil and cilantro inside.EWGirl, how do you do your basil hydroponically? Is there a benefit to this vs just in dirt?

We also grow a lot of our own citrus, but so far the trees havenít produced well enough to get by on what we have outside.

As to the rest of my gardening, I love to do it, but when I add up the $, it has to go in the hobby budget for it to make financial sense. We donít have a great garden setup in the house yet, so itís been an exercise in frustration for the most part.

Re the phantom power, we use about a kW/hr overnight when most things are turned off. It could be significant savings. Unfortunately I think itís the refrigerators that are the big draw, but I am curious what killing all the phantom power would do for us. I suspect much of it is refrigerators, though our AV closet gets very warm. I think I would be worried about putting these on something where I cut the power though. One blown component could blow any savings!


I got a hydroponic garden called Idoo for Christmas. Cheap Aerogarden. I just put the seeds in a well in the pods. It has LED light that are on 16 hrs/day.

Japanese beetles love basil. In the dirt I compete with bugs. Inside, in my kitchen, I just cut off what I need. No birds, no bugs, no bunnies. And donít really need to wash the leaves before using. I have to start new plants periodically.

Itís a work in progress. Cilantro doesnít germinate well, and Iíve had no luck with tarragon. I also found that nutrients designed for the Aerogarden work better than what came with the product.
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Old 05-30-2021, 08:40 PM   #122
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Money saving tips: try these....

(1) If you spend a lot on travel, why not travel locally where you won't need to get a hotel? I doubt any of us have seen and done *everything* interesting within a 3-4 hour drive of home. Exploring nearby gives you a more in-depth knowledge of your own local area. Read about local history and go look at the relevant locations personally! Fascinating. What do tourists seek out when they come to your area? Go see your own home town like a tourist sees it, just for fun. See what local artists and musicians are up to, and check out the wildlife nearby.

(2) Mentally bookmark any activity that you are enjoying which doesn't have recurring charges. Find free hobbies that you genuinely love. If you are paying for internet anyway, might as well use it to its fullest - - just about everything known to man is on the internet, waiting for you to find it in your explorations. How could anyone get bored these days?

(3) When you buy your next home (if you choose to buy one), consider whether or not it's possible to buy it for YOURSELF, not for potential guests or visitors or for your pets. When my relatives come to town, they stay in a motel or hotel of their own choosing and I take them out for restaurant meals, my treat. This is not a selfish way to treat guests. They really seem to prefer doing things this way since it seems more like a vacation to them. They have more choices of what to eat than just whatever I cook. Also they can keep the hours they prefer. I like it too because I don't need a guest bedroom or large dining room. I was able to buy a smaller house without those rooms, that is more suitable for my needs.
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I especially like #3. When I travel, I much prefer a hotel to staying with someone. Just my thing, I suppose. I don't really mind putting someone up in our 2/2 but it can't be as nice for the guest since privacy is compromised for all.

If the local person does the "leg" work and finds a decent, reasonably priced hotel - everybody wins though YMMV.
I like #3 also. My dad is old school and gets insulted if I don’t stay at his house. Worse is that there’s this really cool boutique hotel just a couple miles from his house that I REALLY enjoy staying at. I can get away with it when DW comes with me because his guest room only has a full size bed, but when I go by myself, which is most of the time, I’m kind of stuck.

Hence, me and DW set up our 3 bedroom house as a master bed room and two offices . We got a couple air mattresses for the grand kids, but I wasn’t going to buy a bigger house just to have some guest space on hand when there’s plenty of nice hotels within about 3 miles from here.
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Old 05-31-2021, 07:35 AM   #123
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Where we've lived, that would not work unless the spouses have different surnames, so we could pretend a new family had moved in. The ISPs work by address/family, not individual names.

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Ah, thatís a good tip to use your spouseís name! We have a good deal on our internet, but I know it will go up in august, so Iíve been looking at alternatives. So far I havenít found any cheaper options. Will have to see if we can just shut off and re-establish service in his name.
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Old 05-31-2021, 07:58 AM   #124
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I like #3 also. My dad is old school and gets insulted if I don’t stay at his house. Worse is that there’s this really cool boutique hotel just a couple miles from his house that I REALLY enjoy staying at. I can get away with it when DW comes with me because his guest room only has a full size bed, but when I go by myself, which is most of the time, I’m kind of stuck.

Hence, me and DW set up our 3 bedroom house as a master bed room and two offices . We got a couple air mattresses for the grand kids, but I wasn’t going to buy a bigger house just to have some guest space on hand when there’s plenty of nice hotels within about 3 miles from here.
We actually did this in our forever home! Rooms only for us. 3BR same level. For guests, I built a tiny house parked next to the main house for which I have to pay no tax!

PS: We are in the country so no hotels close to us.
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Old 05-31-2021, 08:10 AM   #125
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We actually did this in our forever home! Rooms only for us. 3BR same level. For guests, I built a tiny house parked next to the main house for which I have to pay no tax!

PS: We are in the country so no hotels close to us.
Yeah, I wish we could have done something like that. We live in the suburbs but we live on an acre. The rules around here wonít allow for anything like that. Iíd love to put up a she shed/mother-in-law suite/tiny house . . .on our property for some extra space with some level of privacy from the main house. At the very least, sounds like a great place for an afternoon nap
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Old 05-31-2021, 10:52 AM   #126
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Where we've lived, that would not work unless the spouses have different surnames, so we could pretend a new family had moved in. The ISPs work by address/family, not individual names.

It must depend on the ISP because it goes by the individual account in our area.
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Old 05-31-2021, 06:33 PM   #127
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I wish I could convince DH to do this with the flea meds! We use the generic, but buy the smaller dog size. Heís too worried he wonít split the dose correctly. The cost differential is annoying!
We do this for our dogs. I have a 48 lb Airedale and two miniature schnauzers, one 18 lbs and the other 20. I buy the extra-large sized Heartguard. That's super easy because I just cut it in half, give one to my airedale, then cut the other 1/2 in half again....and give one to each schnauzer.

For the Advantix II that I use for them, I buy the extra large dose again, and use a dropper to pull it all out, and then apply the appropriate amount to each dog....one of those vials works out for all three. This took more practice to get the drops correct for their size, but doing this is a huge savings...roughly $300 a year.
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Old 06-01-2021, 06:12 AM   #128
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If building a new home, consider geothermal heating and cooling. The advantages are long lasting with utility bills reduced by 30-50% for A/C
and heat. The initial cost, tax breaks, and savings add up to a payback in
4-5 years. After that, the savings are considerable for many years. I am into
year 10 on my system with no problems and yearly all electric home monthly
average bills under 90.00 per month. I live in Illinois, so there is considerable weather for heating and cooling.
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Old 06-01-2021, 07:06 AM   #129
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If building a new home, consider geothermal heating and cooling. The advantages are long lasting with utility bills reduced by 30-50% for A/C
and heat. The initial cost, tax breaks, and savings add up to a payback in
4-5 years. After that, the savings are considerable for many years. I am into
year 10 on my system with no problems and yearly all electric home monthly
average bills under 90.00 per month. I live in Illinois, so there is considerable weather for heating and cooling.
Savings will be dependent on location and energy costs. Gas in inexpensive here (Canadian prairies) and the total cost to heat my house is less than $500. That's for an entire year. Geothermal payback would never happen in my lifetime.

My monthly energy bill (electricity and gas combined) averages just over $100 a month. We have electric stove and HW tank, and central AC.
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Old 06-01-2021, 07:21 AM   #130
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Savings will be dependent on location and energy costs. Gas in inexpensive here (Canadian prairies) and the total cost to heat my house is less than $500. That's for an entire year. Geothermal payback would never happen in my lifetime.

My monthly energy bill (electricity and gas combined) averages just over $100 a month. We have electric stove and HW tank, and central AC.

That's what I was thinking as well. Although my heating cost are higher than yours( about $1800/year for heat and hot water) my electric bills are only averaging $64 /month. So about $2500/yr for heat, hot water and electricity. For NH that's very good.
I can't really complain too much. Geothermal( actually a ground source heat loop) systems are very expensive to install around here.
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Old 06-05-2021, 05:59 PM   #131
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We bought a new 2400 sq.ft. Condo and revised the plan for the 3rd bedroom to be a 3rd guest bathroom and a combo pantry, workshop, linen closet and laundry. We provide recommendations for nearby Airbnb places which suits everyone.

The second BR is a den.
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Old 06-06-2021, 02:17 PM   #132
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Sometimes rosemary does not survive the winter. But buying a new plant in the spring takes care of that. My sage bushes are 15 years old and Iíll prune them when the flowers are done. They are 3 foot+ shrubs now.

Donít plant mint. Extremely invasive.
I have rosemary in a large pot and bring it inside (by a kitchen window) for the winter. It thrives indoors as well.

And I so agree about the mint. I made the mistake of planting it in my yard years ago, and it took several years to get rid of it. Growing it in a pot would be OK, though.
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Old 06-06-2021, 03:33 PM   #133
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I have rosemary in a large pot and bring it inside (by a kitchen window) for the winter. It thrives indoors as well.

And I so agree about the mint. I made the mistake of planting it in my yard years ago, and it took several years to get rid of it. Growing it in a pot would be OK, though.
I used to mow lawns for a living (if you call that living) back in the HS days. One lady had mint everywhere. It smelled so good every time I mowed. YMMV
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Old 06-06-2021, 04:50 PM   #134
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I have rosemary in a large pot and bring it inside (by a kitchen window) for the winter. It thrives indoors as well.
.....
After losing a couple outside rosemary bushes to cold winters here in Connecticut, I made a small (~2'x2'x3') greenhouse that just fits over our bushes. Nothing fancy, just a wood frame with an open bottom, one solid side (the North side) and the top and other sides covered with a double layer of clear plastic sheeting. The inside of the solid North side is painted black. I set a few small sealed plastic water bottles among the rosemary bushes to act as a heat sink, set the greenhouse down over the bushes and put a couple bricks on top to hold it down.

I install my little greenhouse in November and remove it in late March. During the winter, if we need fresh rosemary, I go out, lift the greenhouse and snip off what we need. The bushes have flourished through every winter since I made it.
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Old 06-06-2021, 05:00 PM   #135
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I install my little greenhouse in November and remove it in late March. During the winter, if we need fresh rosemary, I go out, lift the greenhouse and snip off what we need. The bushes have flourished through every winter since I made it.
I love this idea!
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Old 06-07-2021, 10:19 PM   #136
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The free app Locast streams all the local TV channels for major cities for a requested donation of $5.50 (or more) a month compared to ~$30 to add local TV through our local ISPs. I found it on this link: Eight apps that let you stream local news for free - https://www.makeuseof.com/apps-strea...news-for-free/
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Old 06-08-2021, 10:38 AM   #137
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-Phone: Use Tello service at $11 per month. Also have average moto g phone versus an iphone.
-Low Housing Costs: Monthly Rent of $1,200 for 2 bedroom in Chicago representing about ~5% of our gross income. Most friends have bought homes already (mid 30s). This is with 2 adults and 2 toddlers.
-No cable tv. Only have Netflix & Hulu.
-1 car for 2 adults. We simply don't drive that much.
-With 2 young toddlers, avoid buying new clothes and high end products (i.e. uppa baby). We buy all clothes at resale events (at $2-$5 per item)
-Buy most furniture second hand on facebook/craigslist with exception of bedding. Literally have saved 10s of thousands of dollars compared to peers.
-Not completely vegetarian, but try to make veggies the focus of most meals. We try to shop on outer aisles of grocery stores at ethnic stores. We soak and prepare beans versus buying them canned. Try to avoid packaged items. Also try to limit dairy and meat purchasing/consumption. Avoiding packaged items is difficult with a toddler. Shop at Aldi if can't get items at ethnic stores.
-For restaurant eating, we normally do take out at mexican, thai, or chinese restaurants for about $9-$12 per person. We don't eat at restaurants very often. Never order wine when we do. Also don't really pickup pizza, we try to select the least unhealthy frozen veggie pizza at the store.
-Do most reading online or from library. Don't buy book or magazines.
-Use work laptop as personal computer to avoid purchasing second computer.
-Don't do many vacations now with young toddlers. However, when we did, we usually try to game credit card points for hotels and airfare. We were also big on driving trips previously. I wouldn't necessarily recommend this, but we have driven 20-25 hours straight through to avoid staying a hotel. Strategy here is that one person sleeps while other is driving. Now that we are older with toddlers, this likely won't work.
-Work clothing. In my early career, I actually used to buy brooks brother clothing. As I wised up, I began buying business casual shirts and pants at costco or on amazon or 25%-50% of brooks brothers pricing. The key here is buying clothes that fit (i.e. slim fit)
-Personal clothing. I really don't buy much. I see what Marshalls has first if I need something which is rare.
-Fitness: Have a $10/month membership compared to the $100/month high end gym nearby. Also do a lot of body weight exercises, such as burpees, pushups, etc.
-Haircuts: Spouse and I cut each others hairs. This isn't really about the money but more for saving time.
- many many more.
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Old 06-09-2021, 09:20 AM   #138
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Originally Posted by pacman1234 View Post
-Phone: Use Tello service at $11 per month. Also have average moto g phone versus an iphone.
-Low Housing Costs: Monthly Rent of $1,200 for 2 bedroom in Chicago representing about ~5% of our gross income. Most friends have bought homes already (mid 30s). This is with 2 adults and 2 toddlers.
-No cable tv. Only have Netflix & Hulu.
-1 car for 2 adults. We simply don't drive that much.
-With 2 young toddlers, avoid buying new clothes and high end products (i.e. uppa baby). We buy all clothes at resale events (at $2-$5 per item)
-Buy most furniture second hand on facebook/craigslist with exception of bedding. Literally have saved 10s of thousands of dollars compared to peers.
-Not completely vegetarian, but try to make veggies the focus of most meals. We try to shop on outer aisles of grocery stores at ethnic stores. We soak and prepare beans versus buying them canned. Try to avoid packaged items. Also try to limit dairy and meat purchasing/consumption. Avoiding packaged items is difficult with a toddler. Shop at Aldi if can't get items at ethnic stores.
-For restaurant eating, we normally do take out at mexican, thai, or chinese restaurants for about $9-$12 per person. We don't eat at restaurants very often. Never order wine when we do. Also don't really pickup pizza, we try to select the least unhealthy frozen veggie pizza at the store.
-Do most reading online or from library. Don't buy book or magazines.
-Use work laptop as personal computer to avoid purchasing second computer.
-Don't do many vacations now with young toddlers. However, when we did, we usually try to game credit card points for hotels and airfare. We were also big on driving trips previously. I wouldn't necessarily recommend this, but we have driven 20-25 hours straight through to avoid staying a hotel. Strategy here is that one person sleeps while other is driving. Now that we are older with toddlers, this likely won't work.
-Work clothing. In my early career, I actually used to buy brooks brother clothing. As I wised up, I began buying business casual shirts and pants at costco or on amazon or 25%-50% of brooks brothers pricing. The key here is buying clothes that fit (i.e. slim fit)
-Personal clothing. I really don't buy much. I see what Marshalls has first if I need something which is rare.
-Fitness: Have a $10/month membership compared to the $100/month high end gym nearby. Also do a lot of body weight exercises, such as burpees, pushups, etc.
-Haircuts: Spouse and I cut each others hairs. This isn't really about the money but more for saving time.
- many many more.
Interesting and informative first post. Suggest an intro in the "HI, I AM..." Sub Forum. Welcome!
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Old 06-09-2021, 11:16 AM   #139
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-Phone: Use Tello service at $11 per month. Also have average moto g phone versus an iphone.
-Low Housing Costs: Monthly Rent of $1,200 for 2 bedroom in Chicago representing about ~5% of our gross income. Most friends have bought homes already (mid 30s). This is with 2 adults and 2 toddlers.
-No cable tv. Only have Netflix & Hulu.
-1 car for 2 adults. We simply don't drive that much.
-With 2 young toddlers, avoid buying new clothes and high end products (i.e. uppa baby). We buy all clothes at resale events (at $2-$5 per item)
-Buy most furniture second hand on facebook/craigslist with exception of bedding. Literally have saved 10s of thousands of dollars compared to peers.
-Not completely vegetarian, but try to make veggies the focus of most meals. We try to shop on outer aisles of grocery stores at ethnic stores. We soak and prepare beans versus buying them canned. Try to avoid packaged items. Also try to limit dairy and meat purchasing/consumption. Avoiding packaged items is difficult with a toddler. Shop at Aldi if can't get items at ethnic stores.
-For restaurant eating, we normally do take out at mexican, thai, or chinese restaurants for about $9-$12 per person. We don't eat at restaurants very often. Never order wine when we do. Also don't really pickup pizza, we try to select the least unhealthy frozen veggie pizza at the store.
-Do most reading online or from library. Don't buy book or magazines.
-Use work laptop as personal computer to avoid purchasing second computer.
-Don't do many vacations now with young toddlers. However, when we did, we usually try to game credit card points for hotels and airfare. We were also big on driving trips previously. I wouldn't necessarily recommend this, but we have driven 20-25 hours straight through to avoid staying a hotel. Strategy here is that one person sleeps while other is driving. Now that we are older with toddlers, this likely won't work.
-Work clothing. In my early career, I actually used to buy brooks brother clothing. As I wised up, I began buying business casual shirts and pants at costco or on amazon or 25%-50% of brooks brothers pricing. The key here is buying clothes that fit (i.e. slim fit)
-Personal clothing. I really don't buy much. I see what Marshalls has first if I need something which is rare.
-Fitness: Have a $10/month membership compared to the $100/month high end gym nearby. Also do a lot of body weight exercises, such as burpees, pushups, etc.
-Haircuts: Spouse and I cut each others hairs. This isn't really about the money but more for saving time.
- many many more.

I love so many of these!

We definitely fell into the buying expensive brands trap with the kids. Now all of their clothes are bought used. We do try to buy decent quality so we can resell them later. Iíve also been doing the kids haircuts.

Iíve found a couple of clothing brands that donít wrinkle and seem to last forever, so Iíve taken to just getting the new colors every other year or so. We canít seem to find anything but relaxes fit at Costco!
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planting self-sowing and easily propagated plants
Old 06-09-2021, 12:12 PM   #140
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planting self-sowing and easily propagated plants

I've spent a lot of money on plants over the years that's for sure, but the past couple of years instead of buying more plants I'm propagating plants from what I've got and also this year trying to establish a couple of self-sowing poppy and calendula areas. Mowing less (no small kids needing play area) and enjoying making more plants from the plants I already have. I don't even look at the nursery section of stores anymore. The yard looks better with larger sections of the same plants, and with all needing the same care makes for easier maintenance.
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