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Old 01-26-2017, 10:19 PM   #41
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Originally Posted by RobbieB View Post
Perfection is over rated.

Life becomes much easier when you give up on perfection and "that's good enough" is OK.
Love this. Perfect for me to see today. I want this as a mainstay of my retirement.

Thank you. I just posted it on my FB page- hope you don't care.
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Old 01-26-2017, 10:51 PM   #42
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I retired a year and a half ago. I was discussing my plans with one of the guys on my commuter bus that was a few years older than me and he said that maybe he should consider doing the same thing. He died 3 months later. He was 63. I was ready even though I didn't have a huge retirement fund. My fallback plan is to go back to work if I have to.
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Old 01-26-2017, 11:12 PM   #43
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My one sentence take on your situation: your emotional brain is overpowering your logical brain. Logic tells you that all is good and retire. Emotion says need more safety and comfort factor.

So listen to your left side brain and then allow the right side brain to enjoy the extra time for golf and whatever once you retire.
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Old 01-26-2017, 11:35 PM   #44
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I went through a couple rounds of OMY . I finally gave notice on Monday that I will be retiring in may. I am sure I will go through a range of emotions over the coming months, but it felt great. I'm 47, so I was leaving a lot on the table. However, with 2 young kids that I get to spend quality time with it is the right time for me.
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Old 01-27-2017, 07:46 AM   #45
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Originally Posted by Sunset View Post
...my Cousin blew a big fat inheritance on booze, hookers, losers, and more booze...
I bet he squandered the rest!
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Old 01-27-2017, 07:49 AM   #46
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The best approach is to write your own eulogy and make sure you have enough material that you are proud of. "In spite of working for megacorp, Bob managed to..."
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Old 01-27-2017, 08:00 AM   #47
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Yup. And keep in mind that this forum is filled with people who are happily retired, so what you will get, naturally, is plenty of exhortations to retire early and reasons to do that. You won't hear much from the other side of the coin, though. You won't hear much about the benefits of work ("w*rk") here; you won't see posts from people who regretted retiring or who are finding retirement really difficult. We've got a lot of smart folks here, but it's definitely a select, skewed sample. You probably knew that when you made the thread, though.
Agree, nothing wrong with the self selection here as long as you know it's here and can balance it out in your thinking.
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Old 01-27-2017, 08:06 AM   #48
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Every once in a while, we think a bit about this, even though I'm already retired. We know that we have enough, but once in a while, the chat turns to fulfillment and those kinds of things, then inevitably, how much extra savings a couple more years would have brought enters the conversation. Truthfully, I'd love to be able to afford a million dollar second home in Hawaii, and to have my own plane, and..., and..., and...,. But when I think of those things, and what I already have going on in my life, and I wonder when I'd ever have time for those things. Especially now with DW's medical problems, I simply wouldn't be able to use any more that I already have. Given that, DW and I are convinced that me being able to retire early is one of our greatest blessings, especially since she needs someone to be with her almost constantly, until we get her issues under control.

So, think again whether you have enough, whether you will be happy with what you have (or if only more will give you the satisfaction you seek), and if you have what you need to be satisfied and happy until the end, why not pull the plug?
Likewise, a little more could always come in handy. But most people are pretty good at getting comfortable with their means. To be otherwise would just cause unhappiness in retirement. At some point you just have to put a pin in it and say enough. This "enough" will depend on many things and will be different for everyone. But basically when the "hassle" of working becomes bigger than the financial benefits of working, most people call it quits.
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Old 01-27-2017, 11:49 AM   #49
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Figure out what you most want to do in retirement and start doing it. If work becomes a problem, reduce your work load or retire.

I reached financial independence. My job as a professor is really easy and it does not make sense to walk away. I want to do a lot of travel in my retirement, so I started last year and visited 12 countries. I have booked tickets and hotels to 6 countries in the first half of 2017. I just want to see how much travel I can do joyfully. If I need more than half of my time for travel, then I will not hesitate to walk away from my job.

For me, I could not find other things that I want to do in retirement and I cannot do with my teaching job. So staying at work makes sense.
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Old 01-27-2017, 11:59 AM   #50
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Someone once posted something here about the OMY syndrome that has stuck with me ever since: The reason your pension and SS numbers increase with each 12 month period you delay taking is because actuarial, your going to die one year sooner.

Put that in your pipe and smoke it a bit, if you will. It might help.
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Old 01-27-2017, 12:11 PM   #51
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I had a friend that was 10 years older then me tell me that when you are ready to retire you will just know. She was right and I retired shortly before my 58th birthday. 7 months later I was offered a chance to teach an online college course that I love. If I had not been retired I would not have taken the job. If I ever find that I don't like doing that I will quit. I have had friends die in 50's and early 60's. I did not want to work f.t. until I die.
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Old 01-27-2017, 01:59 PM   #52
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Don't underestimate the risk of someday wishing you'd retired earlier.
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+1
CaptTom: is than an original on your part? If so, bravo!
All that talk of "risk" got me thinking about my old (plagiarized) saying about nobody every lying on their death bed wishing they'd spent more time at the office.

It sort of just came out from that.
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Old 01-28-2017, 11:04 AM   #53
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My decision was a bit different. I liked my job and I think I was still good at it but I was looking at how much time I wanted to have for retirement. OMY meant OLY for retirement. So I pulled the pin and they were able to organize my orderly departure 6 weeks later.

But it is a personal decision!
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Old 01-28-2017, 12:22 PM   #54
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Originally Posted by Rambler View Post
Every once in a while, we think a bit about this, even though I'm already retired. We know that we have enough, but once in a while, the chat turns to fulfillment and those kinds of things, then inevitably, how much extra savings a couple more years would have brought enters the conversation. Truthfully, I'd love to be able to afford a million dollar second home in Hawaii, and to have my own plane, and..., and..., and...,. But when I think of those things, and what I already have going on in my life, and I wonder when I'd ever have time for those things. Especially now with DW's medical problems, I simply wouldn't be able to use any more that I already have. Given that, DW and I are convinced that me being able to retire early is one of our greatest blessings, especially since she needs someone to be with her almost constantly, until we get her issues under control.

So, think again whether you have enough, whether you will be happy with what you have (or if only more will give you the satisfaction you seek), and if you have what you need to be satisfied and happy until the end, why not pull the plug?
Well said! It has become increasingly clear to me that further savings accumulation for the sake of luxury doesn't make sense. I could easily fill my days with simple activities and enjoyment of the possessions I already own.
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Old 01-28-2017, 03:58 PM   #55
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Well said! It has become increasingly clear to me that further savings accumulation for the sake of luxury doesn't make sense. I could easily fill my days with simple activities and enjoyment of the possessions I already own.
Plus I think much of the pleasure of owning very expensive things is for an ego boost. I'm past that.
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Old 01-28-2017, 04:14 PM   #56
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Plus I think much of the pleasure of owning very expensive things is for an ego boost. I'm past that.
+1
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Old 01-28-2017, 05:23 PM   #57
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So.....I am not alone in this delima Hurray, so glad for this thread. I'll be 62 in March. So tired of the pressures of my job.....medical device sales.


OK I'm also in sales and though off topic, can't resist the chance to get input. Over the last 5 or so years. Sales has really begun to suck! I'm making money (not as much as I would like), but can't get appointments, or returned e-mail and phone calls. Just landed prototypes on a $800K piece of business after an 8 month gestation. Couldn't even get a return call to discuss our proposal prior to sending the quote.

But they ordered.

I constantly look at my time through a cost lens, and get down right angry when a low $$$ customer needs a vist, and I lose $$$ on the trip. I'm also an independent contractor so I own the cost center.

General observations seeking guidance:
1) Trend towards direct employees to handle sales if there is any demand for the product.
2) General lack of activity for outside sales personnel.
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Old 01-28-2017, 10:49 PM   #58
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dropping dead is not something I can recover from as easily
True. Tough to bounce back from that one.
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Old 01-30-2017, 08:32 AM   #59
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General observations seeking guidance:
1) Trend towards direct employees to handle sales if there is any demand for the product.
2) General lack of activity for outside sales personnel.
I think you have been evolved out of a job! Change industries or ER?
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Old 01-30-2017, 08:35 AM   #60
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I think you have been evolved out of a job!
+1

Looks like you're being kicked out of the club.
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