Join Early Retirement Today
Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 10-03-2020, 03:02 PM   #21
Full time employment: Posting here.
cbo111's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2014
Posts: 736
Vanguard now offers you the ability to purchase some funds as ETFs. These ETFs have lower expense ratios. VG Total Stock Market (VTSAX) becomes VTI. And as a bonus. intraday trading is possible with these ETF funds, which can be very handy when timing is critical.
cbo111 is offline   Reply With Quote
Join the #1 Early Retirement and Financial Independence Forum Today - It's Totally Free!

Are you planning to be financially independent as early as possible so you can live life on your own terms? Discuss successful investing strategies, asset allocation models, tax strategies and other related topics in our online forum community. Our members range from young folks just starting their journey to financial independence, military retirees and even multimillionaires. No matter where you fit in you'll find that Early-Retirement.org is a great community to join. Best of all it's totally FREE!

You are currently viewing our boards as a guest so you have limited access to our community. Please take the time to register and you will gain a lot of great new features including; the ability to participate in discussions, network with our members, see fewer ads, upload photographs, create a retirement blog, send private messages and so much, much more!

Old 10-03-2020, 03:17 PM   #22
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Posts: 5,890
My two stock funds are both (Fidelity) index funds, one for large cap and the other S&P500. The bond funds are not index funds. One is strictly income oriented, and another has checkwriting and acts as my second-tier emergency fund.
__________________
Retired in late 2008 at age 45. Cashed in company stock, bought a lot of shares in a big bond fund and am living nicely off its dividends. IRA, SS, and a pension await me at age 60 and later. No kids, no debts.

"I want my money working for me instead of me working for my money!"
scrabbler1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-03-2020, 04:23 PM   #23
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
Midpack's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: NC
Posts: 16,716
The OP didn't say whether he/she is (mostly) FIRE or SIRE - that could make a difference in AA if not holdings. Some of the answers appear to be from FIRE members, others evidently SIRE.

Not disclosing FIRE vs SIRE (or somewhere between) is a common issue here, the answers to many questions are vastly different from one group to the other.
__________________
No one agrees with other people's opinions; they merely agree with their own opinions -- expressed by somebody else. Sydney Tremayne
Retired Jun 2011 at age 57

Target AA: 50% equity funds / 30% bond funds / 20% cash
Target WR: Approx 2.5% Approx 20% SI (secure income, SS only)
Midpack is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 10-03-2020, 04:30 PM   #24
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
RunningBum's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Posts: 10,890
Quote:
Originally Posted by cbo111 View Post
Vanguard now offers you the ability to purchase some funds as ETFs. These ETFs have lower expense ratios. VG Total Stock Market (VTSAX) becomes VTI. And as a bonus. intraday trading is possible with these ETF funds, which can be very handy when timing is critical.
That's all true. VTI has a .01% lower expense ratio than VTSAX. But as a buy-and-hold investor, I find ETFs a pain. If I've got $10,000 to invest, and want to be fully invested, I have to figure out how many shares will get me as close as possible, and I can't do a market price buy since the price may take me over $10,000. So I set a bid price, and on a day when prices are going up I might wind up chasing it by raising my bids until I get it. Or I could wait for it to drop, but it might not, at least not for awhile.

Admittedly I don't like not knowing what might happen to the price of a mutual fund before my buy or sell is done at the end of the day, but at least I can be fully invested.

Am I missing something that would make ETFs easier to buy if you have a set amount to invest?
RunningBum is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-03-2020, 05:50 PM   #25
Recycles dryer sheets
 
Join Date: Sep 2018
Posts: 222
+1 As with others have written, we choose low-cost, broad index funds with Fido and Vanguard (70% AA). We also have a SF rental (30% AA)
Octogirl is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-03-2020, 07:26 PM   #26
Full time employment: Posting here.
 
Join Date: Sep 2017
Posts: 631
I have just retired.
albireo13 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-03-2020, 07:38 PM   #27
Dryer sheet wannabe
 
Join Date: Dec 2018
Location: Eagan
Posts: 12
Simple Bogle 3 fund Philosophy. FXNAX, FTIHX, FSKAX. Asset allocation 80/20 to 60/40 stocks to bonds depending on age. Easy. Set it and forget it. Unless you want to rebalance once per year.
SoaringEagle is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-03-2020, 10:07 PM   #28
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
jollystomper's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Posts: 3,567
Before I got sensible about this, my initial foray into index funds was all over the place. I had funds from 6 different mutual fund companies. Eventually as I became more educated I focused on index funds within the two companies. Vanguard due to low cost. Fidelity in truth because I opened my first MM account with them back in the 1980s, and then Megacorp started using them for 401K so I decided to look for funds there. Fidelity also became more competitive in cost with Vanguard. I still have two funds from another company (American Century), primarily because, having owned them for so long, selling them nowt will incur a lot of capital gains. I am trying to balance that with doing Roth conversions and not exceeding my current tax bracket.
__________________
FIREd date: June 26, 2018 - wwwwwwhat a rush!
jollystomper is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-04-2020, 03:02 AM   #29
Full time employment: Posting here.
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: London
Posts: 776
I manage all of my own money. I have a slightly more complex portfolio than some but its all indexed (except for a bit of play money).

I maintain the diversity of funds because it does seem to create re-balancing opportunities by putting new money into the weak spots.

Full disclosure:
1) I'm a few years from FIRE but have a NQDC plan that will pay me for over a decade, so this is a very long term portfolio
2) Not having a mortgage makes me smile, so I'm a bit more aggressive here
3) Dividends make me smile, so I hold more dividend bearing things than others
4) You really have to pay attention to sticking the right things in IRAs
5) This is my managed account structure...in my 401K I've just got things stashed in a couple of Fidelity target date funds

Large Cap: 40%
DIA
SPY
QQQ
DLN

Small Cap: 15%
VB

International: 20%
FNDF
SCHE
VYMI

Fixed Income: 15%
SWAGX
PFFD
SCHP
VTEB

REIT: 10%
SCHH
VGSLX
__________________
Luck is when Preparation meets Opportunity.
Closet_Gamer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-04-2020, 04:22 AM   #30
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
DrRoy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2015
Location: Michigan
Posts: 3,528
Index ETF's and a mix of investment grade corporate bonds at Fido.
__________________
"The mountains are calling, and I must go." John Muir
DrRoy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-04-2020, 05:23 AM   #31
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Posts: 1,127
Quote:
Originally Posted by skipro33 View Post
Ditto, but not as many index funds. At Fidelity;
SPAXX for cash
FSKAX for Dow
FTIAX for international
FXAIX for S&P 500
FXNAX for bond
FSKAX is total US market, not Dow.

To answer OP's question: index funds (total US, total ex-US and total bond).
mrfeh is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-04-2020, 05:40 AM   #32
Give me a museum and I'll fill it. (Picasso)
Give me a forum ...
target2019's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Stuck in the mud somewhere in the NJ swamp
Posts: 7,100
VTRIXVanguard International Value Fund
*VEMIXMSCI EM Indexed Equit
*VTMGXDeveloped Markets Index
*PEOPXEQ/Equity 500 Index
*UMAFXUSAA Managed Allocation (S/D IRAs)
VTSAXVanguard Total Stock Market Index Fund Adm
VGSTXVanguard STAR Fund
VWIAXWellesley Income Fund Adm
VGSLXVanguard REIT Index Fund Admiral Shares
*VEXAXSmall/Mid Cap Index Eq Fund
VSIAXVanguard Small-Cap Value Index Fund
*VASGXTaxable Brokerage
VBTLXVanguard Total Bond Market Index Fund Adm
VNJTXVanguard NJ Long-Term Tax-Exempt Fund Inv
*BSVStable Value Fund
*VWSTXGuaranteed Interest Account
*PROXY

Cash is invested in money market, CD, Discover and checking.
target2019 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-04-2020, 06:04 AM   #33
Full time employment: Posting here.
racy's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Posts: 740
My Vanguard holdings:
Bonds
High-Yield Corp - because I'm chasing yield
Intermed-Term Corp - good balance of yield & duration
Total Bond Market Index - I need some govt w/ my corps

Stocks
Total Stock Market Index - because I'm supposed to
Int'l Growth Fund - want large company developed & emerging
Health Care Index - I need a little sector action!
Explorer Fund - a dose of small & midcap to offset FAANG
Wellesley Income - I just like 'em.

REIT Index fund - I pretend it's a diversifier, not a stock.
__________________
"It is better to have a permanent income than to be fascinating". Oscar Wilde
racy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-04-2020, 06:26 AM   #34
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
The Cosmic Avenger's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2016
Location: Mid-Atlantic
Posts: 1,804
For both my Roth IRA and my 401(k):
75% FXAIX (S&P index)
25% FXNAX (bonds)


(I do have some inherited accounts that I didn't sell off and reallocate, and while they've done well, if I had to do it again I would have reallocated them right away. But I'm not counting those because 1) they're all over the place, and they would be a pain to list here, and 2) I didn't actively choose their allocation, so in a way they're not relevant to your question.)
__________________
-Looking to FIRE in the mid-2020s, which would be our mid-50s.
The Cosmic Avenger is online now   Reply With Quote
Thanks for starting a good thread
Old 10-04-2020, 03:45 PM   #35
Recycles dryer sheets
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 341
Thanks for starting a good thread

I have 5 Vanguard Mutual Funds in total, which I manage with the help of members on this & Bogleheads Forums.

Taxable Accounts -
VTSAX - Total Stock Market Index Admiral
VTIAX - Total International Stock Market Index Admiral
VWIUX - Tax Exempt Intermediate Term Bond Fund

Tax Deferred Accounts -
VBTLX - Total Bond Market Index
VTABX - Total International Bond Index

Bank Accounts have Online Savings & CDs

Overall Asset Allocation = 55/45, retiring next year

During Accumulation Phase, I had around 10 Vanguard Funds, finally pared them down to 5, achieving diversification in most markets,( but not all ) & also to make it easier to manage it by myself.
rkser is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-04-2020, 03:45 PM   #36
Dryer sheet wannabe
 
Join Date: Aug 2020
Posts: 15
So far manage my own but have talked with several financial advisors for information. Also not retired yet, but have Q1 target next year so reallocating and adjusting holdings for that event.

IRA
Vanguard Total Stock Market ETF
Vanguard Total International Stock Index Fund
Vanguard Dividend Appreciation ETF
Vanguard Information Technology ETF
Delta Airlines
Vanguard Intermediate Term Corp Bond ETF
Vanguard Intermediate Investment Grade Fund
Vanguard Short-term Investment Grade Fund
Vanguard Total Bond Index Fund
Vanguard Total International Bond Index Fund

401k
AB Growth I
T. Rowe Price Retirement 2030

Brokerage
Vanguard Total Stock Market ETF
Apple
Cash
GATime is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-05-2020, 07:06 AM   #37
Recycles dryer sheets
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Posts: 334
No mutual funds or ETFs.

In the stock/bond portion of my portfolio, I only own individual stocks and individual municipal bonds. I do my own research and trades. No FA.

Currently 60 years old and retired at 57.
phil1ben is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-05-2020, 07:08 AM   #38
Recycles dryer sheets
madsquopper's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Vienna
Posts: 196
Like most here, I use whatever index EFT's/funds have the lowest expense ratio. I hold about 6-10 asset classes and most of the items are either Vanguard or Ishares (via Fidelity). FYI - when I started doing RMD auto-withdrawals, I found that Fidelity, at least, won't do an auto-pull from an ETF; only a fund, because of the intra-day timing issue of fluctuating price. So for those accounts I need enough in ETF's to cover that, if I want to hold those.
madsquopper is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-05-2020, 08:15 AM   #39
Full time employment: Posting here.
 
Join Date: May 2017
Posts: 709
I'm not retired yet. Still have ~5 years until that happens. However, I do have a decent sized portfolio (+7 figs) and manage it myself.

Asset allocation is 86/5/9/3. The 3% is some small private equity investments.

The 85% Equities is split 55/45 funds/stocks and roughly 88/12 domestic/Int'l. The funds are all Schwab and Vanguard index funds with the exception of some legacy American funds that I still hold due to large long term capital gains. The stock portion consists of about 40 names that rarely changes.

The 5% fixed income portion in made up of a handful of baby bonds, preferred stocks and some private debt.

Cash is all in SWVXX
brokrken is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-05-2020, 08:43 AM   #40
Thinks s/he gets paid by the post
38Chevy454's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2013
Location: Cincinnati, OH
Posts: 2,982
I 100% self manage. I am Fidelity guy, and use broad widely held diverse mutual funds. Mix of the zero funds, lower fee funds and some other funds with a bit higher fees; guess I satisfy my desire to play in some sectors or specific objectives. Some are just old from 401k and have left them, so it does have some duplication areas. This shows I probably could reduce and simplify some. Overall AA mix is currently 78/20 with 2% cash. Here are what I have, in no particular order of amounts:
FNCMX - NASDAQ composite
FPURX - Puritan 60/40 nominal mix
FZROX - Zero total market index
FBGRX - Blue chip growth
FAGIX - Capital and income
FBIOX - Biotech
FDGRX - Growth company
FBALX - Balanced 60/40 nominal
FTBFX - Total bond
FSMVX - Mid cap value
FLVEX - Large cap value
FZIPX - Zero extended market index
FTIHX - Total international index
__________________
The advice we're giving you is invaluable, that's why it's free
Experience is a good teacher, but the tuition can get expensive real fast

Semi-Retired 7/1/16: working part-time (60%) for now [4/24/17 changed to 80%]
Retired Aug 2, 2017; age 53
38Chevy454 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
How many totally manage their own nest egg? albireo13 FIRE and Money 314 10-15-2020 11:34 PM
Do you think that you owe your kids a good nest egg? swampwiz FIRE and Money 108 07-31-2011 07:15 PM
Are you concerned that your nest egg will cause you to get means tested out of SS? swampwiz FIRE and Money 138 02-12-2011 11:52 AM
Simple Math to See If You Have an Age-Appropriate Nest Egg danm FIRE and Money 2 01-07-2008 01:21 PM

» Quick Links

 
All times are GMT -6. The time now is 01:02 PM.
 
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2021, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.